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BULLETIN OF THE 

■" ||Nil>gE;|^ITY OF 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 



CATALOG ISfU MBER 

FOR 



1930-1931 



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The University of New Hampshire 
and the New Hampshire College of 
Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts 

DURHAM - NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Save this catalog and bring it 
with you. It will be needed for 
reference throughout the year. 



BULLETIN 

of the 

UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Vol. XXI March, 1930 No. 7 



CALENDAR 




1930 1931 


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UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1930-1931 

SUMMER SESSION 



June 30 Monday 
July 1 Tuesday 
Aug. 8 Friday 



Registration Day 
Classes begin at 8 a.m. 
Summer Session closes at 4 p.m. 



Sept. 16 
Sept. 22 
Sept. 23 
Sept. 24 
Oct. 17 
Oct. 25 
Oct. 30 
Nov. 8 
Nov. 26 



Tuesday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Thursday 

Saturday 

Wednesday 



Dec. 8-12 Mon.-Fri. 
Dec. 12 Friday 



FALL TERM 

1930 

Matriculation Day — Freshman Class 

Registration Day — All Classes 

Recitations begin at 8 a.m. 

University Day — Afternoon holiday 

Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees 

Home-coming Day 

Mid-Term warnings to be filed, 5 p.m. 

Dads' Day 

Thanksgiving recess — Wed., 12.30 p.m. 

Fri., 8 A.M. 
Fall Term examinations 
Fall Term closes at 4 p.m. 



to 



Jan. 5 Monday 

Jan. 6 Tuesday 

Jan. 16 Friday 

Feb. 10 Tuesday 

Feb. — Fri., Sat. 

Mar. 10 Tuesday 
Mar. 16-20 Mon.-Fri. 

Mar. 20 Friday 



WINTER TERM 

1931 

Registration Day 
Classes begin at 8 a.m. 
Meeting of Board of Trustees 
Mid-Term warnings to be filed, 5 p.m. 
Winter Carnival, Fri., 12.30 p.m. to Sat., 

12.30 p.m. 
Town Meeting 
Winter Term examinations 
Winter Term closes at 4 p.m. 



Mar. 30 
Mar. 31 
Apr. 17 
May 5 
May 2 
May — 
May 30 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Friday 

Tuesday 

Saturday 

Fri., Sat. 

Saturday 



SPRING TERM 

1931 

Registration Day 
Recitations begin at 8 a.m. 
Meeting of Board of Trustees 
Mid-Term warnings to be filed, 5 p.m. 
Mothers' Day 
Military Manoeuvres 
Memorial Day — Holiday 

7 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

June 8-12 Mon.-Fri. Spring Term examinations 

June 10 Wednesday Senior examinations close at 4 p.m. 

June 13 Saturday Class Day — Alumni Day — Meeting of 

Board of Trustees 
June 14 Sunday Baccalaureate Day 

June 15 Monday Commencement Day 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

His Excellency, Governor Charles W. Tobey, ll.d., ex officio 
Andrew L. Felker, Commissioner of Agriculture, ex officio 



President Edward M. Lewis, litt.d., ll.d., ex officio 

D WIGHT Hall, a.b.. President 

October 29, 1915 to June 30, 1931 

Roy D. Hunter 

June 14, 1916 to June 30, 1933 

Elizabeth C. Sawyer 

July 12, 1925 to June 30, 1934 

* Albert H. Brown, b.s., Secretary 

September 1, 1925 to June 30, 1932 

Harry D. Sawyer 

September 15, 1926 to June 30, 1930 

James A. Wellman, b.s. 

January 26, 1928 to June 30, 1931 

Robert T. Kingsbury 

January 27, 1928 to June 30, 1932 

John W. Pearson, a.b. 

January 26, 1928 to June 30, 1932 

Albertus T. Dudley, a.b. 

June 14, 1928 to June 30, 1933 



Dover 



Claremont 



Dover 



Strafford 



Woodstock 



Manchester 



Keene 



Concord 



Exeter 



♦Charles H. Hood, d.sc. Charlestown, Mass. 

May 6, 1929 to June 30, 1931 

* Elected by Alumni. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Edward M. Lewis, litt.d., ll.d., President of the University 

Charles H. Pettee, a.m., c.e., ll.d., Dean of the Faculty 

John C. Kendall, b.s.. Director of the Experiment Station and Extension 

Service 
Frederick W. Taylor, b.s. (Agr.), Dean of the College of Agriculture 
Albert N. French, m.a.. Dean of the College of Liberal Arts 
George W. Case, m.c.e., Dean of the College of Technology 
Hermon L. Slobin, PH.D., Dean of the Graduate School 
Norman Alexander, m.a., ll.b., Dean of Men 
Elizabeth P. DeMeritt, m.a., Dean of Women 



Raymond C. Magrath, Treasurer and Business Secretary 

Oren V. Henderson, Registrar 

Edward Y. Blewett, b.a.. Executive Secretary 

Arthur W. White, m.d., University Physician ; 

Harold W. Loveren, b.s.. Superintendent of Property 

Eric T. Huddleston, b.arch., Supervising Architect 

MAJOR ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS 

Charles W. Pattee, b.a., Alumni Secretary 

Helen W. Leighton, Manager of the University Dining Hall 

Fred L. Wentworth, Manager of the Bookstore 

Doris Beane, a.b., Secretary to the President 

E. Prescott Campbell, Accountant, Business Office 

Beatrice M. Richmond, Cashier, Business Office 

Gladys Tasker, Assistant Registrar 

Myrtle V, Fletcher, r.n.. Nurse 

Betty I. Glidden, Secretary to the Dean of Agriculture 

Helen F. Jenkins, Secretary to the College of Liberal Arts 

Evelyn G. Hawkins, Secretary to the Dean of Liberal Arts 

Mildred M. Flanders, Secretary to the Dean of Technology 

Charles O. Nason, Secretary to the Department of Physical Education for 

Men 
Lillian B. Hudon, b.s., Assistant Manager of the University Dining Hall 



Marcia N. Sanders, Matron of Smith Hall 
Annie L. Sawyer, Matron of the Commons Dormitory 
Shirlie L. Whitney, Matron of Congreve Hall 
Annie J. Morgan, Matron of Ballard Hall 
Louisa M. Potts, Matron of Hetzel Hall 
Emma A. Thompson, Matron of Fairchild Hall 

10 



THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY 

LIBRARY STAFF 

William W. Shirley, b.s., Librarian 

Charlotte A. Thompson, Assistant Librarian, emeritus 

Mary H. Falt, b.a., b.s., Circulation Assistant 

J. Doris Dart, b.s.. Catalogue Librarian 

William H. Brewer, Jr., Reference Assistant 

Caroline O. Barstow, Library Assistant 

Gratia T. Huggins, Library Assistant 

PROFESSORS* 

Charles H. Pettee, a.m., c.e,, ll.d., Professor of Meteorology 

Clarence W. Scott, ll.d.. Professor of English 

Frederick W. Taylor, b.s. (Agr.), Professor of Agronomy 

C. Floyd Jackson, b.a., m.s.. Professor of Zoology 

Walter C. O'Kane, m.a.. Professor of Economic Entomology 

Alfred E. Richards, ph.d.. Professor of English 

Ormond R. Butler, ph.d.. Professor of Botany 

Eric T. Huddleston, b.arch.. Professor of Architecture 

William H. Cowell, b.s., Director and Professor of Physical Education 

for Men 
Karl W. Woodward, a.b., m.f., Professor of Forestry 
John M. Fuller, b.s.. Professor of Dairy Husbandry 
Horace L. Howes, ph.d.. Professor of Physics 
Hermon L. Slobin, PH.D., Professor of Mathematics and Dean of the 

Graduate School 
Harry W. Smith, a.m.. Professor of Economics 
Leon W. Hitchcock, b.s., Professor of Electrical Engineering 
Albert N. French, m.a.. Professor of Sociology 
IGeorge F. Potter, m.s., Professor of Horticulture 
Helen F. McLaughlin, a.m., Professor of Home Economics 
Thomas G. Phillips, ph.d.. Professor of Agricultural and Biological 

Chemistry 
Donald C. Babcock, s.t.b., a.m.. Professor of History 
George W. Case, m.c.e.. Professor of Mechanical Engineering and 

Director of the Engineering Experiment Station 
Herbert F. Rudd, ph.d.. Professor of Philosophy and Psychology 
Hugo E. Pitz, c.e.. Major, c.a.c, Professor of Military Science and 

Tactics 
Justin O. Wellman, a.m., ed.m.. Professor of Education and Director of 

the Summer School 
Harold H. Scudder, b.s.. Professor of English 
Thomas B. Charles, b.s., Professor of Poultry Husbandry 
George N. Bauer, ph.d., Professor of Statistics and Officer in Charge of 

Freshmen 
M. Gale Eastman, m.s.. Professor of Agricultural Economics 
Harold A. Iddles, ph.d.. Professor of Chemistry 

* Arranged in order of seniority of appointment, 
t Leave of absence, February 7 to June 11, 1930. 

11 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS * 

James H. Marceau, a.b., Associate Professor of Languages 

Henry C. Swasey, b.s., Associate Professor of Physical Education for 

Men 
Arthur W. Johnson, m.b.a., Associate Professor of Economics 
Edmond W. Bowler, b.s., Associate Professor and Acting Head of the 

Department of Civil Engineering 
William G. Hennessy, a.m., Associate Professor of English 
Thorsten W. Kalijarvi, M.A., LL.B., Associate Professor of Political 

Science 
Claude T. Lloyd, ph.d.. Associate Professor of English 
Norman Alexander, m.a., ll.b.. Associate Professor of Economics and 

Dean of Men 
Adolph G. Ekdahl, PH.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy and Psy- 
chology 
Robert W. Manton, Associate Professor and Director of Music 
Clement Moran, b.a., Associate Professor of Physics 
Edward L. Getchell, b.s., e.e.. Associate Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering 
Alma D. Jackson, m.a.. Associate Professor of Zoology 
Lucinda p. Smith, b.a., Associate Professor of English 
John S. Walsh, a.m.. Associate Professor and Acting Head of the Depart- 
ment of Languages 
Hannibal G. Duncan, ph.d., Associate Professor of Economics and 
Sociology 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS * 

Jesse R. Hepler, m.s.. Assistant Professor of Horticulture 

Thomas J. Laton, b.s., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Melvin M. Smith, m.a.. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Philip R. Lowry, m.s.. Assistant Professor of Economic E^itomology 

Clark L. Stevens, m.f.. Assistant Professor of Forestry 

Walter E. Wilbur, m.s.. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Paul C. Sweet, b.s.. Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Men 

Edward T. Donovan, b.s.. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

fEsTHER L. Brown, ph.d.. Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Arthur W. Jones, m.a.. Assistant Professor of History 

John D. Hauslein, m.a.. Assistant Professor of Economics 

Katharine G. Watson, b.s., m.a.. Assistant Professor and Director of 

Physical Education for Women 
Irma G. Bowen, b.s.. Assistant Professor of Home Economics 
Hem AN C. Fogg, m.s.. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Frederick D. Jackson, b.s., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
Rudolf L. Hering, ph.b., m.a., Assistant Professor of Languages 
Bertha M. Kirk, m.a., Assistant Professor of Physical Education for 

Women 

* Arranged in order of seniority of appointment. 
t Leave of absence, 1929-30. 

12 



THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY 

James H. Day, b.s., Captain, Infantry, Assistant Professor of Military 

Science and Tactics 
Marion E. Mills, b.s., m.a.. Assistant Professor of Botany 
Harlan M. Bisbee, a.m.. Assistant Professor of Education 
Raymond R. Starke, a.m.. Assistant Professor of Physics 
fSTANLEY R. Shimer, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural and 

Biological Chemistry 
George W. White, m.a., Assistant Professor of Geology 
L. Phelps Latimer, ph.d., Assistant Professor of Horticulture 
Norman P. Williams, Captain, Infantry, Assistant Professor of Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics 
Julio Berzunza, m.a.. Assistant Professor of Languages 
Carl L. Martin, d.v.m., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science 
George B. Anderson, b.s. in e.e.. First Lieutenant, c.a.c. Assistant 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
Lawrence H. Opdycke, ph.d., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Edward H. Wells, m.a.. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
E. Howard Stolworthy, b.s.. Assistant Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering 
Chester E. Dodge, Assistant Professor of Architecture 
Edythe T. Richardson, m.s.. Assistant Professor of Zoology 
Roland E. Partridge, a.b.. Assistant Professor of Social Science and 

Sociology 
Allan B. Partridge, m.a.. Assistant Professor of History 
Philip M. Marston, m.a.. Assistant Professor of Social Science and 

Sociology 
Paul S. Schoedinger, m.a., Assistant Professor of English 
Marvin R. Solt, m.s., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
William B. Nulsen, b.s., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
Naomi M. G. Ekdahl, ph.d.. Assistant Professor of Education 
Edmund A. Cortez, m.a., ed.m.. Assistant Professor of English 
James F. McGraw, a.b.. First Lieutenant, Infantry, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Military Science and Tactics 
Bradford F. Kimball, ph.d., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

INSTRUCTORS* 

James Macfarlane, Instructor in Floriculture 

Lyman J. Batchelder, Instructor in Wood Shop 

Paul H. Shramm, Instructor in Drawing 

Bert E. Huggins, Instructor in Dairy Husbandry 

Helen W. Leighton, Instructor in Home Economics 

John C. Tonkin, Instructor in Machine Shop 

Ernest W. Christensen, b.s.. Instructor in Physical Education for Men 

JDoNALD G. Barton, m.s., Instructor in Zoology 

Richard H. Kimball, a.m.. Instructor in Chemistry 

Stuart Dunn, m.s., Instructor in Botany 

t Leave of absence, July 1, 1929 to September 1, 1930. 

* Arranged in order of seniority of appointment. % Leave of absence, 1929-30. 

13 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

William F. Marsh, Instructor in Physical Education for Men 

Elias M. O'Connell, Instructor in Forging 

Robert G. Webster, b.a., Instructor in English 

Clair W. Swonger, a.m.. Instructor in Economics 

Lewis C. Swain, b.s.. Instructor in Music 

John C. Herring, ed.m., Instructor in English and Education 

Homer O. Stuart, m.s., Instructor in Poultry Husbandry 

Paul P. Grigaut, b. es l.. Instructor in Languages 

Harold M. Mayo, s.b.. Research Assistant 

T. Ralph Meyers, m.a., Instructor in Geology 

Paul E. Farnum, b.s., Instructor in Agricultural Education 

Dorothy T. Barton, m.s., Instructor in Zoology 

Carroll M. Degler, m.b.a., Instructor in Economics 

Albert F. Daggett, b.s.. Instructor in Chemistry 

William Yale, ph.b., m.a., Instructor in History 

Marion Russell, b.s.. Instructor in Physical Education for Women 

Charles A. Bottorff, Jr., d.v.m., Instructor in Poultry Husbandry 

Arnold Perreton, b.a. in arch.. Instructor in Architecture 

Marion J. Stol worthy, Instructor in Home Economics 

Carl Lundholm, b.s., Instructor in Physical Education for Men 

E. Barton Hills, m.a.. Instructor in English 

Russell R. Skelton, b.s. in c.e.. Instructor in Civil Engineering 

Herbert C. Moore, m.s.. Instructor in Dairy Husbandry 

Harold I. Leavitt, b.s.. Instructor in Physics and Civil Engineering 

Thomas H. McGrail, b.a.. Instructor in English 

Sherwood P. Smedley, m.a.. Instructor in Chemistry 

Nellie E. Pottle, m.a., Instructor in English 

Leroy J. HiGGiNS, B.S., Instructor in Agronomy 

Frederic K. Arnold, a.b.. Instructor in Languages 

Allen D. Robinson, m.s., Instructor in Agricultural and Biological 

Chemistry 
William H. Hartwell, m.s., Instructor in Physics 
James M. Sanders, m.a.. Instructor in Zoology 
John A. Floyd, a.b.. Instructor in Languages 
Anna D. Murphy, a.b.. Instructor in Languages 
Philip G. Neserius, m.a.. Instructor in Political Science 
Harry M. Rugg, Instructor in Civil and Mechanical Engineering 
W. Russell Hilliard, b.s.. Instructor in Aeronautics 

James S. Chamberlin, b.s. in c.e., Lecturer on Personnel Relationships, 
College of Technology 

ASSISTANTS * 

Fred W. Wood, Sergeant, Assistant in Military Science and Tactics 
Fred H. Brown, Sergeant, Assistant in Military Science and Tactics 
Dennis E. Rusk, b.s. (Agr.), Assistant in Animal Husbandry and Super- 
intendent of Live Stock 

* Arranged in order of seniority of appointment. 

14 



THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY 

Percy F. Reed, Assistant in Physical Education for Men 

Thomas A. Pickett, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Agricultural and 

Biological Chemistry 
Harold E. Abbott, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Charles N. Elliott, b.a., Graduate Assistant in the Office of the Dean of 

the College of Liberal Arts 
Charles A. Sewall, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Mathematics 
Louise S. Woodman, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Mathematics 
H. Gwendolyn Jones, m.a.. Assistant in Sociology 
John F. Sheehan, b.s., Graduate Assistant in Zoology 
Ruth E. Thompson, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Zoology 
Wilfred B. Krabek, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Elizabeth A. Redden, b.a.. Graduate Assistant in Statistics 
Bethyl C. Hennessy, Assistant in Oral English 
Gertrude E. Nye, b.a.. Graduate Assistant in English 
Alfred H. Miller, a.b.. Assistant in Physical Education for Men 
Kathleen G. Durkin, b.s., Assistant in Economics 



15 



NEW HAMPSHIRE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 

STATION 

THE STATION STAFF 

Edward M. Lewis, litt.d., ll.d., President 

John C. Kendall, b.s., Director 

Frederick W. Taylor, b.s, (Agr.), Agronomist 

Walter C. O'Kane, m.a.. Entomologist 

Ormond R. Butler, ph.d.. Botanist 

Ernest G. Ritzman, m.s., Research Professor in Animal Husbandry 

Karl W. Woodward, a.b., m.f., Forester 

John M. Fuller, b.s.. Dairy Husbandman 

*George F. Potter, m.s.. Horticulturist 

Thomas G. Phillips, ph.d.. Chemist 

Thomas B. Charles, b.s.. Poultry Husbandman 

fHARRY C. WooDWORTH, M.S., Agricultural Economist 

M. Gale Eastman, m.s., Associate Agricultural Economist 

Todd O. Smith, m.s.. Associate Chemist 

Ford S. Prince, b.s.. Associate Agronomist 

Jesse R. Hepler, m.s.. Assistant in Vegetable Gardening 

Philip R. Lowry, m.s.. Assistant Entomologist 

Clark L. Stevens, m.f.. Assistant Forester 

JStanley R. Shimer, m.s., Assistant Chemist 

Walter T. Ackerman, m.s., Specialist in Rural Electricity 

Max F. Abell, ph.d.. Assistant Agricultural Economist 

Carl L. Martin, d.v.m., Veterinarian 

Charles A. Bottorff, Jr., d.v.m.. Poultry Pathologist 

Earl H. Rinear, m.s.. Research Assistant in Marketing 

Herbert C. Moore, m.s.. Assistant Dairy Husbandman 

Gordon P. Percival, m.s.. Assistant Chemist 

Stuart Dunn, m.s.. Assistant Botanist 

Howard A. Rollins, m.s.. Assistant Horticulturist 

L. Phelps Latimer, ph.d.. Assistant Horticulturist 

Homer O. Stuart, m.s.. Assistant Poultry Husbandman 

Paul T. Blood, m.s.. Assistant Agronomist 

Leroy J. Higgins, b.s.. Assistant Agronomist 

James Macfarlane, Florist 

Albert D. Littlehale, Shepherd 

A. Gertrude Farr, b.s.. Research Assistant in Nutrition 

Edward J. Rasmussen, b.s., Research Assistant in Horticulture 

Elmer W. Lang, White Diarrhea Tester 

NiCHOLOS F. CoLOVOs, M.S., Assistant in Animal Nutrition 

Leon C. Glover, m.s.. Research Assistant in Entomology 

Maurice E. Bickford, b.s.. Assistant in Animal Nutrition 

Warren A. Westgate, m.s., Research Chemical Assistant in Entomology 

* Leave of absence, February 7 to June 11, 1930. 

t Leave of absence, October 1, 1929 to May 31, 1930. 

X Leave of absence, July 1, 1929 to September 1, 1930. 

16 



THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY 

Roland B. Dearborn, m.s., Assistant in Vegetable Gardening 

Max a. Campbell, b.s., Poultry Certification Inspector 

Roger C. Ham, Laboratory Technician in Poultry Husbandry 

Roland B. Dearborn, b.s., Graduate Assistant in Horticulture 

Carl E. Walker, b.s., Graduate Assistant in Forestry 

Harry L. Murray, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Botany 

James C. Fritz, b.s., Graduate Assistant in Agricultural and Biological 

Chemistry 
Samuel W. Hoitt, b.s., Graduate Assistant in Agricultural Economics 
Edward A. Dexter, b.s., Assistant Poultry Tester 

ASSISTANTS TO THE STAFF 

Henry B. Stevens, a.b., Executive Secretary 

William W. Shirley, b.s.. Librarian 

Raymond C. Magrath, Treasurer and Business Secretary 

Beatrice M. Richmond, Bookkeeper 

Elmer M. Rowalt, b.s. (Agr.), Editorial Assistant 

Elizabeth E. Mehaffey, Assistant Librarian and Mailing Clerk 

Betty I. Glidden, Seed Analyst and Stenographer 

Helen M. Hilton, Gas Analyst 



17 



EXTENSION SERVICE 

GENERAL EXTENSION STAFF 

Edward M. Lewis, litt.d., ll.d., President 

John C. Kendall, b.s., Director of Extension Service 

Earl P. Robinson, b.s., County Agent Leader 

Daisy D. Williamson, State Home Demonstration Leader 

*Harry C. Wood worth, m.s.. Farm Management Demonstrator 

Clarence B. Wadleigh, b.s,, State Leader, Boys' and Girls' Club Work 

George L. Waugh, b.s.. Agent in Dairying 

Henry B. Stevens, a.b., Executive Secretary 

Mary L. Sanborn, Assistant State Leader, Boys' and Girls' Club Work 

Ann F. Beggs, Home Management Specialist 

Howard A. Rollins, m.s.. Extension Horticulturist 

Francis L. McGettigan, b.s.. Extension Poultryman 

Ford S. Prince, b.s.. Extension Specialist in Soils and Crops 

Kenneth E. Barraclough, b.s., Extension Forester 

Max F. Abell, ph.d.. Assistant Farm Management Demonstrator 

Hazel E. Hill, b.s. (Educ), State Clothing Specialist 

Frank D. Reed, b.s.. Assistant in Agricultural Economics Research 

Elizabeth E. Ellis, b.s., m.a., State Nutrition Specialist 

COUNTY AGENTS 

Howard N. Wells, Sullivan County 
Wilfred R. Wilson, b.s., Grafton County 
Edward W. Holden, b.s., Merrimack County 
Daniel A. O'Brien, Coos County 
Everett W. Pierce, b.s., Hillsborough County 
James A. Purington, m.s., Rockingham County 
W. Leon FunkhousEjR, b.s., Cheshire County 
Eloi a. Adams, b.s., Stafford County 
Royal W, Smith, b.s., Belknap County 
Errol C. Perry, b.s., Carroll County 

Clarence S. Herr, b.s., Assistant County Agent in Cods and Grafton 
Counties 

COUNTY HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS 

Miriam Parmenter, Cheshire County 
Myrtis E. Beecher, Hillsborough County 
Ruth H. Sterling, b.s., Strafford County 
Ethel J. Robinson, b.s., SuUivan County 
Rena Gray, b.s., Belknap County 
Sarah A. Boucher, b.s., Coos County 
Una a. Rice, b.s., Grafton County 
Harriet W. Leach, b.s., Merrimack County 
E. Alice Melendy, b.s., Carroll County 

* Leave of absence, October 1, 1929 to May 31, 1930. 

18 



THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY 

COUNTY BOYS' AND GIRLS' CLUB AGENTS 

Kenneth E. Gibbs, b.s., Hillsborough County 

Stanley W. DeQuoy, Grafton County 

Elizabeth Bourne, Rockingham County 

Stanley E. Wilson, b.s., Belknap County 

Perley F. Ayer, b.s., Merrimack County 

Norman F. Whippen, b.s., Sullivan County 

Elizabeth Ricker, b.a., Strafford County 

Paul J. Dixon, b.s., Carroll County 

Edson F. Eastman, b.s.. Cods County 

Ruth C. Weston, b.a., Cheshire County 

Alice L. Fitch, b.s., Assistant County Club Agent in Hillsboro and 
Merrimack Counties 

Charlotte J. Fellows, b.s.. Assistant County Club Agent in Carroll and 
Cods Counties 

Alexander L. Guptill, b.s.. Assistant County Club Agent in Rocking- 
ham and Strafford Counties 

Isabelle Paige, b.s., Assistant County Club Agent in Grafton County 



19 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 

The University of New Hampshire was incorporated by an act of the 
state legislature on May 4, 1923. The new corporation included the old 
corporation known as the New Hampshire College of Agriculture and the 
Mechanic Arts and also provided for a College of Technology and a 
College of Liberal Arts. The act of incorporation took effect on July 1, 
1923. Under the provisions of the act of incorporation the trustees 
of the old corporation, the New Hampshire College of Agriculture and 
the Mechanic Arts, became the trustees of the University of New 
Hampshire. 

The administration of the University is in charge of a board of thirteen 
trustees, of which the governor of the state and the president of the 
University are ex officio members. The alumni elect two trustees, and 
the others are appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of 
the council. 

The original corporation, the New Hampshire College of Agriculture 
and the Mechanic Arts, was created by an act of the New Hampshire 
legislature in 1866 and was established at Hanover as a state institution 
in connection with Dartmouth College. The year 1868 saw the entrance 
of the first class. Before the college was founded, the state legislature of 
1863 had accepted the conditions of an act of the federal Congress of 
July 2, 1862, entitled, "An act donating public lands to the several states 
and territories which may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture 
and the mechanic arts," 

In 1893 the college was moved from Hanover to Durham. This ac- 
tion followed the death of Benjamin Thompson, a farmer of Durham, 
who died January 30, 1890, and left to the college, with the exception of a 
few minor reservations, his entire estate. The legislature accepted this 
bequest March 5, 1891, and appropriated the necessary money for the 
first buildings. 

Shortly before the state accepted this gift of Mr. Thompson's the 
legislature further provided for the college by accepting the provisions of 
an act of Congress known as the Morrill Bill. This legislation made 
available federal appropriations "for instruction in agriculture, the 
mechanic arts, the English language, and the various branches of 
mathematical, physical, natural and economic science, with special 
reference to their applications in the industries in life, and to the facilities 
for such instruction." 

20 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 

Although the college was able to make use of the Thompson land as 
early as 1893, it was not until 1910 that the income from this endowment 
of almost $800,000 became available. At present the college has an 
annual income from the Thompson funds of nearly $32,000. It also 
receives moneys which are available as the result of the acts of Congress 
referred to, and a yearly appropriation from the state amounting to one 
mill on the assessed valuation of the taxable property of the state. 

Although engineering instruction had been carried on in a Division of 
Engineering from the founding of the college, the work became unified 
and specialized when the College of Technology became one of the 
administrative units of the University in 1923. 

Study of the liberal arts had been offered before the change of nomen- 
clature of the corporation in 1923. The University of New Hampshire 
included a College of Liberal Arts, intended to care for the students who 
desired preparation for life in fields other than agriculture and en- 
gineering. 

Graduate study although not new to New Hampshire, as it had been 
carried on for some time under the direction of a faculty committee, was 
definitely organized in 1928 as a Graduate School. 

A branch of the University, known as the Agricultural Experiment 
Station, was established by the state August 4, 1887, under the act of 
Congress in March of that year. Its purpose is to acquire agricultural 
knowledge and to bring its information to the people of the state. The 
station is actively engaged in this work not only in Durham but through- 
out the commonwealth. Members of the faculty of the College of 
Agriculture serve on the station staff. 

In addition to its functions of teaching resident students and conduct- 
ing research investigations, the University has been developing rapidly 
during the past few years its function of carrying information and 
assistance in agriculture and home economics into all parts of the state. 
Funds appropriated for the University by acts of Congress and the state 
legislature provide the means for promoting this type of work. 



21 



SITUATION 



Durham, the home of the University, is an attractive village on the 
Portland division of the Boston and Maine railroad, sixty-two miles 
from Boston, fifty-four from Portland, and five from Dover, a city 
of 15,000 population. Good train service makes the University easily 
accessible from all parts of the state. 

Durham, organized in 1732, is one of the historic towns of New 
Hampshire. In the early days it was the home of a prosperous ship- 
building industry. Situated at the head of tidewater on the Oyster 
River, it served as a distributing center for the interior of the state. 
During the Revolutionary War it was famous as the home of General 
John Sullivan. Near his home, in the village, the state has erected a 
fitting monument to his memory. 

FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 



BUILDINGS FOR ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

Thompson Hall. — Main administration building. 

Morrill Hall. — Headquarters of the College of Agriculture. 

DeMeritt Hall. — Headquarters of the College of Technology. 

Conant Hall. — General classroom building. 

Dairy Building. — Equipped for dairy instruction. 

Shops. — Contain equipment essential for engineering instruction. 

Nesmith Hall. — Botany and experiment station building. 

Armory and Gymnasium. — Military science and physical education. 

Murkland Hall. — Headquarters of the College of Liberal Arts. 

Charles James Hall. — Chemistry building. 

Practice House. — Equipped as a practice house for home economics 
students. 

Hamilton Smith Library. — Made possible by union of funds left by 
Hamilton Smith of Durham for the erection of a town library building, 
from the Carnegie Corporation and the State of New Hampshire. The 
library serves not only the faculty and students of the University but 
also the residents of the town of Durham, being one of two such libraries 
in the United States so constituted, and because it is the library of the 
state university, it serves as far as possible the people of the State of 
New Hampshire. 

22 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

It contains, on the main floor, reading rooms, a small children's room, 
office, workrooms and a delivery room. On the second floor are a 
reserved book room, historical room and two study rooms, A three- 
story stack in the rear has accommodations for 50,000 volumes. Two 
basement rooms contain periodicals and an additional 10,000 volumes. 

Farm Buildings. — There are several large, well-equipped farm and 
other buildings adapted to the needs of the College of Agriculture. 

Power Plant. — This building houses the equipment necessary for heat- 
ing the University buildings. 

RESIDENTIAL HALLS 

Commons. — University dining hall. Dormitory on third floor for 
women students. 

Fairchild Hall. — Modern building furnishing accommodations for 150 
men. 

Ballard Hall. — Accommodates 50 women students. 

East and West Halls. — Men's dormitories for 230 students. 

Hetzel Hall. — Newest dormitory furnishing accommodations for 156 
men. 

Smith Hall. — Furnishes rooming facilities for 68 women. 

Congreve Hall. — Accommodates 100 women students. 

See folder on Residential Halls. 

EQUIPMENT 

Agronomy. — For the teaching of agricultural engineering, this depart- 
ment is provided with drainage levels for laying out drains, plane tables 
for making farm maps, polar planimeters for measuring plotted areas, a 
dynamometer and several other pieces of apparatus for studying draft 
problems. The machinery laboratory contains the original " Daniel 
Webster plow" and other primitive tools. It also contains many of 
the latest types of farm machinery, including plows, cultivators, har- 
rows, mowers, planters, corn and grain binders, a thresher, a tractor, a 
manure spreader, various makes of woven wire fences, etc. 

For farm crops work it has a very complete collection of dried speci- 
mens of the different forage crops, and of the more important varieties of 
corn, wheat and oats. Seed testing apparatus, grass charts, and other 
illustrative material form a part of the equipment. 

The lecture room is equipped with a combined lantern and reflecto- 
scope, together with a large number of lantern slides. 

23 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

The soil physics laboratory contains soil bins, a compacting machine, 
chemical and torsion balances and various kinds of physical apparatus 
for the study of soils, including that for the determination of specific 
gravity and for the making of mechanical analyses. 

The farm, with its 900 acres of land, has a variety of soils suited for 
the growth of various farm crops. 

Animal Husbandry. — The stock barn is thoroughly equipped with 
modern appliances. It houses a number of horses of the draft type, 
including a well-bred Percheron stallion. There are two small herds of 
beef cattle, milking Shorthorns, and Herefords, as well as a flock of pure- 
bred Shropshire sheep. 

The piggery of modern construction accommodates a small herd of 
Poland-China hogs. 

The class room is provided with a stereopticon lantern, and lantern 
slides are used to show the leading individuals of the different breeds of 
live stock. 

The herd books of the most prominent breeds are used for the purpose 
of familiarizing the students with the methods of tracing pedigrees and 
with the practice of breeders' associations. 

Architecture. — The department of architecture is well equipped to 
meet the needs of the subjects offered. The drafting rooms are supplied 
with tables and lockers, and the free-hand studio with suitable stands 
and easels. For free-hand drawing there is a good supply of geometric 
models, and for advanced work in charcoal drawing the nucleus of a good 
collection of plaster casts exists, consisting of historic ornament, details 
of plant and animal life and of the human form. For special work in 
this subject there is available the museum of casts, consisting of examples 
of antique and modern sculpture. For work in architectural drawing an 
excellent library of books and periodicals, and blue prints of all classes of 
buildings, are available for reference and use in the drafting rooms, 
while a goodly collection of samples of building materials is being added 
from time to time. 

Botany. — The department of botany has the usual laboratory equip- 
ment to meet the needs of the courses in general botany, plant physiol- 
ogy and bacteriology. In the advanced courses, owing to the connection 
of the department with the experiment station, students will find both 
the laboratory and green house equipment ample for critical studies in 
plant diseases and plant nutrition. 

24 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

Chemistry. — During the year 1929-30 the department of chemistry, 
together with agricultural chemistry, occupied the new building, Charles 
James Hall. 

Laboratories, equipment and recitation rooms, entirely modern in 
every respect, are provided for instruction in all fundamental courses. 
In addition ample facilities are available for advanced instruction and 
research work in general, analytical, physical, and organic chemistry. 
Besides the usual necessary apparatus such as glass and porcelain ware, 
balances, drying ovens and platinum ware, there is equipment for con- 
stant temperature work, magnetic susceptibility determinations, hydro- 
gen ion determinations, spectroscopic analysis and high and low voltage 
motor generator sets for electro-chemistry, etc. 

Dairy Husbandry. — The dairy husbandry laboratories, located in the 
dairy building, are well equipped for instructional purposes. The equip- 
ment includes power churn, power separator, pasteurizers, coolers, ice 
cream freezer, bottler, compressors and homogenizer. In the farm dairy 
room are farm separators and hand and small power churns. The milk 
testing and bacteriological laboratories have equipment necessary for 
testing and milk inspection, and dairy bacteriology. 

The University dairy herd is made up of representatives of the Ayr- 
shire, Guernsey, Holstein and Jersey breeds. 

Electrical Engineering. — The laboratories for electrical engineering 
occupy the ground floor of the south end of DeMeritt Hall. The main 
laboratory is used for testing electrical machinery, and contains a large 
distribution switchboard on which are mounted instruments, switches, 
circuit breakers, and plugging devices. These devices are so arranged 
that by making the proper connections thereto, direct current, and 
single-phase, two-phase, and three-phase alternating current of different 
voltages and frequencies, can be supplied to the various panels in the 
laboratory and to the lecture rooms in the building. In addition to this 
main laboratory there are others devoted to communication, storage 
batteries, and research. 

The general equipment includes various dynamos and motors for di- 
rect and alternating current, transformers, rectifiers, rotary converters, 
telephone, telegraph and radio communication equipment, an Evans 
demonstration equipment, arc lamps, storage batteries, and the neces- 
sary measuring instruments adapted to the needs of students taking this 
course. 

The lecture room of the department is equipped with a small panel 

25 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

board connected directly with the switchboard in the main laboratory, 
thus making it possible to supplement lectures with demonstrations. 

Farm Department. — The College of Agriculture has a large, well- 
equipped farm. It serves as a laboratory for much of the instruction in 
agriculture where approved methods and practices may be seen and 
where many students may gain experience by actually performing the 
work with their own hands. 

The several farms of the University total about 900 acres. Of this 
area about 90 acres are devoted to the campus and athletic fields; about 
200 acres are used for hay, tillage, orchards and gardens, about 300 
acres are forest, wood and brush land; about 300 acres are in pasture, 
and about 15 acres in ponds. 

Forestry. — The department of forestry offers a course of instruction 
which is intended to provide not only a special training in forestry, but 
also a broad general training in other lines of agriculture closely related 
to it. For those who desire to make forestry their life work, every 
encouragement and assistance will be given. Additional work at some 
graduate school of forestry is now almost a necessity, owing to the large 
number of men entering the profession. 

Durham is well situated with reference to the study of woodlot for- 
estry. All types of native second-growth forests are found near by, and 
the college owns a tract of 60 acres of old-growth timber where excep- 
tional opportunities are given for the study of mature forests. There 
are other areas where practice will be given in establishing plantations 
of forest trees by various methods. A nursery for the growing of seed- 
ling forest trees has been established. 

All the necessary instruments for making forest maps and measure- 
ments, together with collections of wood specimens, lantern slides and 
photographs, are available in connection with this work. 

Home Economics. — The home economics department is located in 
three large rooms in Thompson Hall. The food laboratory is furnished 
with individual desk equipment and cupboards for utensils and supplies. 
The sewing laboratory is equipped with tables, cupboards, and various 
types of sewing machines. The third room is equipped for weaving and 
textile study. The department also has a practice cottage. 

The Library. — The Hamilton Smith Library, by virtue of an agree- 
ment between the town of Durham and the then New Hampshire College 
in 1907, contains not only the books belonging to the University but also 

26 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

those of the Durham Library Association, the Durham Public Library 
and the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station. In each case 
these collections are increased by the body owning the books. 

The library collection includes 65,000 bound volumes. Fifteen 
hundred periodicals, continuations and proceedings of scientific societies 
are received currently. The main collections are housed in the Hamilton 
Smith Library. The volumes of the New Hampshire Agricultural 
Experiment Station are kept in Morrill Hall. Seventeen department 
libraries are maintained for the departments of the Colleges of Agri- 
culture and Technology. Periodicals appropriate to the department 
libraries are sent there. 

The library publications include The Library Handbook containing in- 
formation, directions for the use of the library and library tools, and 
library regulations; and the Library Lantern, a monthly news bulletin 
about books and libraries. These are free. 

The library attempts to provide all books needed for reading and 
research save the individual texts adopted for the various courses; to 
provide recreational reading of a wide and varied character including 
current, ephemeral and standard material of value; and to add gradually 
to its collections of the classics, serial sets, research and reference works. 

Mechanical Engineering Department. — This department is located 
in DeMeritt Hall. On the second and third floors are the advanced 
drawing and designing rooms. In addition to these drafting rooms there 
are two lecture rooms, and department offices. One of the lecture rooms 
is equipped with motion picture machines and stereopticon lantern and 
screen, for illustrated lectures. 

In the basement are located the mechanical engineering laboratories, 
in the north end of which is the materials testing laboratory, equipped 
with the apparatus needed in making analyses of flue gases, for calori- 
metric determinations of the heat values of solid and liquid fuels, and 
for conducting the usual tests of cement and concrete. There is also 
apparatus needed in determining the viscosity and flash points of 
lubricants as well as an oil testing machine for determining the lubricat- 
ing and wearing qualities of lubricants. This laboratory is also equipped 
with an electric oven for the heat treatment of steel and with torsion, 
tension and compression testing machines for determining the strengths 
of materials. 

The main room is given over to the testing of steam, gas and hydraulic 
machinery as well as of air compressors, air conditioning and heat 

27 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

transfer apparatus. This laboratory is equipped with machinery 
needed for such testing. There is also an ample supply of other appara- 
tus needed in conducting various tests and doing research work in various 

lines. 

The new power plant has been designed to serve also as a steam labo- 
ratory for this department. 

The wood shop is equipped with thirty-three benches, and complete 
wood working equipment for 160 students. 

The equipment of the machine shop consists of the modern complete 
apparatus found in an up-to-date commercial shop, and a large number 
of small tools, including micrometers, calipers and gauges necessary for 
accurate work. 

In the forge shop are seventeen Sturtevant down-draft forges, with 
anvils and necessary tools. 

Military Department. — Recognizing in military training a source of 
physical, mental, and moral development for the individual and a future 
safeguard for the nation, the University maintains two units of the 
Reserve Officers Training Corps. This corps, which is described in the 
later pages of the calatog, consists of over 127,000 students in all of the 
principal educational institutions of the country. It was organized by 
Congress in 1916 to provide systematic military training in civil institu- 
tions and to train specially selected students as reserve officers in the 
military forces of the United States. 

The training of the corps is under the supervision of the Secretary of 
War. Officers and non-commissioned officers of the Regular Army are 
detailed at the University for carrying on this training. The War De- 
partment loans all the necessary equipment of the latest type, so that 
with the exception of a few text-books required by advanced students, 
members of the R. O. T. C. are put to no expense for arms or equipment. 

In addition to the infantry and artillery equipment furnished by the 
government, there is a 75-foot indoor gallery practice rifle, a 100-inch 
outdoor machine gun and a 50-yard outdoor pistol range available for 
the use of students. The rolling country in the vicinity furnishes 
opportunity for extended order drill and field exercises, and the athletic 
field for close order drill. 

The cadets wear, when on duty of a military character, the olive drab 
uniform prescribed by standing orders of the War Department and 
furnished by the government. 

Upon the graduation of each class, those students who have satis- 

28 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

factorily completed the course receive commissions as second lieutenants 
in the officers reserve corps of the United States Army. 

Physics. — The department of physics is housed in the west end of 
DeMeritt Hall. In the basement is located the introductory physics 
laboratory with apparatus room, a photographic laboratory, a switch- 
board hall, a storage room and two small dark rooms for the individual 
work of the instructors. On the first floor is located the general physics 
laboratory and apparatus room, a recitation room and the department 
office. On the second floor is located the lecture room, with adjoining 
apparatus room. 

Instruction in physics is given primarily by recitations and labora- 
tories, with frequent lectures, examinations, written reports and per- 
sonal conferences. The aim of the department is to develop student 
minds capable of doing independent thinking in the science of physics. 
There is a small but well chosen collection of apparatus for use in labo- 
ratories and lectures. 

Poultry Husbandry. — The equipment of the poultry plant consists of 
a permanent laying house housing 1,000 birds; a 30 by 60 foot laying 
house housing 600 birds; a permanent long type brooder house capable 
of brooding 5,000 chicks; battery brooder rooms with a capacity of 4,000 
chicks to broiler age; an incubator cellar containing cabinet-type in- 
cubators of 1,400-egg and 3,000-egg capacity. Range shelters are also 
available for the poultry plant operation. 

The hens consist of Barred Plymouth Rocks, Single Comb Rhode Is- 
land Reds, Single Comb White Leghorns and Blue Andalusians. Addi- 
tional breeds will be added. A portion of the flock is trap-nested for 
instructional and breeding purposes. 

The poultry plant is operated for instructional and research purposes. 
Experiments are being conducted along the lines of feeding, breeding, 
brooding, with special emphasis on battery brooding, management, and 
diseases. 

A special poultry pathology laboratory is maintained for diagnosis 
and research in poultry diseases. This laboratory is available for stu- 
dent instructional purposes. 

Zoology. — The University is favorably situated geographically for the 
study of zoology. Within a few minutes' walk of the laboratory, the 
Oyster River meets the tide water from Great Bay. This furnishes a 
graduation of salt, brackish and fresh water with an abundance of their 

29 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

characteristic fauna. On the other hand, there are numerous bodies of 
fresh water, with typical fresh water forms. 

The department of zoology is prepared to offer courses in systematic 
zoology, physiology and sanitation, philosophical zoology, and anatomi- 
cal zoology. 

The equipment for the work in systematic zoology, consists of a 
well-lighted laboratory, provided with tables, charts, dissecting and 
compound microscopes. All of the latest books and periodicals on 
systematic zoology are at the student's disposal. 

The proximity to both salt and fresh water renders the work in ad- 
vanced systematic zoology unusually attractive. In addition to the 
regular collecting equipment, nets, aquaria, etc., advanced students also 
have the use of rowboats and a gasoline launch. 

In the work in physiology, hygiene and sanitation, the department is 
provided with an unusually fine collection of injected preparations of the 
human body, and with numerous charts. 

For work in evolution and experimental zoology the department has 
a very complete library. Studies in ecology in Great Bay and vicinity 
are encouraged, for which purpose the students have the use of a camera 
equipment. In addition to the study of evolution under natural con- 
ditions the department also furnishes aquaria for laboratory study and 
experiments. 

The work in anatomical zoology is greatly facilitated by an abun- 
dance of fresh material which may be collected as needed. For the 
study of human and comparative anatomy a full set of skeletons and 
preserved material is provided. Students interested in histology have 
access to a private collection of some two thousand microscope slides. 

Museum. — The museum had for a nucleus the collection made during 
the state geological survey. To this, additions have been made from 
various sources. Specimens are being collected to illustrate the zoology 
of New Hampshire, and New Hampshire collectors and naturalists are in- 
vited to make the museum the permanent depository of their collections. 



30 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



EXPENSES 

Estimate of Freshman Expenses 

High Average Low 

Room (Dormitories)* $120.00 $72.00 $63.00 

Board (at Commons) 215.00 215.00 215.00 

Tuition** 150.00 150.00 75.00anda 

scholarship 

Uniform f 

Books 35.00 35.00 35.00 

Laundry 35.00 20.00 15.00 

Incidentals t 100.00 60.00 50.00 

Total $655.00 $552.00 $453.00 

Expenses, Fall Term § $275.00 $225.00 $185.00 

Tuition — Four-Year Students. — Tuition is $150 a year for residents of 
New Hampshire and $250 for non-residents. For non-resident students 
who entered the University before the end of the college year 1927-28, 
the tuition is $225. Tuition is paid in advance in three equal install- 
ments, one on the first day of each term. 

A diploma fee of $5 is charged upon graduation. Charges will be 
assessed for extraordinary breakage or damage. No laboratory or 
course fees are charged. Payment of the tuition entitles the student 
(four-year, two-year) to admission to all varsity athletic games and 
contests. 

Tuition — Two-Year Students. — Tuition for two-year students in 
agriculture is $75 for residents of New Hampshire and $175 for non- 

* Send for bulletin on Residential Halls. 

** If a non-resident, add $100 to high and average and $175 to low. If a resident and 
not holding a scholarship, add $75 to low. 

t Uniform for members of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps is provided by the 
federal government. A deposit of $15 is required in advance of each student having 
military equipment in his possession. 

% Expenses for travel, clothing, etc., vary with the individual student, and should be 
added. The subscription price to The New Hampshire, the college paper, is $1.50 per 
year. Subscriptions are taken during registration at the opening of the college year. 
Provision should also be made for participation in other student enterprises. 

§ Board and incidentals are largest the Fall Term, and deposit for uniform is required 
then. Hence the greater proportional expense. 

31 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

residents. Tuition is payable in advance in three equal installments, 
pne on the first day of each term. 

Books. — Students may purchase books, drawing instruments, ma- 
terials, etc., at the University bookstore in Thompson Hall. 

Rooms. — The University has three dormitories for women and four for 
men. All rooms are heated, lighted and furnished. Bed linen, quilts 
and towels, however, are provided by the individual student. Each 
women's dormitory is equipped with a laundry. In many cases, three 
students occupy a suite of rooms. Prices range from $60 to $120 a 
year for each student. Applications for rooms in the dormitories should 
be addressed to The Registrar, University of New Hampshire, Durham. 

A Five Dollar ($5.00) Room Deposit must accompany each applica- 
tion, this deposit to be forfeited if the room accepted is not occupied by 
the applicant. The deposit is held as a guarantee against breakage and 
will be returned at the close of the year or upon withdrawal. 

Room rent is payable in advance in three equal installments, one on 
the first day of each term except as noted below. 

Rooms reserved will be held only until September 1st unless one-third 
of the annual rent is paid before that date. 

Rooms paid for and not occupied one day after registration may be 
declared vacant and the room rent returned, unless the individual having 
the reservation makes a written request to the Registrar to hold the 
room until a later date. The advance payment for the room will not be 
returned to those making this special request. No room will be re- 
served more than ten days after the registration date. Early applica- 
tion is necessary in order to secure a choice of rooms. Rooms in private 
dormitories or families may be secured for about the same prices as 
for those in college dormitories. 

Women students, unless living at home, are required to room in one 
of the women's dormitories, or in approved houses. A competent 
matron is in charge of each women's dormitory. 

Board. — A Dining Hall is operated and supervised by the University 
for the accommodation and benefit of the students. All freshmen, 
whose homes are not located in Durham or who are not residents of 
Durham, will be required to board at the University Dining Hall. The 
aim of the compulsory regulation is to insure a broad fellowship in the 
class, and to safeguard the health of the first-year students by offering 
skilled dietetic oversight in the selection and preparation of their food. 

32 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The Dining Kail is equipped with the best appliances for cooking and 
serving on a large scale, and is subject to constant sanitary inspection 
by the University Physician. Board is $215 for the college year, pay- 
able $75 at registration for the first term, and $70 at registration for 
each of the second and third terms. 

A cafeteria is open for all students of the upper classes who may de- 
sire to take advantage of the low price and the high quality of food 
available at the University Dining Hall. 

Health Service. — The Health Department with the University 
Physician in charge is devoted to the prevention of sickness and the 
maintenance of the health and efficiency of the students. The Univer- 
sity maintains an infirmary with a matron and a trained nurse in charge. 

Checking Accounts. — Students are earnestly urged to arrange check- 
ing accounts in their home banks in order to avoid possible loss re- 
sulting from keeping on hand considerable amounts of money. The 
Business Office will accept and cash student checks. Such banking 
arrangements will also facilitate payment of registration bills which are 
strictly due and payable on registration day. 

Self-Support. — A great many students earn their education in part by 
means of their own labor during summers and while in college. An em- 
ployment bureau for men is maintained by the Young Men's Christian 
Association, and inquiries from the men should be addressed to the Secre- 
tary, Christian Work, Inc., Durham, N. H. The employment bureau 
cannot promise work to a student, because in so small a town as Durham 
there is not enough work to go around. In the fall and spring terms fresh- 
men can get work several afternoons a week doing such odd jobs or chores 
as taking care of lawns, gardens, furnaces, etc. By the end of freshman 
year they may reasonably hope to get a steady job such as waiting on 
table, serving as janitor in one of the University buildings, etc. But 
students are urged not to count too much upon earning their way the 
first year, and should be sure of at least $400, a low estimate of the first 
year's expense, from other sources. 

Employment for the girls is in the hands of the Dean of Women, and 
inquiries from girls should be addressed to her. 

UNIVERSITY AID TO STUDENTS 

Scholarships. — A limited number of scholarships are awarded an- 
nually for the purpose of aiding deserving students. In order to grant 
scholarships equitably the University requires full information of all 

33 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

applicants relative to the necessity for scholarship aid. Scholarship ap- 
plication blanks will be provided upon request to the Dean of the Faculty. 

These scholarships will be forfeited at any time for misconduct. They 
will also be withdrawn from students in four-year courses who fail to 
secure an average grade of 60 during any one term, and only in cases of 
special financial necessity will they be restored by the President. 

Scholarships furnished by the state may be granted to students who 
have attended college for less than three terms. 

A more detailed description of the several classes of scholarships fol- 
lows: 

Conant Scholarships. — These scholarships provided by the bequest of 
John Conant, of JafiFrey, pay $75 at present and are good for one year. 
By the terms of the bequest they are open to men taking agricultural 
courses and preference is given to residents of Cheshire County. Ap- 
plication should be made to the Dean of the Faculty. 

Lougee Scholarships. — Beginning in 1921 the interest on $5,000 be- 
queathed by Amos D. Lougee of Somersworth, N. H., has been expended 
for scholarships of $75 each. They will be assigned each year and will 
be good for one year only. No applications can be approved without 
satisfactory evidence that the candidates would be unable to attend with- 
out the aid of the proposed scholarships. Until July 15 of each year, 
preference will be given to residents of Strafford County. 

Application should be made direct to the Dean of the Faculty. 

Valentine Smith Scholarships. — Through the generosity of Hamilton 
Smith of Durham, the sum of $10,000 has been given to establish the 
Valentine Smith scholarships. 

"The income thus accruing shall be given to the graduates of an 
approved high school or academy who shall, upon examination, be 
judged to have the most thorough preparation for admission." 

Competitive examinations for this scholarship will be held in Thomp- 
son Hall at the University, September 16 and 17, 1930. Examinations 
will commence at 10 a. m. on Tuesday. Contestants must present the 
usual credentials fulfilling the requirements for entrance, and must pass 
examinations in English, American History, Algebra (through quadrat- 
ics), Plane Geometry and either Physics or Chemistry. 

Requests for examinations should be forwarded to the Dean of the 
Faculty at least one week before the beginning of the examination period, 
and must state the names and addresses of the students, and the ex- 
aminations desired. 

34 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Examinations are not restricted to residents of the state. 

Class Memorial Scholarships. — In accordance with a communication 
presented to the trustees by the Alumni Association in 1922, each class 
upon graduation establishes a fund of $3,000, the interest of which will 
be used in payment of a class scholarship, to be awarded by a committee 
appointed by the President. The respective classes shall forward recom- 
mendations to this committee which will investigate such recommenda- 
tions before awarding the scholarships. 

Scholarships shall be limited to candidates of the highest moral 
standards, physically sound, and preference shall be given to those who 
require financial aid in order to continue their education, and shall be 
dependent upon the same factors as govern the holding of other scholar- 
ships as regards grades. 

Eighteen classes, 1922 to 1940, will establish these scholarships, and 
each scholarship shall be dedicated to the name of one of the eighteen 
New Hampshire men who died in the service of his country during the 
World War. Six classes have established their scholarships to date. 

They are: Forrest Eugene Adams Scholarship, Class of 1922; Paul 
Edward Corriveau Scholarship, Class of 1923; Pitt Sawyer Willand 
Scholarship, Class of 1924; George Downes Parnell Scholarship, Class of 
1925; Cyril Thomas Hunt Scholarship, Class of 1926; Donald Whitney 
Libby Scholarship, Class of 1927. 

Ralph D. Hetzel Inter scholastic Debating Scholarships. — The Board of 
Trustees of the University on Dec. 20, 1926, set aside three scholarships 
each year for three years to be awarded to the three interscholastic 
debaters who should qualify under regulations defined by the Inter- 
scholastic Debating League or by the University. These scholarships 
are limited to residents of New Hampshire. 

Hunt Scholarship. — A special scholarship paying $75 has been estab- 
lished by the trustees at the request of the United States War Depart- 
ment for the benefit of soldiers, or sons and daughters of soldiers, in 
the United States Army. This scholarship is named in honor of Colonel 
William E. Hunt, New Hampshire 1899, aqd Colonel Charles A. Hunt, 
New Hampshire 1901, who have rendered conspicuous and gallant serv- 
ice as officers of the Regular Army before and during the World War. 
This scholarship will be granted each year and will be good for one year 
only. Application should be made direct to the Dean of the Faculty. 
The conditions laid down on the application form must be carefully ob- 
served by the candidate. After being filled out and properly signed, it 

35 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

should be sent to the Dean of the Faculty. Upon approval, a scholar- 
ship will be forwarded to the candidate. The application cannot be 
approved without satisfactory evidence that the candidate would be 
unable to attend without the aid of the proposed scholarship. Preference 
will be given to a New Hampshire soldier. 

Concord Alumni Scholarship Fund. — The Concord Branch of Alumni 
of the University of New Hampshire recently voted to begin the estab- 
lishment of a scholarship fund. For the present, in accordance with the 
suggestion of the Concord Branch, money paid in from year to year will 
be employed as a part of the Student Loan Fund of the University. 
Ultimately, the principal and such interest as accrues will be transferred 
to a special scholarship fund. 

Frank B. Clark Fund. — A trust fund of $10,000 has been provided by 
Frank B. Clark of Dover, N. H., the income of which is to be used for 
the purpose of assisting and encouraging needy and worthy students who 
are suffering from physical impairment or deformity. 

"Students impaired by the loss of an arm shall receive prior con- 
sideration." 

"The benefits of this gift are to be available to students in any sec- 
ondary school or college except a secondary school or college which is 
under the direction or control of a church or religious affiliations or 
preferences, and with the further understanding that students at the 
University of New Hampshire shall be given prior consideration." 

Dads' Hetzel Scholarship Fund. — At the second annual Dads' Day at 
the University, the fathers present voted to establish a scholarship fund 
to be known as The Dads' Hetzel Fund and subscribed $304. For the 
present this money will be employed as a part of the Student Loan Fund 
of the University. Ultimately the principal and such interest as accrues 
will be transferred to a special scholarship fund. 

Distribution of Loan and Scholarship State Assistance Funds by 
the Loan Committee. — For the present " Cash Loans" will be granted 
to needy Juniors and Seniors and " Deferred Tuition Loans" to needy 
Sophomores. "Free Scholarships" and " Deferred Tuition Loans" will 
be granted to needy Freshmen and Two-Year Agricultural Students. 

Exceptions to the above procedure may be made by vote of the Loan 
Committee. 

Cash Loan Fimd. — Money will be loaned to needy Juniors and Sen- 
iors who are economical in their expenditures and who are working to 

36 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

pay a portion of their expenses. These loans will bear interest at 2 per 
cent until graduation or withdrawal from the University, and 5 per cent 
after graduation or withdrawal. 

D. A. R. Loan Fund. — The Daughters of the American Revolution of 
New Hampshire have recently created a "Student Loan Fund" for the 
benefit of students of any educational pursuit. This fund is adminis- 
tered by the Student Loan Fund Committee of the University. 

The John H. Pearson Trust. — In cooperation with the trustees of the 
John H. Pearson Estate, Concord, N. H., a student loan fund known as 
The John H. Pearson Trust has been established, and is administered 
under the conditions governing the University Loan Fund. 

Deferred Tuition Loans. — In order to enable students to attend the 
University, who would be unable to do so without the aid of a loan, the 
University will grant loans to be applied toward tuition up to $100 in 
each college year. These loans will bear interest at the rate of 2 per cent 
until graduation or withdrawal from the University, and 5 per cent after 
graduation or withdrawal, and are payable as follows: $5 a month begin- 
ning one year after graduation or withdrawal; $10 a month beginning 
two years after graduation or withdrawal; $15 a month, beginning three 
years after graduation or withdrawal, etc. 

Free Scholarships. — To aid students who need and deserve financial 
assistance, the trustees award 200 free scholarships annually to residents 
of New Hampshire. Each scholarship pays $75 per year, and is good for 
one year only. 

Applications for these scholarships must be returned to the Dean of 
the Faculty not later than July 15. 

Recommendations for free scholarships may be made by the subordi- 
nate and Pomona Granges, state senators. State Federation of Women's 
Clubs, and citizens of New Hampshire. 

Upon investigation and approval scholarships will be granted to those 
whose need appears to the committee to be the greatest. 

PRIZES ^ 

Bailey Prize. — Dr. C. H. Bailey of Gardner, Mass., and E. A. Bailey, 
B.S., of Keene, N. H., offer a prize of ten dollars for proficiency in 
chemistry. 

Erskine Mason Memorial Prize. — Mrs. Erskine Mason of Stamford, 
Conn., has invested one hundred dollars as a memorial to her son, a 

37 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

member of the class of 1893, the income of which is to be given, for the 
present, to that member of the senior class who has made the greatest 
improvement during his course. 

Inter scholastic Debating Prize. — The University of New Hampshire 
Debating League was reorganized in 1921, and is under the direction of 
the instructor in debating and public speaking in the University. Any 
secondary school of the state is eligible for membership. Preliminary 
contests are conducted at the schools, and a final contest is held at the 
University to determine the winner of the League. A prize cup is 
awarded in rotation to the winners. Other prizes, such as medals and 
certificates, are awarded to individual debaters from time to time. 

Inter scholastic Prize Speaking Contest. — This contest, for students of 
any accredited high school of the state (provided they have not already 
won the first prize in a previous year) was first held in May, 1912. 
Three prizes of the value of thirty dollars are provided by the University 
for the winners. 

University Inter- Fraternity Scholarship Cup for Men. — Through the 
generosity of Wilford A. Osgood, '14, a cup is donated which is to be 
awarded each year to that four-year University fraternity whose mem- 
bers have the highest scholastic standing as certified by the Registrar. 

The cup will belong permanently to that fraternity winning it three 
times in succession. 

Fraternities eligible to compete for this cup must have been members 
of Casque and Casket for at least two years and must have been active 
on the campus during that length of time. 

Diettrich Cup. — This cup was given by the class of 1916 in memory of 
Rosina Martha Diettrich, a member of that class, who died a few weeks 
before graduation. The cup is to be awarded each year to the girl who 
attains the highest scholarship in her junior year. The cup is to remain 
in her possession throughout her senior year and until the next winner is 
named. 

The American Legion Award. — The New Hampshire department of 
the American Legion as a mark of recognition of the University's con- 
tribution in the World War, and as an expression of its interest in na- 
tional defense offers yearly a medal to that man in the senior class who 
has attained the highest distinction determined by achievement in mili- 
tary science, athletics, and scholarship. To be eligible for this award the 

38 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

candidate in military science must have demonstrated outstanding 
ability as a leader and must have revealed qualities of devotion and 
loyalty. In athletics he must have displayed an active interest as a 
participant or as a manager for at least two years. The candidate must 
have attained a scholastic standing in the upper one-fourth of the senior 
men of the college in which the candidate is registered. From the per- 
sons meeting these conditions, the committee will select that candidate 
who, in its judgment, is deemed most worthy. The name of the winner 
will be inscribed on a trophy. This trophy, made possible by the gen- 
erosity of the American Legion of this state, is to remain in the per- 
manent possession of the University. 

Katherine DeMeritt Memorial Prize. — Dean Elizabeth P. DeMeritt 
has offered a prize of $20, in memory of her daughter of the class of 1908, 
to that junior girl who, during her three years in college, has shown the 
greatest aptitude for helpful leadership and cheerful loyalty combined 
with strength of character and scholastic attainments. (Established 
1923.) 

Bartlett Prize. — Former Governor John H. Bartlett (New Hampshire, 
1920, honorary) of Portsmouth, N. H., offers a prize of $50 each year, to 
be awarded at Commencement to that New Hampshire student, a mem- 
ber of the junior class, who ranks highest in scholarship for the year 
among those young men who have earned at least one-half their expenses 
since entering the University. This prize was awarded first in June, 
1921. 

Chi Omega Prize. — Mu Alpha Chapter of Chi Omega awards an 
annual prize of ten dollars at Commencement to the undergraduate 
woman student of the University who shall submit to the Committee 
on Award the best thesis on any subject dealing with problems of civic 
interest in Sociology or Economics. The title shall be approved by the 
head of the department concerned and the thesis shall be received, not 
later than June first, and graded by a joint committee composed of the 
heads of departments of Sociology, Economics and English. If, how- 
ever, no thesis is found by the committee to deserve the award, no prize 
shall be given. 

Class of 1899 Prize. — The. class of 1899 has given to the University a 
fund of $500, the income to be used as a cash prize to be awarded "by 
the Faculty to the senior who in their opinion has developed the highest 
ideals of good citizenship." 

39 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Phi Mu Medal. — The local chapter of Phi Mu offers a gold medal 
to a senior girl to be awarded on the following basis: 50 points for 
excellence in physical education, determined by both skill and the spirit 
in which the work is carried; the remaining 50 j^oints must be attained 
by evidence of unusual scholastic capacity, democracy, loyalty, and 
helpfulness in college associations and activities. No candidate will be 
considered who does not have an average grade for her college work 
above 80. 

Phi Sigma Prize. — In order to promote high scholarship in Zoology 
and the allied sciences, the Phi Sigma national honorary fraternity offers 
a prize of $25 to be awarded at Commencement to that senior who shall 
rank highest in zoological subjects throughout the entire four years of 
collegiate work. The amount of work carried in Biology, together with 
the average grade in all other subjects shall be considered in making this 
award. (First offered June, 1922.) 

Hood Prizes. — Through the kindly interest and generosity of Charles 
H. Hood of the class of 1880, the income of funds given to the University 
in 1921 and in 1924 will be used for the encouragement, aid, and benefit 
of deserving students. 

In accordance with the suggestions of the donor, for the present the 
income will be expended as follows: 

F'irst. Hood Achievement Prize. — A gold medal will be awarded an- 
nually to that member of the senior class whom the members of the three 
upper classes choose as giving the greatest promise of becoming a worthy 
factor in the outside world through his character, scholarship, physical 
qualifications, personal popularity, leadership and usefulness as a man 
among men. 

Second. Hood Dairy Prizes. — A part of the Hood income will be de- 
voted each year to paying a portion of the expenses of the members of a 
team or teams chosen for excellence in judging dairy cattle and sent to 
participate in intercollegiate or other dairy contests. Also suitable 
medals will be provided for the individual members of such teams. 

Third. Hood Supplementary Bequest. — The income from this bequest 
will be used for the purchase of a suitably inscribed trophy to become the 
property of the University. The names of the winners of prizes in dairy 
cattle judging are to be inscribed annually upon this trophy which will 
thus serve as a permanent record to the institution of their skill and 
accomplishments. 

40 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The Fair child Memorial Prizes. — In 1927 Mask and Dagger, the 
dramatic society of the University of New Hampshire, established two 
prizes of twenty-five dollars each to be awarded at each Commence- 
ment to the two seniors who have done the most to promote dramatics 
during their four years at the University. One prize is awarded for 
excellence in acting, and one for excellence in the technical phases of play 
production. These prizes are given in memory of Edward T. Fairchild, 
late president of the University. 

Thomas J. Davis Prize. — By gift of Thomas J. Davis, Duluth, Minn., 
a native and former resident of Durham, a fund has been provided for 
the establishment of Dairy and Household Science prizes as follows: 

First. For competitive judging of dairy cattle by "Short Course 
Students," excluding all four-year students, and allowing a suitable 
handicap in favor of students who are taking a course of not more than 
four months. 

Second. To young women taking a short course for competitive 
bread baking as a half unit and for dairy butter making as another half 
unit. 

Alpha Xi Delta Cup. — A cup will be awarded annually by the Alpha 
Xi Delta sorority to the senior girl who proves herself to be the best 
athlete in her class. The cup will be awarded on consideration of the 
following qualifications: good sportsmanship, physical fitness, athletic 
achievements, and superior skill. The cup will be awarded by a board 
of judges including the members of the department of Physical Educa- 
tion for Women, the president of the W^omen's Student Government and 
the president of the Women's Athletic Association. 

Mask and Dagger Achievement Prize. — In 1929, Mask and Dagger 
established an annual prize of twenty-five dollars to be known as the 
Mask and Dagger Achievement Prize. It is awarded each year to the 
senior who, during his college course, has made the most outstanding 
artistic contribution to the dramatic work of the University. 

Edward Monroe Stone Cup. — This handsome cup, presented in 1929 
by Edward Monroe Stone, Class of 1892, is awarded annually to any 
fraternity or sorority for superior ability in intra-mural forensics. The 
debates are conducted by the local chapter of Tau Kappa Alpha, whose 
plans and methods relative to the awarding of the cup, are subject to the 
approval of the instructor in charge of forensics. The cup will become 
the permanent possession of any fraternity or sorority winning it three 
times in succession. 

41 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Psi Lambda Cup. — Psi Lambda, the Home Economics Club, each year 
awards a cup to the Plome Economics senior who has shown the greatest 
improvement in personality and scholarship during her four years in 
college. 

Alpha Chi Omega Prize. — A ten dollar prize will be awarded annually 
by Alpha Tau Chapter of Alpha Chi Omega to the undergraduate student 
of the University who submits to the head of the Department of English 
the best informal essay of less than three thousand words. The title 
may be chosen by the student. The essay must be submitted before 
June 1. 

Delta Chi Trophy. — Delta Chi, honorary mathematics society, will 
present, at the end of each academic year, a silver cup to that member of 
the sophomore class, eligible for membership in the society, who during 
two years' courses in mathematics has demonstrated valuable mathe- 
matical ability, by ranking as one of the five high students in mathemat- 
ics. General scholastic standing and personality shall also figure in 
determining the award. A committee consisting of the Dean of the 
College of Technology, the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, the head 
of the Department of Mathematics, the president of Delta Chi, and one 
other student member of the society shall determine the winner in each 
year. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Publications. — The New Hampshire, a weekly newspaper 
giving undergraduate and alumni news. 

The Granite, an annual issued by the junior class. 

Student Council. — The Council is arbiter in all inter-class affairs 
affecting the student body and regulates intra-mural activities. 

Young Men's Christian Association. 

Young Women's Christian Association. 

Christian Work. — Christian community service is encouraged by 
various activities, including a reception to new students; publishing a 
handbook which is given to all new students; operating an employment 
bureau; providing a second-hand text-book exchange; and maintaining a 

club room. 

The Advisory Board for Christian Work employs an inter-church 
student's pastor and a women's secretary. They cooperate with the 
Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. in the promotion of their work, as well as in 

42 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

carrying definite responsibility for the pastoral work among the students. 
Generous contributions are received yearly from the Baptist, Congrega- 
tional, Methodist Episcopal and Presbyterian organizations and the 
State Committee of the Y. M. C. A. Everything possible is done in a 
social and pastoral way for the students of all religious denominations, 
whether Protestant, Catholic or Hebrew. 

Athletic Association. — Every undergraduate automatically becomes a 
member of the Association upon enrollment in the University by paying 
the regular fees. This entitles each student to admission to all home 
varsity athletic games. 

Musical Clubs. — The musical clubs include: Men's Glee Club, 
Women's Glee Club, Orchestra, and Band. 

The Association of Women Students. — It includes all women students 
of the University who, with faculty advisors, formulate and enact the 
rules governing women students. 

Agricultural Club. — The primary object of this club is to discuss 
agricultural topics of scientific interest, and to provide a common 
meeting-ground for all agricultural students. 

Mask and Dagger. — An honorary dramatic society which presents 
annually three dramatic productions. 

Alpha Chi Sigma. — Composed of men who are to take up some branch 
of chemistry as their life work. Membership is honorary. 

Alpha Zeta. — The professional honorary fraternity of agricultural 
students. 

Book and Scroll. — ^A literary society composed of honor students 
in English. 

Iota Chi. — The honorary journalistic society of the University. 

Phi Sigma. — A national honorary biological fraternity, founded in 
1915, for the purpose of promoting interest in research in the biological 
sciences. 

Phi Lambda Phi. — An honorary physics society, whose members are 
students of high standing in physics. 

Le Cerclc Franjais. — This society was established in the spring of 
1919 to offer competent students an opportunity to acquire a speaking 
knowledge of the French language. 

43 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Phi Kappa Phi. — A national honorary fraternity founded in 1897 for 
the purpose of promoting the highest grade of scholarship. A chapter 
was established at the University in 1922. Its membership consists of 
the upper 15 per cent of the senior class. Members are elected at the 
beginning of the first and third terms. 

Casque and Casket. — This society is composed of students of the 
upper classes, having an equal number of members from each fraternity. 
The group regulates all inter-fraternity relations on the campus. 

Pan Hellenic. — This organization transacts all business of common 
interest to the women's fraternities. 

Forestry Club. — This organization was formed to bring together 
students who are interested and are specializing in the study of forestry. 

Tau Kappa Alpha. — A national honorary debate and oratory society. 

Kappa Delta Pi. — Organized in 1926 to foster the interests of profes- 
sional education as a local society. Later received charter as a chapter 
of Kappa Delta Pi, national education society. 

Student Branch of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers. 

Student Branch of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 

Student Branch of the American Society of Civil Engineers. 

Alpha Sigma. — Organized in 1925 as an honorary architectural society. 

Delta Chi. — Founded in 1925, and includes high ranking students in 
Mathematics. 

Psi Lambda. — An honorary society for students in Home Economics. 

N. H. Club. — Includes as members all male students who have earned 
a varsity athletic letter. 

Scabbard and Blade. — Local chapter of the national honorary military 
fraternity. 



44 



METHODS OF ADMISSION 



Provided the special requirements of the separate colleges are fully 
met, the University will admit without examination properly prepared 
New Hampshire students who are graduates of high schools or academies 
of New Hampshire that are approved by the State Board of Education, 
or those who are graduates of other specially approved schools. 

The number of persons, not residents of New Hampshire, admitted 
each year is determined by vote of the Trustees and the following State 
law: 

"The number of new students entering the University of New Hamp- 
shire from the states of Maine, Massachusetts, and Vermont shall not 
exceed eight per cent of the total enrollment of the entering class of the 
four-year course of the preceding University year; and the enrollment of 
new students, exclusive of those from the States of New Hampshire, 
Maine, Massachusetts and Vermont, shall not exceed four per cent of the 
total enrollment of the entering class of the four-year course of the pre- 
ceding year." 

Applicants for admission to the University will be required to submit 
two application forms: (1) an "admission credential" blank filled out 
by the headmaster or principal of the secondary school from which they 
are graduated; (2) a "personal statement" blank filled out by the ap- 
plicant. These blanks are distributed through New Hampshire and 
other secondary school officials or they may be secured by application to 
the Dean of the Faculty, at Durham, to whom all such blanks should be 
forwarded. 

In order to give ample time for the selection of the limited number of 
out-of-state students allowed, and for full investigation of New Hamp- 
shire applicants of doubtful preparation, it is desirable that applicants 
for admission, both from within and without the state, should forward 
their personal statements and credentials as early as April 1, it being 
understood that the preparatory school work will be completed in June. 
Credentials should cover work done as nearly as possible up to March 1, 
and they are not desired before that date. Personal statements, how- 
ever, may be forwarded at any preceding time. 

Applicants whose records do not give evidence of capacity, disposi- 
tion and preparation adequate for successful college study may be 
required to withdraw their applications. In so far as is practicable, 
officers of the University will arrange for personal conferences with such 
applicants. 

45 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman class of each college must 
show evidence, either by credential or by examination, that they are pre- 
pared in fifteen units as indicated in the following table. 

An entrance unit represents one study of four or five recitations a 
week for one year. It is assumed that two hours of manual training or 
laboratory work are equivalent to one hour of classroom work. 

College of College of College of 
Agricul- Liberal Tech- 
Required Units ture Arts nology 

Group A English 3 3 3 

Group B ♦§ Mathematics 2 2 3 

Group C Social Science and His- 
tory 1 1 1 

Group D Natural Science 1 1 1 

Group E Foreign languages 

Group F Vocational subjects 

7 7 8t 

Elective Units 8 8 7 

Total for admission 15 15 15 

Elective units may be off"ered from all groups, including a fourth year 
of English. 

Entrance examinations will be given at the University at the time of 
opening in September. Requests for these examinations should be 
forwarded to the Dean of the Faculty at least one week in advance. 

Cases not covered by the above statements will be decided by the 
entrance committee of the faculty. 

Candidates for advanced standing may be admitted on the basis of the 
work completed at the institution from which they come. 

Every candidate for admission to the University shall be required to 

* A candidate for admission to the College of Liberal Arts who offers two units in a 
single foreign language may substitute for the two units required in Mathematics two 
additional units in subjects named in groups A, C, D and E above. 

§ Two years of mathematics (one year of Algebra and one year of Plane Geometry) 
are required for the Business Fundamentals Course. 

t Students entering the College of Technology must offer 15 units, three of which 
should be in Mathematics including Algebra, Plane and Solid Geometry, but students 
offering only two units of Mathematics including Algebra and Plane Geometry may be 
admitted conditioned in one unit of Mathematics. 

46 



METHODS OF ADMISSION 

procure a statement, signed by the town or city clerk, to the effect that 
the father or legal guardian is a resident of the town or city and state 
from which he purports to register. Students admitted from foreign 
countries or states other than New Hampshire shall be deemed to be 
non-resident students throughout the entire University course unless 
and until the parents or legal guardian shall have gained residence in 
New Hampshire. 

Admission of non-resident candidates will be by selection, and only 
records of good grade will be considered; character, leadership, alertness, 
etc., will also be taken into account. Because of the large number of 
New Hampshire students needing financial assistance in the way of 
work, only a very limited number of applications can be considered 
which do not give evidence of reasonable financial backing. 

FRESHMAN WEEK 

Freshman Week was instituted at the University of New Hampshire in 
1924. It is evident from a study of the results of the activities of this 
"week" that it has served as a valuable means of adjusting freshmen to 
their new environment, of creating right attitudes towards college work 
and of minimizing the usual lost motion during the first few weeks of the 
regular term. By means of so-called "placement tests" the students 
will be sectioned according to their abilities and aptitudes. The week 
also affords an opportunity for the students to learn to know each other, 
to organize their efforts, to work together, to play together, and to 
become acquainted with the campus, the buildings, the faculty and 
with the courses of study and the traditions of the University. 

Attendance of all freshmen throughout Freshman Week, beginning 
Tuesday, September 16, and continuing through Saturday, September 
20, will be obligatory. Any prospective candidate for the freshman class 
who is absent from the exercises beginning on September 16 will seri- 
ously imperil his admission to the University. 

REQUIREMENTS IN DETAIL 

GROUP A. ENGLISH 

All candidates will be required to write a series of short themes which 
will show an intelligent appreciation of certain great English classics. 
The classics selected are as follows: Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice; 
Twelfth Night; and Hamlet; Dickens' Tale of Two Cities; George Eliot's 

47 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Silas Marner; Macaiilay's Life of Johnson; Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies; 
and the best known poems of Wordsworth, Longfellow and Whittier. 

Stress will be laid upon the form as well as upon the content of the 
paper submitted by the candidate. 

As a special test in spelling, grammar, punctuation and paragraphing, 
the candidate will be required to write a short theme upon some subject 
pertaining to the home or school life of the average high school senior. 

An optional question will be offered for the purpose of discovering the 
candidate's familiarity with the best modern periodical literature. 

GROUP B. MATHEMATICS 

1. Elementary Algebra. — The four fundamental operations for 
rational algebraic expressions. Factoring, determination of highest 
common factor and least common multiple by factoring. Fractions, 
including complex fractions, and ratio and proportion. Linear and 
quadratic equations, both numerical and literal. Problems depending 
on linear and quadratic equations. Radicals, including the extraction 
of the square root of polynomials and of numbers. Exponents, includ- 
ing the fractional and negative. 

2. Advanced Algebra. — The formula for the «th term and the sum of 
the terms of arithmetical and geometrical progressions, with applications. 
The theory and use of logarithms, without involving the use of infinite 
series. The binomial theorem for positive integral exponents. Com- 
plex numbers, with graphical representation of sums and differences. 
Determinants limited to simple cases. The elements of the theory of 
equations. 

3. Plane Geometry. — The usual theorems and constructions of good 
text-books, including the general properties of plane rectilineal figures; 
the circle and measurement of angles; similar polygons; areas; regular 
polygons, and the measurement of the circle. The solution of numerous 
original exercises, including loci problems. Applications to the measure- 
ment of lines and plane surfaces. 

4. Solid Geometry. — The usual theorems and constructions of good 
text-books, including the relations of lines and planes in space; the 
properties and measurement of prisms, pyramids, cylinders and cones; 
the sphere and the spherical triangle. The solution of numerous origi- 
nal exercises, including loci problems. Applications to the measure- 
ment of surfaces and solids. 

48 



METHODS OF ADMISSION 

5. Plane Trigonometry. — The subject-matter of plane trigonometry 
as presented in good text-books, including the solution and use of trigo- 
nometric equations of a simple character, the use of logarithms, the 
solution of right and oblique triangles, and practical applications. 

6. Review Mathematics.— A general mathematics review during half 
of senior year is recommended, especially for students preparing for 
college engineering courses. A certificate covering the work of not 
more than one unit will be accepted for entrance. No examinations 
will be given. 

GROUP C. SOCIAL SCIENCE AND HISTORY 

This group includes history, political economy, and commercial law. 

Although there are excellent text-books in history, an adequate prepa- 
ration cannot be obtained by these alone. Some collateral work is 
necessary, whatever book is used, and with certain ones a large amount 
is necessary. The details of the preparatory work in history are fully 
stated in "A History Syllabus for Secondary Schools," by the New 
England History Teachers' Association, published by D. C. Heath & 
Co., Boston, 1904. Details are also stated in "Standard Program for 
the Secondary Schools of New Hampshire, State Department of Educa- 
tion, Concord, N. H." 

1. Ancient History. — This may include the earliest nations and the 
period to 800 A.D., or it may be limited to Grecian History and Roman 
History to the fall of the Western Roman Empire. 

2. Mediaeval and Modern History. 

3. English History. 

4. American History and Civics. — The work may conform to the 
course in American constitutional history described in the "Standard 
Program" or to the course in American history developed in nearly a 
hundred pages of the "Syllabus." It is assumed that in any case a 
reasonable amount of time is to be given io the study of the Constitution 
of the United States. 

5. Political Economy.— (1) The study of a standard text. (2) At 
least six topics investigated by outside reading. 

6. Commerical Law. — (1) Study of a standard text. (2) The study 
of a total of not less than thirty-six specific cases. 

49 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

GROUP D. NATURAL SCIENCE 

A notebook, carefully kept and examined by the teacher, is an essential 
part of all laboratory work in science. 

1. Botany. — The work in botany should consist of (1) the study of a 
standard text; (2) four or five exercises a week, at least one of which 
should be laboratory work. Either a half or the whole of a year's work 
will be accepted. 

2. Chemistry. — Elementary inorganic chemistry should cover (1) the 
more common nonmetallic and metallic elements with their most im- 
portant compounds, together with an introduction to the general 
theoretical principles; (2) calculations based upon changes of gaseous 
volumes and chemical equations. A year's work should consist of four 
or five exercises per week, at least one of which should be laboratory 
work. 

3. Physics. — The standard work in physics should consist of (1) the 
study of a standard text; (2) not less than forty experiments worked 
out in the laboratory by each student and properly recorded in a suit- 
able notebook. 

4. Zofilogy. — A study of the fundamental principles of animal struc- 
ture and the dissection of type forms. The student should become 
familiar with the characteristics of the various phyla of the animal 
kingdom. The study should consist of four or five exercises a week, at 
least one of which should be laboratory work. Either a half or the whole 
of a year's work will be accepted. 

5. General Science. — To meet a recent movement in the disposition 
of the science work in the high schools, a course in general science which 
amounts to at least four exercises a week for one year will be accepted. 
Such a course may include something of the biologic and earth sciences, 
the sciences employed in household economy, and the more common 
phenomena of physics and chemistry. 

GROUP E. FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

1. French. — Work of the first year should include (1) careful drill in 
pronunciation, (2) drill upon the rudiments of grammar, (3) abundant 
translation of simple English prose into idiomatic French, (4) reading of 
from 100 to 175 pages of French prose, (5) writing French from dictation. 
Work of the second year should include (1) the reading of from 250 to 

50 



METHODS OF ADMISSION 

400 pages of easy modern prose, (2) constant practice in translating from 
English into French variation of the text read, (3) frequent paraphrases 
of the text read, (4) dictation. 

2. German.— Work of the first year should include (1) careful drill 
in pronunciation, (2) drill upon the rudiments of grammar, such as the 
inflection of the articles, the common nouns, adjectives, pronouns and 
strong and weak verbs; upon the uses of the prepositions, the modal 
auxiliaries, and the rules of syntax and word order, (3) writing from 
dictation, (4) the reading of from 75 to 100 pages of prose, (5) translation 
from English into German. Work of the second year should include 
(1) the reading of from 150 to 200 pages of prose, (2) constant practice in 
translating from English into German variations of the text read, (3) 
dictation, (4) continued drill upon the rudiments of grammar, (5) fre- 
quent paraphrases of the text read. 

3. Latin, Elementary. — Grammar and the equivalent of four books of 
Caesar. Two years' work. 

4. Latin, Advanced.— Equivalent of Virgil, six books, and Cicero, six 
orations. 

GROUP F. VOCATIONAL SUBJECTS 

1. Agriculture (Smith-Hughes). — The work in agriculture covers ten 
periods a week throughout the school year and includes a study of and 
participation in the following, supplemented by at least six months of 
supervised, individual project work on the home farm: 

a. Major, contributory and minor agricultural enterprises in the com- 

munity based upon the results of a survey of local farm practice. 

b. At least twenty per cent of the total time allotted each year is 

devoted to farm mechanics, comprising the daily jobs confront- 
ing the farmer in keeping his equipment in the best of condition 
and in doing the ordinary repair and construction work which 
arises on the farm. 

c. Agricultural economics and farm management are considered each 

year in relation to each of the three types of enterprises. In ad- 
dition, part of the work of the senior year is devoted to a syn- 
thesis and extension of the principles applied in connection with 
the three types of enterprise in each of the three preceding years. 

Centering around the farm job and the home project, the activities of 
the pupils include discussions, surveys, directed study, demonstrations, 
field trips and manual work. 

51 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

2. Commercial Subjects. — Junior business training, commercial 
arithmetic, bookkeeping, commercial geography and history, stenog- 
raphy and typewriting, office or secretarial practice. 

3. Domestic Arts. — Textiles and clothing, foods and nutrition, the 
home, its care and management, the family and its members. 

4. Mechanic Arts. — Cabinet making and wood turning, pattern 
making and molding, tool forging and work on lathe, shaper, planer, 
drill press and milling machine, electrical work, automobile mechanics 
and repair, printing, related mechanical drawing, shop mathematics, 
shop physics, mechanics, shop organization. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

A mature student who is not a candidate for a degree may be admitted 
as a special student for one year upon the approval of the entrance 
committee and the dean of the college in which he desires to work. In 
addition, each application for a subject must have the approval of the 
head of the department whose work the applicant desires to take. No 
credit earned by a special student shall count toward a degree except 
upon recommendation of the entrance committee and the vote of the 
appropriate college faculty. 

ADMISSION BY TRANSFER 

A candidate for admission to advanced standing from an institution 
of collegiate rank may receive credit without examination for work com- 
pleted at such institution subject to the following requirements: 

(1) He must present a catalog of the institution from which he comes 
together with an official certificate showing (a) all preparatory subjects 
accepted for entrance, (b) a complete transcript of his record including 
grade of scholarship in each subject, (c) a statement of honorable dis- 
missal. 

(2) Every candidate for a bachelor's degree, admitted to advanced 
standing, must remain in residence at the University during his senior 
year, and must take in regular course at least 150 time units of work. 

(3) Regardless of the amount of advanced standing a student may 
secure, in no case will he be given a bachelor's degree until he has satis- 
fied the full requirements of the curriculum he may elect. 



52 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



AIMS 



The Graduate School aims to meet the needs of superior students who 
are preparing to become teachers in colleges or universities, or investiga- 
tors, and to offer opportunities to qualified students for a more advanced 
training than they can obtain in an undergraduate course. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Graduate work is offered, under the supervision of the Dean of the 
Graduate School, by competent members of various departments of 
instruction and research. These members constitute the Faculty of the 
Graduate School. 

The general administrative functions of the Faculty are delegated to 
the Dean and the Council. 

ADMISSION 

A student who holds a bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, from an 
approved college or university, is eligible for admission to graduate study. 

Admission to graduate study does not necessarily imply admission to 
candidacy for an advanced degree. Students who are not planning to 
become candidates for an advanced degree may be admitted to graduate 
study upon the recommendation of the heads of the departments con- 
cerned, and with the approval of the Dean. 

A student may major only in the departments represented in the cata- 
log of the Graduate School. However, a graduate student who is not 
a candidate for an advanced degree may be admitted to graduate study 
in departments not represented in the Graduate School catalog, upon 
recommendation of the departments concerned and with the approval 
of the Graduate Council, 

REGISTRATION 

A student desiring to register for graduate study must submit to the 
Dean of the Graduate School the official application for admission to 
graduate study. Blanks for this purpose may be obtained from the 
Dean of the Graduate School. 

Upon admission to graduate work, a student first pays his fee at the 
Business Office and deposits his enrollment cards with the Registrar. 

53 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 

Graduate credit will not be allowed to undergraduate students unless 
such credit has been approved in advance by the Dean of the Grad- 
uate School. No graduate credit will be given to undergraduates who 
lack more than 25 time units towards the bachelor's degree. 

A student will not receive graduate credit for a subject in which he has 
obtained a grade lower than 70. 

ADVANCED DEGREES 

Two types of advanced degrees are conferred: (a) Master of Science, 
and Master of Arts, given only in course, and (b) the professional 
degrees, Mechanical Engineer, and Electrical Engineer, conferred only 
upon graduates of this institution, and based upon the quality of their 
professional work and the presentation of a satisfactory thesis. In- 
formation in regard to the professional degrees may be obtained from the 
Dean of the College of Technology. 

Requirements for the Master's Degree 

Residence. — A minimum of one full academic year, or four summer 
sessions, in residence, is required. 

Credits. — An average grade of at least 80 in not less than 150 time 
units is required, of which not less than 80 or more than 100 time units 
shall be devoted to the major subject (including the thesis), and not less 
than 30 or more than 50 time units to the minor subjects. Work in 
allied departments may be properly correlated with the major subject. 
Not over 50 time units may be given for a thesis. Of the total time 
units required for an advanced degree, not more than half will be ac- 
cepted on admission from another institution. 

Candidacy. — At least six months previous to the time the degree is 
sought an application for admittance to candidacy must be submitted 
to the Council for their approval ; and if a thesis is required, the candidate 
must file with the Council, for their approval, a statement of the thesis 
subject as recommended by the head of the department in which the 
thesis work has been done. 

Thesis. — All theses must be typewritten upon standard paper, eight 
and one-half by eleven inches, medium weight, neatly bound in black 
cloth, and gilt-lettered on the first cover with the title, name of author, 

54 



I 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

degree sought, and year of graduation. The title page should bear the 
following statement: 

"A thesis submitted to the University of New Hampshire in partial 
fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts (Master 
of Science)." 

Whenever a thesis is printed in any periodical, it must be designated 
as having been accepted as a Master's thesis by the University of New 
Hampshire. 

Two bound copies must be filed before Commencement Day, one with 
the librarian and one with the head of the department in which the 
major work has been done. 

Examinations. — All candidates must meet the regular departmental 
requirements as to examinations in the subjects for which they are 
registered, and the requirement of a special comprehensive examination, 
by the heads of the departments in which the major and minor subjects 
have been taken, three months previous to the time the degree is sought. 
In addition, the candidate must pass an oral examination by a special 
committee designated by the Council and including the heads of the 
departments in which the major and minor subjects have been taken, 
before the candidate may be recommended for the Master's degree. 

For detailed information concerning graduate study see catalog of the 
Graduate School. 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREES IN ENGINEERING 

Mechanical, Electrical, and Civil Engineering graduates of the Uni- 
versity of New Hampshire are eligible to register as candidates for 
professional degrees in these three branches of engineering. 

These degrees will be granted, after the preparation of acceptable 
theses, to those having not less than four years' professional experience 
subsequent to the bachelor's degree, in which the applicants have 
wholly or in part supervised, directed or designed engineering work; or 
have been in responsible charge of instruction or research in engineering. 
The acceptability of the theses and professional experience is deter- 
mined by an examining committee. 

Procedure. — The procedure for candidates for professional engineer- 
ing degrees is as follows: 

(1) Prepare an outline for a thesis after consultation with the head 
of the department concerned. This consultation may be by letter. 

55 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

(2) When the thesis subject is accepted by the head of the depart- 
ment in which the degree is to be taken, the candidate will be registered 
in the Registrar's Office. This registration must be completed by 
October 1st of the school year in which the degree is to be conferred. 

(3) The first draft of the thesis must be submitted to the professor 
in charge not later than March 1st, and the completed thesis in its final 
form by May 1st. 

(4) Pass an examination at the University covering the candidate's 
professional practice and the engineering principles underlying the 
thesis. 

(5) Pay the diploma fee of $5.00 at the Business Office not later than 
12 noon of the Saturday next preceding the date when the degree is 
conferred. 

Thesis. — The thesis must be typewritten upon standard paper, eight 
and one-half by eleven inches, medium weight, neatly bound in black 
cloth, and gilt-lettered on the first cover with title, name of author, 
degree sought, and year of graduation. The title page should bear the 
following statement: 

"A thesis submitted to the University of New Hampshire in partial 
fulfillment of the requirements for the professional degree of Mechanical 
Engineer (Electrical Engineer or Civil Engineer)." 

Whenever a thesis is printed in any periodical, it must be designated 
as having been accepted as a Professional Engineering thesis by the 
University of New Hampshire. 

Two bound copies must be filed before Commencement Day, one with 
the librarian and one with the head of the department in which the 
major work is done. 

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 

The University confers two undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of 
Science and Bachelor of Arts. 

Agriculture and Technology: The degree of Bachelor of Science is con- 
ferred upon students graduating from the College of Agriculture and 
from the College of Technology. 

Liberal Arts: The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon 
students graduating from the College of Liberal Arts who have elected a 
prescribed course in Business Fundamentals, Home Economics, Pre- 
medical. Professional Education, Professional Physical Education for 
Women, or who have majored in the General Arts Course in any of 

56 



UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 

the following departments: Architecture, Botany, Chemistry, Economics 
and Accounting, Education, Entomology, Geology, Physics, Sociology, 
Zoology. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon students graduating 
from the College of Liberal Arts who have elected a prescribed course in 
Pre-Law or who have majored in the General Arts Course in any of the 
following: Art in the department of Architecture, English, French, 
German, Latin, Spanish, History, Music, Philosophy, Psychology, 
Political Science. 

College of Agriculture Requirements 

The completion of 600 units.* 

The completion of the subjects prescribed in the curriculum of some 
one of the major four-year courses. 

Students graduating from the four-year course in animal husbandry, 
dairy husbandry, teacher-training or general agriculture must present to 
the Dean of the College of Agriculture, at least two weeks prior to com- 
mencement, satisfactory evidence of having had practical experience in 
farm work, either through having lived on a farm for at least two years 
subsequent to the age of 12, or through having worked on a farm for at 
least six months subsequent to the age of 16. 

Students graduating from the Forestry Course must have spent at 
least three months in practical forest work, in addition to attendance at a 
six weeks' summer camp under supervision of the forestry department. 

Students graduating from the Horticultural Course or the Poultry 
Course must have spent five months, including the spring term of the 
junior year, in supervised practice work on a farm of recognized standing. 

College of Liberal Arts Requirements 

* Completion of 600 time units of which 50 may be required each term. 
Completion of subjects required in any one of the four-year courses 

offered by the Liberal Arts College. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

1. General Liberal Arts Course. 

The General Liberal Arts Course, in 1928-29, was divided into a 
Lower Division, including the freshman and sophomore years, and an 
Upper Division, including the junior and senior years. 

* A time unit is one hour of student work in class or in preparation. 

57 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Lower Division (Freshman and Sophomore Years) 

A. General. 

Completion of the following prescribed subjects: 

Convocation Freshman and sophomore years 

Freshman Assembly Freshman year — Fall term 

♦English 1.5a, 2.5b, 3.5c Freshman year 

♦English 4a, 5b, 6c Sophomore year 

Physical Education 51a, 52b, 53c Freshman year — Men 
Physical Education la, 2b, 3c, and 13a Freshman year — Women 

Physical Education 54a, 55b, 56c Sophomore year — Men 

Physical Education 4a, 5b, 6c Sophomore year — Women 

Military Science la, 2b, 3c Freshman year — Men 

Military Science 4a, 5b, 6c Sophomore year — Men 

B. Special. 

Completion of two full years, elected from each of the following three 
groups of subjects. Not less than one year's work in any given subject 
shall count toward the fulfillment of this requirement. 

Group 1. 

a. Mathematics, Statistics. 

h. History. 

c. English, French, German, Latin, Spanish. 

Group 2. 

Botany, Chemistry, Entomology, Geology, Physics, Zoology. 

Group 3. 

Economics, Education, Political Science, Psychology, Social 
Science, Philosophy, Sociology. 

C. Selection at the beginning of the freshman year of a tentative major 

department. This major may be changed with the approval of the 
Dean at the beginning of any term. 

Eligibility 

The Dean of the College of Liberal Arts shall determine the eligibility 
of a student to enter the Upper Division. 

Upper Division (Junior and Senior Years) 

A. Convocation (Junior year). 

B. Physical Education 7a, 8b, 9c (Junior Year — women). 

C. Election of a major course of study. 
♦ Not to be Uicd to meet special requirements. 

58 



UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 

At the beginning of the junior year every student shall choose a 
major department. The head of each major department, in conference 
with the student (eligible as stated above), shall designate a major 
course of study which will make up 150 time units in the major and re- 
lated departments exclusive of elementary subjects. They shall con- 
stitute a major course of study in which the student must secure a grade 
of 75 or better in each subject to the total of 100 time units. The major 
course of study selected, together with the related subjects totaling 150 
time units, shall become the student's required work, and a copy of the 
schedule of subjects, approved by the head of the major department, 
shall be filed in the office of the Dean. The student shall choose enough 
electives to make up 600 time units for the four-year course. 

A student may not change his major of study except with the approval 
of the Dean and the head of the department to which he is transferring. 

2. Prescribed Courses (College of Liberal Arts). 

a. The following prescribed courses lead to a degree of Bachelor of 
Science: Business Fundamentals, Professional Education, Home Eco- 
nomics, Teacher Training, Institutional Management, Extension Train- 
ing Course, Pre-Medical Course, Professional Physical Education for 
Women. 

They require the completion of 600 time units having an average of 50 
units each term and the completion of the special course requirements 
in accordance with the revised policy on eligibility at the end of the 
sophomore year, in the College of Liberal Arts. (See p. 58.) 

b. The prescribed course of Pre-Law leads to a degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. It requires the completion of 600 time units and the completion 
of special course requirements, in accordance with the revised policy on 
certification at the end of the sophomore year, in the College of Liberal 
Arts. (See page 58.) 

In making available prescribed courses such as the Home Economics 
Courses, the Business Fundamentals Course, the Pre-Medical Course, the 
Professional Education Course, the Pre-Law Course and the Professional 
Course in Physical Education for Worrien, in addition to the General 
Liberal Arts Course, it is understood that at least 50 per cent of the 
content of these courses shall be liberalizing in nature, and non-technical 
in character. In evaluating a given student's schedule, the heads of 
departments or staff officers concerned will be given a working formula 
to determine the meaning of technical courses in the sense in which they 
are here used. 

59 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

3. Honors Courses (Senior year). 

Work in Honors Courses is of a more mature and advanced nature 
than work offered in the general and prescribed courses. It is of a sort 
intended to encourage individual initiative and to conserve the resource- 
fulness of the student. All Honors courses are year courses. A term 
course, so listed, cannot be taken without special approval of the 
committee in charge. 

Honors work is of two kinds: 

1. Honors based on special work undertaken in addition to the regular 
program of general and prescribed courses. 

2. Honors based on work superseding that of the regular major course 
requirements of the upper division. 

At the beginning of his senior year, a student who has met his course 
requirements and who has shown promise in the work of his freshman, 
sophomore, and junior years may pursue Honors Work if nominated by 
his major adviser and if approved by the appropriate Related Subject 
Matter Committee. The student working in Honors may have the 
following privileges: 

a. He may carry a regular schedule, if doing quality work. 

b. He may substitute Honors \\'ork for his prescribed or major course 

requirements of the upper division. 

c. His attendance is regulated by agreement with his instructor. 

In addition to weekly reports and conferences, such tests as may seem 
best in his case are given to each student at the end of each term. At 
the end of the year the student is given comprehensive written examina- 
tions and an oral examination. 

If, for any reason, a student fails to show proper appreciation of the 
privilege of pursuing the Honors Course, he will be given examinations 
at the end of any term, and work successfully passed will be evaluated, 
by the committee in charge, toward graduation. 

College of Technology Requirements 

The completion of 600 time units. 

The completion of the subjects required in any one of the four-year 
engineering courses. 



60 



COURSES 



The University is closely related to the public school system of the 
state. It continues the work of the high school and is open to both men 
and women. In accord with the origin and function of the University, 
its courses are essentially practical, leading directly to the student's 
preparation for a successful livelihood. 

I. College of Agriculture. 

a. Four- Year Courses. 

1. General Agriculture. 

2. Agricultural and Biological Chemistry. 

3. Animal Husbandry. 

4. Dairy Husbandry. 

5. Forestry. 

6. Horticulture. 

7. Poultry Husbandry. 

8. Teacher Training. 

b. Two- Year Course in Agriculture. 

c. Farmers' and Home Makers' Week. 

n. College of Liberal Arts. 

a. Four-Year Courses. 

1. General Liberal Arts. 

2. Education. 

i. Professional Education. 

3. Home Economics. 

i. Teacher Training, 
ii. Institutional Management. 
iii. Extension Training. 

4. Business Fundamentals. 
► 5. Pre-Medical. 

6. Pre- Law. 

7. Physical Education for Women. 

i. Professional Physical Education. 

b. Extension. 

61 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

m. College of Technology. 

a. Four- Year Courses. 

1. Architecture. 

2. Chemical Engineering. 

3. Civil Engineering. 

4. Electrical Engineering. 

5. Mechanical Engineering. 

b. Options. 

1. Industrial Engineering. Three year option in 

Mechanical Engineering. 

2. Industrial Teacher Training. Senior year option for 

Mechanical and Electrical Engineering students. 



62 



FOUR. YEAR COURSES 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
Frederick W. Taylor, Dean 

DEPARTMENTS 

Agricultural and Biological Chemistry Dairy Husbandry 

Agricultural Economics Entomology 

Agronomy Forestry 

Animal Husbandry Horticulture 

Botany Poultry Husbandry 

This college of the University offers a four-year course for the general 
education and scientific training of students in the various phases of 
agriculture. The lecture and recitation work of the classroom is sup- 
plemented largely by practical exercises in the laboratories. Seminar 
subjects are also given, especially for seniors and advanced students. 

During the freshman and sophomore years all agricultural students, 
with the exception of those in the forestry course, take the same work. 
At the beginning of the junior year the students select whatever major 
course they desire to complete. Forestry students begin their specialized 
work in the freshman year. The work of the first two years for all of the 
agricultural students consists mainly of subjects in the fundamental 
sciences of agriculture and of basic subjects in the various departments 
of applied agriculture. 

Many of the graduates of the four-year course return to the farm for 
the purpose of putting into practice the knowledge and training of their 
college work, and many of them have become successful and prosperous 
citizens of their communities; others, who have no farms of their own, 
accept salaried positions as superintendents or foremen on the dairy, 
fruit, stock or poultry farms of large owners; still others take positions 
as teachers of science and agriculture in our secondary schools, or as 
assistants in our agricultural colleges, experiment stations or extension 
service work. 

The major courses from which the agricultural student may now make 
his selection are as follows: 

L General Agriculture. 5. Forestry. 

2. Agricultural and Biological Chemistry. 6. Horticulture. 

3. Animal Husbandry. 7. Poultry Husbandry, 

4. Dairy Husbandry. 8. Teacher Training. 

63 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

General Agriculture. — This course is offered especially for the student 
who wishes to secure a broad, general training in all the important 
branches of agriculture without specializing in any particular one. 
The fundamental sciences of chemistry, botany, biology, physics and 
economics are studied together with their application to the arts of 
field crop production, orcharding, dairying, farm management, poultry 
raising and the handling of the farm woodlot. The student, therefore, 
who expects to engage in general farming will find this so-called general 
course with its wide range of elective subjects a most profitable and 
interesting one. 

This course also offers an opportunity to the student who wishes to 
specialize in some line of Extension Service work like that of a county 
agent, a boys' club leader, a marketing or farm management investigator, 
or a soils and crops specialist. 

Agricultural and Biological Chemistry. — Students majoring in this 
course receive training in the various branches of general chemistry 
and in their application to the growth and development of plants and 
animals. The methods used in the chemical analysis of plants and 
agricultural products and in the study of animal nutrition and metab- 
olism are given especial attention. Aside from the technical and general 
requirements, numerous electives are offered which enable the student 
to obtain a more general training, to elect work in the applied depart- 
ments of the college, or to obtain the professional work needed for 
teaching in the schools of the state. The course is designed to provide a 
thorough foundation for those expecting to prepare themselves for 
teaching and research in colleges and experiment stations. The depart- 
ment is fortunate in being associated with the experiment station and 
in that connection having charge of the chemical analysis of feeds and 
fertilizers for the State Department of Agriculture. This furnishes an 
opportunity for the students to come in contact with the inspection and 
research work of the department and to have the the benefit of its equip- 
ment. 

Animal Husbandry. — This course is offered to the student who wishes 
a specialized training in the practical and intelligent management, selec- 
tion, breeding and feeding of livestock, including horses, beef and dual 
purpose cattle, sheep and swine. This work is arranged so that the 
student may elect a reasonable number of subjects in horticulture, 
forestry, dairying, poultry keeping and other branches of general farm 
activity, thus fitting him for the management of a general livestock 

64 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

farm. The course also serves to prepare students for the more special- 
ized requirements of civil service and other public employment. 

Dairy Husbandry. — The dairy husbandry department offers sub- 
jects in dairy production (that is, the care, feeding and management of 
dairy cattle), and in dairy manufactures (that is, the manufacture, the 
handling, and the distributing of dairy products). The department 
has at its disposal the dairy building, with modern equipment, and the 
college dairy herd of 85 pure bred animals. Excellent facilities are thus 
provided for teaching a dairy husbandry course. 

Forestry. — The training and instructional work in forestry is intended 
to meet the needs of three classes of students: (1) those who wish to fit 
themselves for positions as forest rangers and lumbermen in less than 
four years; (2) those who desire to secure four years' training in the 
science and practice of forestry, and (3) those who desire a foundation 
for graduate and professional work in forestry. 

The college forest of over 400 acres is near the campus so that it is 
possible to use the unusual variety of forest types on the University hold- 
ings in class work. This means that the student gets actual first-hand 
experience in handling a tract which has stands in it which range from 
5 years old to 250 years. The sixty acres of old growth pine and hemlock 
make up the finest area of its kind in New England. 

Students will spend six weeks in a forestry camp during the summer 
after their second year to get practical experience in camp life and in the 
survey, valuation and management of large tracts of woodland. This 
camp training is required of all students. 

Horticulture. — The object of this course of study is to equip the stu- 
dents with a knowledge of fundamental sciences such as can be obtained 
only through university training, and to help them form the habit of 
using this knowledge in solving practical problems in fruit and vegetable 
production. In order to emphasize the relation between science and 
practice and to give the uninitiated a more intimate contact with the 
problems which they will need to solve, a five months' period of practice 
work is required of students in the junior year. The study of insects 
and diseases (the control of which forms an important part of the work 
of the horticulturist) is required, as is also work in plant physiology which 
forms a basis for understanding the growth and development of plants. 
During the junior and senior years opportunity is given for the student 
to elect subjects in other branches of agriculture which may be helpful in 

65 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

meeting his own particular problem. Students who successfully com- 
plete this work may feel prepared to undertake either practical farming 
or further training along technical lines which will fit them for profes- 
sional work in teaching or research. 

Instruction in landscape design and related subjects is designed to 
enable the students to appreciate ornamental plants and their use in 
beautifying home and civic grounds. Instruction in floriculture is on a 
similar basis. 

Sufficient work is offered in apiculture to enable students to engage in 
beekeeping for pleasure, honey production, and for the purpose of 
pollinating fruit trees and other plants. 

The horticultural department is well equipped with gardens, orchards, 
grading and packing plant, bee equipment, greenhouses and laboratories, 
for the study of the different phases of this industry, especially fruit 
growing, which is so prominent in the agriculture of the state. 

Poultry. — This course of study is designed for those students who 
desire the necessary information and training to operate a poultry plant, 
or to teach poultry husbandry.' The college plant, with a capacity 
of 1600 hens, affords ample opportunities for laboratory work and 
for meeting all the practical problems of the industry which the poultry- 
man may encounter. As a part of the prescribed work, the student will 
be required to spend five months, including the spring term of the junior 
year, at a commercial plant of recognized standing. 

Teacher Training. — Under the provisions of the Smith-Hughes Act, 
the University of New Hampshire has been designated as the institu- 
tion in this state for the training of teachers of agriculture. This course 
gives the young man a broad training in the fundamental sciences and 
in general agriculture. In addition, he receives professional training 
in such educational subjects as psychology, principles of education, 
methods of teaching and supervised practice teaching. Students who 
complete the course and who have had the requisite amount of practi- 
cal experience on the farm will be accredited as teachers. 

There is a rapidly increasing demand for teachers of agriculture in 
our secondary schools. Local school boards are beginning to appreciate 
more fully the value of instruction in agriculture for the boys of the 
community who will not have the opportunity to continue their studies 
at the University. As a result, there are many good paying positions 
open for the young men who wish to make the teaching of agriculture 
a profession. 

66 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Freshman Year 

(All courses except Forestry) 

Fall 

Term 

Units 

Eng. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (English Composition) 7^ 

Bot. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (Elementary Botany) 8 

Chem. 10-a, 11-b, 12-c (Inorganic Chemistry) 8K 

A. H. 1-a (Breeds of Livestock) 9 

Agric. 1-b (Survey of Agriculture) 

For. 1-c (Principles of Forestry) 

Math. 2 1-a, 22-b (Elements Mathematical Analysis) 8 

Zool. 30-b, 31-c (General Zoology) 

Mil. Sci. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (Military Science) 5 

Phys. Ed. 51-a, 52-b, 53-c (Physical Education) 2 

Convocation 1 

Freshman Assembly (Required Fall Term) 



Winter 


Spring 


Term 


Term 


Units 


Units 


7K 


7K 


8 


8^^ 


8K 


8K 


2 






9 


8 




8 


8 


5 


5 


2 


2 


1 


1 



49 



50 



49 



Sophomore Year 

(All courses except Forestry) 

Agron. 1-a (Agricultural Engineering) 9 

Agron. 4-c (Soils) 

Agr'l Chem. 1-a, 2-b (Agricultural Chemistry) 12 

Ento. 1-a (Economic Entomology) 10 

Poul. 1-c (Farm Poultry) 

Phys. 1-a, 2-b (Introductory Physics) 8 

Bot. 10-b, 11-c (Bacteriology) 

D. H. 1-b (Milk and Its Products) 

Geol. 20-b (Elementary Geology) 

Hort. 1-c (Vegetable Gardening) 

Hort. 3-c (Elementary Pomology) 

fA. H. 2-c (Livestock Judging) 

tD. H. 2-c (Dairy Cattle Judging) 

fM. E. 7-c (Agricultural Drawing) 

tHort. 19-c (Beekeeping) 

tM. E. 13-c (Woodshop) 

Mil. Sci. 4-a, 5-b, 6-c (Military Science) 5 

Phys. Ed. 54-a, 55-b, 56-c (Physical Education) 2 

Convocation 1 



12 



8 

8 

10 

8 



5 

2 
1 



10 

7 
8 



5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
2 
1 



47 



54 



48 



t One of the five subjects noted must be taken; Teacher-Training students must take 
Woodshop. 

Junior and Senior Years 

Note 1. — At the beginning of the junior year students will choose their major course. 
Their registration card must then be approved by the head of the department in which 
the major is taken. 

Note 2. — During the junior or senior years 15 time units of so-called cultural sub- 
jects must be taken by all students, except those in the Teacher-Training course. 



67 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

Junior Year 

Fall 

Term 

Units 

Agron. 2-a {Forage Crops) 7 

Econ. 101-a, 102-b (Elementary Economics) 'yi 

Zool. 32-a (Genetics) 8 

Agr'l Ec. 3-b (Rural Economics) 

Agr'l Ec. 4-b (Farm Accounting) 

Agron. 3-b (Cereal Crops) 

Eng. 60-c (Public Speaking) 

Econ. 50-c (Principles of Business) 

Convocation l 

Elective ^-^ 

51 



Winter 


Spring 


Term 


Term 


Units 


Units 


7M 




9 




8 




7 






7H 




9 


1 


1 


18K 


33K 



51 



51 



Senior Year 

Agr'l Ec. 2-a (Farm Management) 11 

A. H. 3-a (Feeds and Feeding) 10 

Eng. 73-a (Expository Writing) 7>i 

Agron. 6-b (Fertilizers) 

Elective 2y/2 

50 

AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

Junior Year 

Fall 

Term 

Units 

Chem. 25-a, 26-b, 27-c 7^ 

Chem. 40-a, 41-b, 42-c (Organic) 7^ 

Agr'l Chem. 4-a. 5-b. 21-c (Physiological) 10 

Econ. 101-a, 102-b (Elementary Economics) 7K 

tAgr'l Ec. 3-b (Rural Economics) 

Phys. 3-c (Introductory Physics) 

Eng. 73-a (Expository Writing) '/2 

Eng. 60-c (Public Speaking) 

Convocation J!- 

Elective ^ 

51 

Senior Year 

Chem. 66-a. 67-b, 68-c (Physical) 7K 

Chem. 43-a, 44-b, 45-c (Organic Laboratory) 5 

Agr'l Chem. 7-a, 8-b, 9-c (Agricultural Analysts) 10 

JAgr'I Chem. 6-b (Plant Chemistry) 

German or French 7/4 

Elective ^ 

50 



8 




42 


50 


50 


50 


Winter 


Spring 


Term 


Term 


Units 


Units 


7H 


7K 


7K 


7K 


10 


10 


7K 




9 






8 




7K 


1 


1 


8K 


9K 


51 


51 


7K 


7K 


5 


5 


10 


10 


10 




7K 


7K 


10 


20 



SO 



50 



t This subject will be scheduled in the senior year in alternate years beginning with 
1931—32. 

t This subject will be scheduled in the junior year in alternate years beginning with 

1930-31. 



68 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Junior Year 

Fall 

Term 

Units 

A. H. 4-a (Animal Anatomy) 7^ 

Agron. 2-a (Forage Crops) 7 

Econ. 101-a, 102-b (Elementary Economics) 7K 

Econ. 50-c (Principles of Business) 

Zool. 32-a (Genetics) 8 

Agr'l Ec. 3-b (Rural Economics) 

Agr'l Ec. 4-b (Farm Accounting) 

Agr'l Chem. 4-a, 5-b (Physiological Chemistry) 10 

A. H. 5-b, 6-c (Animal Diseases) 

A. H. 9-c (Sheep and Swine) 

Eng. 60-c (Public Speaking) 

Convocation 1 

Elective 9 

50 

*D. H. 9-a (Dairy Bacteriology) 7K 

*P. H. 5-a (Poultry Management) 9 

*Acct. 131-a, 132-b, 133-c (Elementary Accounting) 7K 

*Agron. 3-b (Cereal Crops) 

*P. H. 7-b (Incubation) 

*P. H. 9-c (Poultry Feeding) 

*Zo6l. 40-b, 41-c (Embryology) 

Senior Year 

A. H. 3-a (Feeds and Feeding) 10 

A. H. 7-a (Animal Breeding) 10 

Agr'l Ec. 2-a (Farm Management) 11 

Eng. 73-a (Expository Writing) TjA 

A. H. 10-b (Horses and Beef Cattle) 

Agron. 6-b (Fertilizers) 

Ento. 3-b (Insects of Domestic Animals) 

A. H. 8-c (Markets and Products) 

A. H . 12-c (Seminar) ' 

Elective IIK 

50 

*Agr'l Ec 1-a (Cooperative Marketing) 8 

*For. 23-a (Far7n Woodlot) 7 

*D. H. 3-a, 3.5-b (Milk Production) 10 

*Met. 1-a 7^ 

*Hort. 6-b (Advanced Pomology) 

*Elec. Eng. 101-b (Electricity on the Farm) 

*Econ. 18-c (Marketing) 

* Recommended electives. 



Winter Spring 
Term Term 
Units Units 



9 




8 




10 




T'A 


7K 




8K 




7K 


1 


1 


9 


17K 



52 



7 
10 

12 



^2 

8 



26 
50 



7K 

8 
10 



51 



7K 



10 

12 



7K 
37 
50 



69 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Junior Year 

Fall 

Term 

Units 

D. H. 9-a {Dairy Bacteriology) 10 

Econ. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c {Elementary Economics) 9 

Econ. 50-c {Principles of Business) 

Zool. 32-a {Genetics) 8 

D. H. 4-b {Testing Dairy Products) 

Agr'l Chem. 4-a. 5-b {Physiological Chemistry) 10 

Agr'l Ec. 3-b {Rural Economics) 

D. H. 7-a {Butter Making) 7 

Eng. 60-c {Public Speaking) 

Agr'l Chem. 19-c {Dairy Chemistry) 

D. H. 11-c {Judging Dairy Products) 

Convocation 1 

Elective 6 

51 

*Agron. 2-a {Forage Crops) 7 

*A. H. 4-a {Animal Anatomy) 7K 

*P. H. 5-a {Poultry Management) 9 

*Agron. 3-b {Cereal Crops) 

*A. H. 5-b, 6-c {Animal Diseases) 

*Agr'l Ec. 4-b {Farm Accounting) 

Senior Year 

Acct. 131-a, 132-b, 133-c {Elementary Accounting) 7K 

D. H. 3-a. 3. 5-b {Milk Production) 10 

Agr'l Ec. 2-a (Farm Management) 11 

Eng. 73-a {Expository Writing) 7K 

D. H. 5-a {Market Milk) 10 

Agron. 6-b (Fertilizers) 

E. E. 101-b (Electricity on the Farm) 

D. H. 6-c (Ice Cream and Cheese) 

D. H. 10-c (Dairy Seminar) 

D. H. 13-c (Advanced Dairy Science) 

Educ. 30-c {Applied Psychology) 

Elective 4 

50 

*Agr'l Ec. 1-a {Cooperative Marketing) 8 

*A. H. 3-a {Feeds and Feeding) 10 

*A. H. 7-a {Animal Breeding) 10 

*For. 23-a {Farm Woodlot) 7 

*Met. 1-a 7K 

*Ento. 3-b {Insects of Domestic Animals) 

*Hort. 6-b (Commercial Pomology) 

*A. H. 9-c (Sheep and Swine) 

*Econ. 18-c (Marketing) 

*D. H. 12-c {Advanced Dairy Cattle Judging) 

* Recommended electives. 



Winter Spring 
Term Term 
Units Units 



7K 
10 
9 



52 



7H 
8 



9 
9 



7K 
8 

2K 
1 
13 

50 



7 




7K 


7M 


8 




7K 


7K 


7K 




8 




10 






10 




5 




8 




9 


17 


lOK 


50 


50 



8K 

9 

5 



70 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



FORESTRY 

Freshman Year 

Fall 
Term 
Units 

Bot. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c {Elementary Botany) 8 

Chem. 10-a, 11-b, 12-c {Inorganic Chemistry) 8>^ 

Eng. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c {English Composition) 7K 

Math. 2 1-a, 22-b {Algebra and Trigonometry) 8 

For. 3-a {Dendrology) 9 

For. 4-b {Wood Identification) 

Agric. 2-b {Survey of Agriculture) 

C. E. 6-c {Surveying) 

For. 25-c {Forest Improvements) 

Mil. Sci. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 5 

Phys. Ed. 5 1-a, 52-b, 53-c {Physical Education) 2 

Convocation 1 

Freshman Assembly (Required Fall Term) 

49 

Sophomore Year 

Agr'l Chem. 1-a, 2-b {Agricultural Chemistry) 12 

Zool. 1-a, 2-b. 3-c {Principles of Zoology) 10 

Phys. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c {Introductory Physics) 8 

For. 6-a, 24-b, 7-c {Silviculture) 10 

C. E. 7-a {Surveying) 7^ 

Geol. 20-b {Elementary Geology) 

Agron. 4-c {Soils) 

M. E. 7-c {Mechanical Drawing) 

Mil. Sci. 4-a, 5-b, 6-c 5 

Phys. Ed. 54-a, 55-b, 56-c {Physical Education) 2 

Convocation 1 

55K 

Junior Year 

Bot. 4— b, 5-c {Plant Physiology) 

Econ. 101-a, 102-b {Elementary Economics) 7>^ 

Met. 1-a {Elementary Meteorology) TH 

For. 5-a {Silvics) 10 

Ento. 1-a, 13-c {Economic Entomology and Forest Insects) .... 10 

For. 26-a, 8-b, 9-c {Forest Mensuration) 9 

For. 16-b, 17-c (Logging and Forest Products) 

For. 13-b, 14-c (Thesis) 

Convocation 1 

Electives 

45 
For. 22-s {Summer Camp) 23 units 

Senior Year 

Bot. 12-a, 13-b {Plant Pathology) 8 

Agr'l Ec. 3-b {Rural Economics) .-- 

Bot. 19-c {Systematic Botany) 

For. 15-a {Thesis) 8 

For. 10-a, 11-b, 12-c {Forest Management) 8 

For. 18-b, 19-c {History of Forestry) 

For. 20-a, 21-b {National Forest Administration) 7 

Eng. 73-a, 60-c {Expository Writing) {Public Speaking) 7K 

Electives 4K 

43 



Winter 


Spring 


Term 


Term 


Units 


Units 


8 


8 


8K 


8K 


7M 


7K 


8 




9 




2 






7y2 




9 


5 


5 


2 


2 


1 


1 



51 



55 



48 



48K 



12 




10 


10 


8 


8 


9 


10 


8 






10 




5 


5 


5 


2 


2 


1 


1 



51 



8 


8 


7K 






7H 


9 


9 


9 


9 


8 


8 


1 


1 


5K 


5K 



48 



8 




9 






6 


8 


8 


8 


8 


7 






7K 


5 


SH 


ts 


38 



71 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



HORTICULTURE 

Junior Year 

Fall 

Term 

Units 

Econ. 101-a, 102-b {Elementary Econo?nics) 7K 

Zool. 32-a (Genetics) 8 

tHort. 10-b {Evolution and Improvement of Plants) 

JEnto. 2-a {Orchard Insects) 7K • 

Bot. 12-a. 13-b {Plattt Pathology) 8 

Agr'l Ec 3-b {Rural Economics) 

Hort. 2 1-c {Practice) 

Convocation 1 

Elective ^^ 

51 

*Hort. 2-a {Greenhouse) 7 

*Hort. 20-a {Beekeeping) 5 

*Agron. 2-a (Forage Crops) 7 

*P. H. 5-b (Poultry Management) 

*Hort. 1 1-b (Vegetable Forcing) 

*Acct. 131-a. 132-b, 133-c (Elementary Accounting) 7>i 

*Econ. 50-c (Principles of Business) 

*Agr'l Ec. 4-b (Farm Accotmting) 

Senior Year 

Hort. 5-a (Fruit and Vegetable Survey) 5 

Agr'l Ec. 2-a (Farm Management) 11 

Eng. 73-a (Expository Writing) 7K 

Hort. 12-a, 12. 5-b (Seminar) 4 

JHort. 6-b (Advanced Pomology) 

Bot. 4-b, 5-c (Plant Physiology) 

Hort. 7-c (Landscape Gardening) 

Hort. 7. 5-c (Landscape Gardening: Laboratory Design) 

Eng. 60-c (Public Speaking) 

Elective ^^ 

50 

*Agr'l Ec. 1-a (Cooperative Marketing) 8 

*Hort. 17-a (Commercial Vegetable Gardening) 7 

*Hort. 18-a (Ornamental Shrubs) 5 

*Hort. 22-a (Fruit Judging) 7 

*D. H. 3-a, 3.5-b (Milk Production) 10 

*Met. 1-a 7M 

*Agron. 6-b (Fertilizers) 

*Elec. Eng. 101-b (Electricity on the Farm) 

*Hort. 23-b (Commercial Pomology) 7 

*Agron. 3-b (Cereal Crops) 

*Hort. 9-b, 9.5-c (Floriculture) 

*Hort. 4-c (Small Fruits) 

*A. H. 9-c (Sheep and Swine) 

*Econ. 18-c (Marketing) 

t Given in alternate years. 
* Recommended electives. 
J Not required if Horticulture 17-a is taken. 



Winter Spring 
Term Term 
Units Units 
7K 



8 
9 

1 

26K 

52 



9 

7 
7K 

8 



4 
8 
8 



30 
50 



7y: 

8 
10 

7 
5 



50 



50 



7M 
9 



8 
9 

2 

7K 
23K 

50 



5 

7 

8K 
9 



72 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Junior Year 

Fall 

Term 

Units 

Econ. 101-a, 102-b (Elementary Economics) 7j^ 

Zool. 32-a {Genetics) 8 

Agron. 3-b {Cereal Crops) 

P. H. 17-b {Poultry Marketing) '. 

P. H. 6-b {Poultry Diseases) 

Agr'l Ec. 3-b {Rural Economics) 

P. H. 13-c {Practical Work) '. 

Convocation 1 

Elective [ 34^ 

51 

*Agron. 2-a {Forage Crops) 7 

*A. H. 4-a {Animal Anatomy) 7^ 

*Hort. 1 1-b ( Vegetable Forcing) 

*Zo6l. 40-b (Embryology) 

*Agr'l Ec. 4-b (Farm Accounting) 

Senior Year 

P. H. 5-b (Poultry Management) 

P. H. 10-a (Poultry Breeding) 7 

P. H. 23-a (Breeds and Judging) 6K 

P. H. 31-a, 32-b. 33-c (Seminar) 5 

Agr'l Ec. 2-a (Farm Management) 11 

E. E. 101-b (Electricity on the Farm) 

Eng. 73-a (Expository Writing) 7K 

P. H. 14-a, 15-b, 16-c (Poultry Research) 6-9 

P. H. 7-b (Incubation) 

Eng. 60-c (Public Speaking) 

Econ. 50-c (Principles of Business) 

P. H. 9-c (Poultry Feeding) 

P. H. 12-c (Brooding) 

P. H. 22-c (Poultry House Construction) 

Elective • 7 

50 

*Agr'l Ec. 1-a (Cooperative Marketing) 8 

*A. H. 3-a (Feeds and Feeding) 10 

*For. 23-a (Farm Woodlot) 8 

*Acct. 13 1-a, 132-b, 133-c (Elementary Accounting) 7K 

*Met. 1-a 7K 

♦Agr'l Chem. 4-a, 5-b (Physiological Chemistry) 10 

*Agron. 6-b (Fertilizers) 

*Hort. 6-b (Advanced Pomology) 

*Hort. 4-c (Small Fruits) 

*Econ. 18-c (Marketing) 

* Recommended electives. 



Winter Spring 

Term Term 

Units Units 
7K 

7 

7 

10 

9 



1 

lOK 

52 , 



7 

12 

8 



7K 

10 
8 
8 



50 



50 



5 


5 


10 




6-9 


6-9 


10 






7K 




9 




10 




4 




3 


10 


5y2 


50 


50 



7K 



73 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



TEACHER TRAINING 

Junior Year 

Fall 
Term 
Units 
Agron. 2-a {Forage Crops) 7 

D. H. 3-a {Milk Production) 10 

Econ. 101-a, 102-b {Elementary Econoynics) 7K 

Ed. 34-a {Applied Psychology) 10 

Ed. 39-b {Secondary Education) 

Agr'l Ec. 3-b {Rural Economics) 

P. H. 1 1-b {Poultry for Teachers) 

M. E. 35-a, 36-c {Farm Carpentry and Metal Work) 7 

Agr'l Ec. 4-b {Farm Accounting) 

Agron. 3-b {Cereal Crops) 

Econ. 18-c {Marketing) 

Ed. 40-c {Classroom Methods) 

Eng. 60-c {Public Speaking) 

P. H. 9-c {Poultry Feeding) 

P. H. 12-c {Poultry Brooding) 

Soc. 28-b {Rural Sociology) 

Convocation 1 

Elective 7K 

50 

*A. H. 4-a {Anatomy) 7K 

*Ento. 2-a {Insects of Garden and Orchard) 7yi 

*Acct. 131-a, 132-b, 133-c {Elementary Accounting) IJ/i 

*Ed. 38-a {Secondary Education) 10 

*A. H. 5-b, 6-c {Animal Diseases) 

*D. H. 3.5-b {Milk Production) 

*Hort. 4-c {Small Fruits) 

*Hort. 19-c {Beekeeping) 

Senior Year 

Agr'l Ec. 1-a {Cooperative Marketing) 8 

Agr'l Ec. 2-a {Farm Management) 11 

A. H. 3-a {Feeds and Feeding) 10 

Bot. 12-a {Plant Pathology) 8 

tFor. 23-a {Farm Woodlot) 7 

Ed. 42-a {History and Principles of Vocational Education) ... 10 

Agron. 6-b {Fertilizers) 

Agron. 13-b {Farm Shop) 

Bot. 18-b {Plant Pathology) 

Ed. 32-b {Psychology of Adolescence) 

Ed. 48-b {Agriculture in High School) 

E. E. 101-b {Electricity on the Farm) 

Ed. 41-c {Practice Teaching) 

Elective 

54 

*Met. 1-a {Meteorology) 7K 

*Hort. 6-b {Advanced Pomology) 

*Ed. 43-b {Mental Hygiene) 

* Recommended electives. 
t Given in alternate years. 



Winter Spring 
Term Term 
Units Units 



7K 

10 
9 
5 

7 
8 
7 

9 
10 

7K 
10 
4 
6 
1 1 



53K 48K 



7M 

7K 
7H 



8 
7 
3 

10 
9 

10 



47 



8 
10 



7K 

7 
5 



50 
50 



74 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Albert N. French, Dean 



DEPARTMENTS 

Economics and Accounting Philosophy and Psychology 

Education Physical Education for Women 

English Political Science 

History Sociology 

Home Economics Statistics 

Languages Zoology 

Music Geology 

In the College of Liberal Arts the following courses are offered: 

General Liberal Arts Course. — This course provides a general col- 
lege training which especially prepares for citizenship, secondary school 
teaching, business, or graduate study. By means of the group system 
of elective studies an opportunity is given the student to major toward 
an A.B. or B.S. degree. (See requirements for Undergraduate Degrees.) 

Education — Professional Education Course. — Students preparing to 
teach in secondary schools should plan to take the course in professional 
education; also to include as electives, courses in sociology and public 
speaking. The regulations of the New Hampshire State Board of 
Education provide that college graduates or other students with four 
years of post-secondary education will be given secondary licenses 
provided that their courses included 12 semester hours of college work in 
Education. Education as stated here includes subjects in education, 
psychology, special methods courses, and educational sociology. It is 
recommended to the students of the University of New Hampshire that 
they plan their courses so as to meet these requirements which are 
indicative of what other states are specifying for certification to teach. 

Students transferring from State Normal Schools who meet the 
Liberal Arts requirements will be given 267 time units credit for the two- 
year normal course and 378 time units"' for the three-year course. Grad- 
uates of the Professional Education Course will be entitled to a license to 
teach in New Hampshire secondary schools. After one year of success- 
ful teaching experience they will be entitled to a permanent certificate. 

Home Economics Course. — The courses in home economics are 
planned to meet the demands for scientific training in home making. 

75 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Special courses are outlined for students who wish to enter fields of 
professional activity along educational and institutional lines of work 
and other courses are offered as electives for students in the Liberal 
Arts courses who wish to study one or more phases of home making. 

The technical work in household science is based upon the principles 
of physical, biological and social sciences. The subjects in foods, nutri- 
tion and dietetics require physics, chemistry and physiology; those 
in sanitation necessitate a knowledge of chemistry and bacteriology; 
home administration and the care and education of children demand a 
knowledge of the principles of human nutrition and dietetics, and of the 
principles of economics, psychology and sociology. The study of color, 
and design are fundamental to the work in costume design and house 
decoration. i 

The home economics courses offered are as follows: 

(1) Teacher Training Course. To prepare students to teach home 
economics in junior and senior high schools. (See Teacher Training 
Course.) 

(2) Institutional Management Course. To train students for posi- 
tions as dietitians and managers, or assistant dietitians or assistant 
managers in public institutions such as college dormitories, hospitals, 
tea rooms, cafetarias, etc. (See Institutional Course.) 

(3) Extension Training Course. To train students to become Home 
Demonstration Agents and Boys' and Girls' Club Agents. 

(4) General Arts Major in Home Economics. (Students wishing to 
take the General Arts Major in Home Economics should make out 
their schedules with the head of the department.) (See page — .) 

(5) Special Elective Unit Courses (Students wishing to take elective 
courses should consult the department head before registering for them.) 

Business Fundamentals Course. — Students wishing to prepare for a 
business career should take the general business course. This course 
has been planned so as to offer the foundation for a broad cultural edu- 
cation during the first and second years of the course, and then to intro- 
duce the student to the more general business courses in the Junior and 
Senior years. 

Pre-medical Course. — This course is offered to meet the needs of 
students who are preparing for the medical profession. 

It is highly desirable that a student should spend four years at this 
institution in preparation for a medical training, although many medical 
colleges do not require a degree for entrance. The four years of pre- 

76 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

medical work will, however, give the student a good cultural foundation 
for his future pre-medical work. 

Students following the prescribed pre-medical course will be granted 
entrance into any Class A medical school. However, owing to the 
crowded condition of most medical schools, only those students standing 
in the upper third or half of their class during their pre-medical work 
may be admitted. Some medical institutions restrict the number of 
students from any pre-medical school in which case, preference is 
always given to those students having the most complete training, and 
standing highest in their pre-medical work. 

If a student plans to do less than four years of pre-medical work, he 
should have his course of study carefully checked by the head of the 
Zoology department. 

Pre-Law Course. — This course is planned to meet the needs of 
students who are looking towards law as a profession. (See Pre-Law 
Course.) 

Physical Education. — Professional Education for Women. This 
course is planned to give professional instruction to women students who 
intend to teach physical education. (See Physical Education Course.) 



77 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

GENERAL LIBERAL ARTS COURSE 

Freshman Year 

Fall Winter Spring 

Term Term Term 

("a") ("6") ("c") 

Convocation 1 1 1 

Freshman Assembly {Required Fall Term) 

Eng. 1.5-a, 2.5-b, 3.5-c {English Reading) 9 9 9 

*Mil. Sci. 1-a, 2-b. 3-c 5 5 5 

*Phys. Ed. 51-a, 52-b, 53-c 2 2 2 

Elect one subject from each of the three groups, I, II, III: 
Group I. Ja. Math. 101-a, 102-b, 103-c, 1-a, 2-b, 3-c. 

Stat. 1-a, 2-b 7K-12H 7K-12K 7K-12K 

b. Hist. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 9 9 9 

tc. Lang. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c {French, German, Latin, 

Spanish) 9-10 9-10 9-10 

Group II. Bot. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 8 8 8 

Chem. 7-a, 8-b, 9-c 10 10 10 

Geol. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 10 10 10 

Physics 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 8 8 8 

Zool. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 10 10 10 

Note. — Additional science electives need special 
approval. 

Group in. Soc. Sci. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 9 9 9 

Preferred Electives: 

Ed. 11-a. b. c 6 6 6 

50 50 50 

Sophomore Year 

Convocation 1 1 1 

§ Mil. Sci. 4-a, 5-b, 6-c 5 5 5 

§ Phys. Ed. 54-a, 55-b, 56-c 2 2 2 

Eng. 4-a, 5-b, 6--c {Advanced Composition) 9 9 9 

Elect one from each of the three groups, I, II, III: 

Group I. Ja. Math. 101-a, 102-b, 103-c, 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 

Stat. 1-a, 2-b 7K-12K 7M-12K 7K-12K 

b. Hist. 1-a. 2-b. 3-c 9 9 9 

tc. Lang. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c {French, German, Latin, 

Spanish) 9-10 9-10 9-10 



2 



d. Eng. 16-a, 17-b, 18-c 7^ 7K 7 

Group II. Bot. 1-a. 2-b. 3-c 8 8 8 

Chem. 7-a. 8-b. 9-c 10 10 10 

Geol. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 8 8 8 

Phys. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 8 8 8 

Zool. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 10 10 10 

Note. — Additional science electives need special 
approval. 

Group III. Econ. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 9 9 9 

Ed. 21-a. 22-b, 23-c 10 10 10 

Pol. Sci. 101-a. 102-b, 103-c 6 6 6 

Psy, 21-a. 22-b. 23-c 10 10 10 

Phil. 24-a. 25-b. 26-c 10 10 10 

Soc. Sci. 1-a. 2-b. 3-c 9 9 9 

Soc. 14-a. 15-b. 16-c 9 9 9 

Electives to meet term requirements. 

50 50 50 

* Physical Education 1-a. 2-b. 3-c and 13-a are required of all Freshmen women. 

t Open only to freshmen with one year each of Algebra and Plane Geometry. 

t Students presenting two years of a language for entrance should secure departmental 
approval to register for 4-a, 5-b. 6-c. 

I Physical Education 4-a, 5-b, 6-c (2 units each are required of women students in- 
stead of Military Science and Physical Education 54-a, 55-b, 56-c). 

78 



I. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Junior Year 

Fall 

Term 

("a") 

Convocation 1 

Phys. Ed. 7-a, 8-b, 9-c (women) 2 

Major requirements and electives to meet term requirements. 

Senior Year ^® 

Major requirements and electives 50 



Winter Spring 

Term Term 

("6") ("c") 

1 1 

2 2 



50 
50 



50 
50 



II. 
Ill, 



HOME ECONOMICS COURSES 

Vocational Courses: 

A. Teacher Training Course 

B. Institutional Management Course 

C. Extension Training Course 
General Arts Major in Home Economics 
Elective unit courses for all students. 



Freshman Year p ,, 

Term 
a ) 

Convocation 1 

Freshman Assembly (Required Fall Term) 

Eng. 1.5-a, 2.5-b, 3.5-c 9 

Soc. Sci. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 9 

Chem. 14-b, 15-c 

H. E. 20-a, 21-b, 22-c {Clothing Selection) 9 

H. E. 102-a 5 

Phys. Ed. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 2 

Phys. Ed. 13-a {Health Problems) 2 

Zool. 33-a, 34-b, 35-c {Human Anatomy and Physiology) .... 8 

Electives 5 

50 

Sophomore Year 

Convocation 1 

Eng. 4-a, 5-b, 6-c {Composition) 9 

Phys. 33-b, 34-c {Household Physics) 

Agr'l Chem. 23-a, 24-b 12 

H. E. 52-a, 53-b, 54-c {Food and Cookery) 9 

H. E. 84-c {Home Furnishing) 

Phys. Ed. 4-a, 5-b, 6-c 2 

Arch. 20-a, 21-b {Domestic Architecture) 4 

H. E. 60-c (Dietetics) 

H. E. 82-a (Home Management) 9 

Electives 4 

50 
Junior Year 

Convocation 1 

Phys. Ed. 7-a, 8-b, 9-c 2 

Econ. 1-a, 2-b 9 

Bot. 8-a, 8. 5-b (Bacteriology) 9 

Ed. 31-a, 32-b, 33-c (Psychology) 7 10 

*H. E. 71-c (Child Development) 

H. E. 70-a (Child) 4 

H. E. 72-c (The Family) 

*H. E. 88-c (Home Management House) 

*H. E. 26-a (Millinery) 3 

*H. E. 26.5-a (Pattern Study) 3 

Electives 9 



Winter 
Term 
("b") 

1 


Spring 
Term 
("c") 

1 


9 
9 

12 
9 


9 

9 

12 

9 


2 


2 


8 


8 



50 



50 



* Required of Teacher Training and Extension majors only. 

79 



50 



1 


1 


9 


9 


10 


10 


12 




9 


9 




6 


2 


2 


4 






9 


3 


4 


50 


50 


1 


1 


2 


2 


9 




9 




10 


10 




6 




6 




12 


19 


13 


50 


50 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



TEACHER TRAINING COURSE 
Senior Year 



Ed. 40-c (Classroom Methods) 

Ed. 42-a {History and Principles of Vocational Education) 

H. E. 57-a {Meal Preparation) 

H. E. 27-a {Construction Problems) 

H. E. 1-c {Textiles) 

H. E. 106-a, 108-c {Home Economics Education) 

H. E. 107-b {Home Economics Teaching) 

H. E. 83-a {Home Care of the Sick) 

Electives 



Fall 


Winter Spring 


Term 


Term 


Term 


{"an 


("6") 


i"cn 

10 


10 






6 






4 




4 


6 


50 


6 


6 






18 




30 


50 


50 


50 



INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT COURSE 

Senior Year 

Fall 

Term 

("a") 

Zool. 13-a, 14-b, 15-c {Hygiene and Sanitation) 7 

Ent. 4-c {Household Insects) 

Acct. 112-a. 113-b {Accounting) 10 

H. E. 91-a, 92-b {Institutional Management) 6 

H. E. 94-a-b-c {Institutional Practice) 9 or 

H. E. 83-a {Home Care of the Sick) 6 

H. E. 61-a {Nutrition) 6 

H. E. 57-a {Meal Preparation) 6 

Electives to meet term requirements 

50 



Winter 


Spring 


Term 


Term 


{"b") 


("c") 


7 


7 




7M 


10 




6 




9 or 


9 



50 



50 



EXTENSION TRAINING COURSE 

Senior Year 

Fall 
Term 
{"a") 

Zool. 13-a, 14-b {Hygiene and Sanitation) 7 

Agri. 2-b {Extension Organization and Methods) 

Agri. 3-c {Supervised Extension Work) 

Soc. 28-b {Rural Sociology) 

H. E. 27-a {Construction Problems) 4 

H. E. 106-a {Home Economics Education) 6 

H. E. 88-a {Home Management House) 12 

D. H. 8-a {Domestic Dairying) 7K 

H. E. 83-a {Home Care of the Sick) 6 

H. E. 57-a {Meal Preparation) 6 

Electives to meet term requirements 

50 



Winter Spring 
Term Term 
{"b") {•'€") 



7 
8 



50 



50 



50 



1. General Arts Major students and others wishing to elect work in Home Economics 
should arrange their schedules with the head of the department. 



80 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



BUSINESS FUNDAMENTALS COURSE 

Freshman Year 

Fall 

Term 

("a") 

Convocation 1 

Freshman Assembly (Required Fall Term) 

Mil. Sci. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (Military Science) 5 

Phys. Ed. 5 1-a, 52-b, 53-c (Physical Education) 2 

Eng. 1.5-a, 2.5-b, 3.5-c (English Reading) 9 

Math. 101-a, 102-b, 103-c (Mathematics) 7K 

Soc. Sci. 1-a, 2-b (Social Science) 9 

Econ. 50-c (Principles of Business) 

A Science (Botany, Chemistry, Physics, Zoology, Geology) 7-10 

*A Foreign Language or European History 9 

50-51 

Sophomore Year 

Convocation 1 

Mil. Sci. 4-a, 5-b, 6-c (Military Science) 5 

Phys. Ed. 54-a, 55-b, 56-c (Physical Education) 2 

Eng. 4.5-a, 5. 5-b, 6.5-c (Business English) 9 

Acct. 112-a, 113-b, 114-c (Accounting) 10 

Econ. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (Principles of Economics) 9 

Econ. 6-a (Economic and Commercial Geography) 9 

Econ. 7-b, 8-c (Economic and Commercial History) 

Stat. 1-a, 2-b (Statistics) 7 

Math. 104-c (Mathematics) 

52 

Junior Year 

Convocation 1 

Econ. 7 1-a, 72-b, 73-c (Commercial Law) 9 

Econ. 13-a, 14-b (Money and Banking) 9 

Econ. 18-c (Marketing) 

Econ. 22-a (Corporations) - . 9 

Econ. 23-b (Corporation Finance) 

Econ. 24-c (Public Regulation) ....'. 

Acct. 115-a, 116-b, 117-c 10 

Electives 

50 



Winter 


Spring 


Term 


Term 


("f) 


C'c-) 


1 


1 


5 


5 


2 


2 


9 


9 


7K 


7K 


9 






9 


7-10 


7-10 


9 


9 


50-51 


50-51 


1 


1 


5 


5 


2 


2 


9 


9 


10 


10 


9 


9 


9 


9 


7 






7K 


52 


52K 


1 


1 


9 


9 


9 






9 


9 






9 


10 


10 



SO 



50 



Senior Year 

Econ. 10-a (Labor Problems) 10 

Econ. 57-c {Salesmanship) 

Eng. 61-a (Argumentation and Debating) 9 

Eng. 60-c (Public Speaking) 

Electives 

50 
* Required of Teacher Training and Extension majors only. 



50 



9 
9 

50 



81 



Winter 


Spring 


Term 


Term 


("6") 


C'c") 


1 


1 


10 


10"- 


9 


9*^ 


10 
9 


'?) 


5 


5 


2 


2 


TA 


7K 


9 


9 


10 


10 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

PRE-MEDICAL COURSE 

Freshman Year 

Fall 

Term 

("a") 

Convocation 1 

Freshman Assembly (Required Fall Term) 

Chem. 7-a, 8-b, 9-c (Inorganic Chemistry) 10 

Eng. 1.5-a. 2.5-b, 3.5-c (English Reading) 9 

Fr. 4-a, 5-b, 6-c (French Prose) or 10 

Ger. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (Elementary German) 9 

Mil. Sci. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (Military Science) 5 

Phys. Ed. 5 1-a, 52-b, 53-c (Physical Education) 2 

*Math. 101-a, 102-b, 103-c (Mathematics) or 7M 

♦Soc. Sci. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (Social Science) 9 

Zool. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (Principles of Zoology) 10 

50 50 50 

Sophomore Year 

Convocation 1 i i 

Chem. 25-a, 26-b, 27-c (Introductory Qualitative and Quantita- 
tive A nalysis) 7}4 

Eng. 4-a, 5-b, 6-c (English Composition) 9 

*Fr. 7-a. 8-b, 9-c (French) or 10 

*Ger. 4.5-a, 5. 5-b, 6.5-c (Scientific German) 8K 

Mil. Sci. 4-a, 5-b, 6-c (Military Science) 5 

Phys. Ed. 54-a, 55-b, 56-c (Physical Education) 2 

Zool. 45-a, 46-b, 47-c (Comparative Anatomy) 12 

50 
Junior Year 

Convocation 1 

Chem. 46-a, 47-b, 48-c (Organic Chemistry) 9 

Chem. 49-a, 50-b, 51-c (Organic Laboratory) 6 

Phys. 17-a, 18-b, 19-c (Pre-medical Physics) 14 

Zool. 48-a. 49-b, 50-c (Cytology and Genetics) 12 

*Eng. 61-a (Argumentation and Debating) 9 

*Eng. 16-a, 17-b, 18-c (English Literature) 9 

*Eng. 60-c (Public Speaking) 

*Fr. 13-a, 14-b. 15-c (Advanced French) 10 

*Geol. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (Elementary Geology) 10 

♦Ger. 7-a, 8-b, 9-c (Advanced German) 10 

*Hist. 29-a, 30-b, 31-c (History of United States) 8 

*Psy. 2 1-a, 22-b, 23-c (Introduction to Psychology) 10 

*Soc. 14-a, 15-b, 16-c (Principles of Sociology) 9 

*Zool. 36-a. 37-b, 38-c (Histology) 12 

*Zo6l. 51-a, 52-b, 53-c (Neurology) 12 

50 
Senior Year 

Zool. 39-a, 40-b, 41-c (Embryology) 12 

*Chem. 66-a. 67-b, 68-c (Physical Chemistry) 7K 

Agr'l Chem. 4-a. 5-b, 21-c (Physiological Chemistry) 10 

*Econ. 1-a. 2-b. 3-c (Principles of Economics) 9 

*Hist. 22-a. 23-b, 24-c (English History) 9 

*Phil. 24-a, 25-b, 26-c (Philosophy) 10 

*Pol. Sci. 104-a, 105-b, 106-c (American and Municipal 

Government) 9 

*Psy. 47-a, 48-b, 49-c (Physiological Psychology) 10 

*Soc. 24-a. 25-b. 26-c (Advanced Sociology) 9 

*Zool. 16-a. 17-b. 18-c (Evolution and Genetics) 7 

Zool. 42-a, 43-b, 44-c (Advanced Physiology) 12 

50 50 50 

* Recommended electives, 

82 



7K 


7K 


9 


9 


10 


10 


8K 


8H 


5 


5 


2 


2 


12 


12 


50 


50 


1 


1 


9 


9 


6 


6 


14 


14 


12 


12 


9 


9 




9 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


8 


8 


10 


10 


9 


9 


12 


12 


12 


12 


50 


50 


12 


12 


7K 


7K 


10 


10 


9 


9 


9 


9 


10 


10 


9 


9 


10 


10 


9 


9 


7 


7 


12 


12 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

Freshman Year 

Fall 
Term 

("a") 

Convocation 1 

Freshman Assembly (Required Fall Term) 

Educ. 1 1-a 6 

Eng. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 7K 

Hist. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 9 

Mil. Sci. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 5 

Phys. Ed. 51-a, 52-b, 53-c 2 

Soc. Sci. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 9 

Elect one: Botany, Chemistry, Physics, Zoology 8-10 
Elect one: Math. 19-b, 120-c, Eng. 2.5-b, 3.5-c, 
H. E. 25-b, 26-a. 15-c, 54-c, Lib. Sci. 1-b, 

Geol. 1.5-b. Zool. 27-c 

47K-49M 

Sophomore Year 

Convocation 1 

Educ. 21-a, 22-b. 23-c 10 

Eng. 61-a, 60-b, 63-c 9 

Mil. Sci. 4-a, S-b, 6-c 5 

Phys. Ed. 54-a, 55-b, 56-c 2 

Psy. 21-a, 22-b, 23-c 10 

Group I elective 9 

Group II elective 8-10 

54-56 

Junior Year 

Convocation 1 

Educ. 31-a, 32-b, 33-c 10 

Educ. 38-a, 39-b, 40-c 10 

Elect Special Methods in three related subjects. . 9 

Elect two courses in subjects to be taught 18 

48 
Senior Year 

Educ. 41-a or b or c 50 

Educ. 44-b or c 

Elect two courses in subjects to be taught 18 

Free electives to complete 600 time units 



Winter 


Spring 


Term 


Term 


Cb") 


re") 


1 


1 


T'A 


7H 


9 


9 


5 


5 


2 


2 


9 


9 


8-10 


8-10 


3-9 


3-9 


44K-52K 


44K-52^ 


1 


1 


10 


10 


7K 


9 


5 


5 


2 


2 


10 


10 


9 


9 


8-10 


8-10 


52M-54K 


54-56 


1 


1 


10 


10 


10 


10 


9 


9 


18 


18 


48 


48 


50 


SO 


10 


10 


18 


18 



PRE-LAW COURSE 

Freshman Year 

Fall 
Term 
a ) 

Convocation 1 

Freshman Assembly (Required Fall Term) 

Eng. 1.5-a, 2.5-b, 3.5-c (English Reading) 9 

Mil. Sci. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (Military Science) -. 5 

Phys. Ed. 51-a, 52-b, 53-c (Physical Education) 2 

tLang.-Fr. or Ger. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 9 

iScience: Zool. 1-a. 2-b. 3-c, Chem 7-a, 8-b, 9-c. Bot. 1-a, 

2-b, 3-c, Math. 101-a, 102-b. 103-c 7-10 

Soc. Sci. 1-a. 2-b, 3-c 9 

Hist. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c _9 

51 



Winter Spring 

Term Term 

rb") ("c") 

1 1 



9 
5 
2 
9 

7-10 
9 
9 

51 



t Students presenting two years of a language should enroll for 4-a. 5-b, 6-c. 
t Any courses which meet the science requirement in Liberal Arts. 

83 



9 

5 
2 
9 

7-10 
9 
9 

51 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Sophomore Year 

Fall 
Term 

(41 _ lt\ 
a ) 

Convocation 1 

Eng. 4-a. 5-b, 6-c 9 

Phys. Ed. 54-a, S5-b, 56-c 2 

Mil. Sci. 4-a, 5-b, 6-c 5 

Pol. Sci. 101-a, 102-b. 103-c 6 

Pol. Sci. 104-a. 105-b, 106-c 9 

Lang. — Fr. or Ger. 4-a, 5-b, 6-c 10 

^Science: Zool. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c. Chem. 7-a, 8-b, 9-c. Phys. 

1-a, 2-b, 3-c, Bot. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c, Geol. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c, and 

Math. 101-a, 102-b, 103-c 7-10 

Electives: 

Psy. 21-a, 22-b, 23-c 10 

Econ. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 9 

Soc. 14-a, 15-b, 16-c 9 

See. 21-b 

50 

Junior Year 

Convocation 1 

Pol. Sci. 113-a, 114-b, 115-c 9 

Hist. 29-a, 30-b, 31-c 9 

Electives: 

Eng. 61-a, 60-b, or 60-c 9 

Phil. 31-a, 32-b, 33-c 10 

Others 12 

50 

Senior Year 

Pol. Sci. 1 18-c 

Pol. Sci. 112-a, 123-b, 124-c 4 

Electives 46 

50 



Winter Spring 

Term Term 

("6") ("c") 

1 1 
9 9 

2 2 

5 5 

6 6 
9 9 

10 10 



7-10 

10 
9 
9 
9 

50 



7-10 

10 
9 
9 



50 



1 

9 
9 


1 
9 
9 


7K 
10 

13K 


7K 
10 

13K 


50 


50 


4 
46 


8 

4 
38 



50 



50 



PROFESSIONAL COURSE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

Freshman Year 



Convocation 

Freshman Assembly (Required Fall Term) 

Eng. 1.5-a, 2. 5-b, 3.5-c 

fLang. — Fr., Ger., Sp., 1-a, 2-b, 3-c or Hist., 

1-a, 2-b. 3-c 

Soc. Sci. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c 

Sci. Sur. {Astron. 122-a), {Geol. 1.5-b), (Zool. 

27-c) 

Chem. 14'b, 15-c 

Phys. Ed. 1.5-a, 2.5-b, 3.5-c 

Phys. Ed. 13-a 

Preferred Elective: Education 11-b, or c 

Elective 



Fall 
Term 
("a") 

1 


Winter 

Term 

{"b") 

1 


Spring 
Term 

re") 
1 


9 


9 


9 


9-10 
9 


9-10 
9 


9-10 
9 


3 

4 
2 

7 


3 
12 

4 

6 


3 
12 

4 

6 


51K-52>^ 


48K-49K 


48>^-49K 



t Any courses which meet the science requirement in Liberal Arts. 

t Students presenting two years of a language should enroll for 4-a, 5-b, 6-c. 



84 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



Sophomore Year 



*Convocation 

Eng. 4-a, 5-b, 6-c 

Zool. 33-a, 34-b, 3S-c 

Psy. 21-a, 22-b, 49-c 

Ed. 21-a, 22-b, 47-c 

Agr'l Chem. 23-a. 24-b 

H. E. 63-c 

Phys. Ed. 14-a, 15-b, 16-c. . 
Phys. Ed. 4.5-a, 5. 5-b, 6.S-C 



Junior Year 

Convocation 

Zool. 13-a, 14-b, 15-c 

Eng . 60-c 

Music 104-a, lOS-b, 106-c 

Ed. 39-b 

Ed. 33-c 

Ed .31-a 

Phys. Ed. 17-b, 19-c 

Phys. Ed. 18-a, 18-b 

Phys. Ed. 20-a, 21-b, 22-c 

Phys. Ed. 23-a. 24-b, 25-d 

Phys. Ed. 7.5-a, 8.5-b, 9.5-c 

Soc. 1 7-a 

Electives 



Senior Year 

H. E. 83-a 

Ed. 43-b 

Ed. 32-b 

Ed. 40-c 

Zool. 42-a, 43-b, 44-c 

Soc. 29-c 

Phys. Ed. 26-a. 27-b, 28-c 

Phys. Ed. 29-a, 30-b, 31-c 

Phys. Ed. 32-a, 33-b, 34-c 

Phys. Ed. 35-a, 36-b, 37-c 

Phys. Ed. 10.5-a, 11.5-b, 12.5-c 

Phys. Ed. 38-c 

Elective 



Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


Term 


Term 


Term 


("fl") 


V'b") 


("c") 


1 


1 


1 


9 


9 


9 


8 


8 


8 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


8 


6 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


56 


54 


52 


1 


1 


1 


7 


7 


7 
7K 


4 


4 
10 


4 
10 


10 








6 


4 


6 


6 




2 


2 


2 


6 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


9 






1 


7 


7 



50 



51 



50K 





10 






10 


10 


12 


12 


12 
6 


4 


4 


4 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 


6 


6 


6 


4 


4 


4 

4 


13 







* May be taken first term senior year. 



50 



51 



51 



85 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 

George W. Case, Dean 



DEPARTMENTS 

Architecture Mathematics 

Chemistry Mechanical Engineering 

Civil Engineering Physics 
Electrical Engineering 

The College of Technology offers the following four-year courses: 

Architectural Course. — This course is planned to prepare its graduates 
for immediate usefulness in the profession of architecture and, while it is 
highly technical, it does not overlook the need of the professional man 
for a broad cultural background. 

The work in design in the sophomore and junior years is based on the 
programs issued by the Beaux Arts Institute of Design in New York City. 
This plan insures the maintenance of high scholarship, since the student's 
work is competitive not only with that of the other students in the de- 
partment, but also with the work of students in other schools of architec- 
ture in the country. 

A booklet, descriptive of the w^ork of the department, will be sent to 
prospective students interested in architecture. Address your request to 
"Department of Architecture, University of New Hampshire, Durham, 
N. H." 

Chemical Engineering Course. — This course is intended to fit the 
student for the career of a professional chemist, and to give a good foun- 
dation for original and independent chemical research. 

Instruction is imparted by lectures, recitations and a large amount 
of carefully supervised laboratory work. The laboratory study is 
largely an individual one, and the work of each student is conducted with 
reference not only to the particular object he may have in view, but also 
to the acquirement of a broad knowledge of chemical science. The 
student is given a thorough training in either German or French to enable 
him to read with ease the chemical literature; a thorough grounding in 
mathematics, necessary for advanced theoretical chemistry or chemical 
engineering; a somewhat limited amount of special work in both mechan- 
ical and electrical engineering and a thorough undergraduate training in 
theoretical and applied chemistry. He is encouraged to develop the 

86 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 

power of solving chemical problems by independent thought through the 
aid of the reference library and chemical periodicals. 

Civil Engineering Course. — This course is designed to give the student 
the groundwork of the broad field of civil engineering. About equal em- 
phasis is placed upon highway, hydraulic, sanitary and structural en- 
gineering. The sophomore and junior years each contain four terms : fall, 
winter, spring and summer. The first three terms in both years are 
devoted to regular class work. The summer term of the sophomore 
year is for actual employment in surveying and that of the junior year 
on construction work. The student is under the general supervision of 
a member of the Faculty during these periods of employment. This 
work, including a report, is required for graduation. 

Electrical Engineering Course. — The electrical engineering course is 
intended to meet the demands of young men fitting themselves for pro- 
fessional engineering in connection with the various applications of 
electricity. 

By means of lectures, recitations and laboratory work, the subjects 
of the course are brought to the attention of the student in such a man- 
ner as not only to emphasize the present needs of the practitioner and 
engineer, but to give him the principles needed to understand the con- 
stantly increasing number of new problems that require solution. 

Mechanical Engineering Course. — The mechanical engineering course 
is intended to train young men for positions of responsibility in the 
field of the mechanical industries and designed to fit them socially for 
their proper place in the world. The studies in the course are scien- 
tific, including mathematics, physics and chemistry; technical, including 
drawing, shop work, thermodynamics, hydraulics, machine design, 
electrical engineering, power engineering; and cultural, including English, 
history and psychology. 

Instruction is given by means of recitations, lectures and laboratory 
work supplemented by illustrated lectures and assigned reading. 
Throughout the course the theoretical work is supplemented by actual 
practice in mechanical operation and scientific research, by training in 
the use of tools for working wood and metals, and by experimental 
tests and demonstrations in the mechanical, electrical, chemical and 
physical laboratories. 

Industrial Engineering. — This line of study, which is an option in 
Mechanical Engineering, is designed to train students for positions in the 

87 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

production and commercial departments of industry. The course is 
well balanced in basic sciences, engineering, economics, history, psychol- 
ogy and in addition to the work at the University the student is placed in 
actual employment in industry, under the general supervision of a mem- 
ber of the l-'aculty. This employment, which is scheduled in the curric- 
ulum as cooperative work and on which a report is required, is a require- 
ment for graduation. 

Industrial Teacher Training. — This line of work is an option in the 
senior year for Mechanical and Electrical Engineering students espe- 
cially adapted to teaching. The educational subjects given in this 
course are designed to prepare for Smith-Hughes teaching positions. 

Concerns Furnishing Cooperative Work For Technology Students. 

Acme Knitting Machine & Needle Co., PVanklin, N. H. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, Manchester, N. H. 

Boston and Maine Railroad, Hillerica, Mass. 

Brown Company, Berlin, N. II. 

Coleman Brothers, Boston, Mass. 

Ford Motor Company, Boston, Mass. 

Kidder Press Company, Dover, N. H. 

Nashua Manufacturing Company, Nashua, N. H. 

New England Power Association, Boston, Mass. 

New Hampshire Gas and Electric Company, Portsmouth, N. H. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R. Co., Readville, Mass., and 

Van Ness, N. Y. 
D. W. Overocker, Brattleboro, Vt. 
Parker Young Company, Lincoln, N. H. 
State Highway Department, Concord, N. H. 
B. F. Sturtevant Company, Hyde Park, Mass. 
Sullivan Machinery Company, Claremont, N. H. 
U. S. Geological Survey, Washington, D. C. 
Walworth Manufacturing Company, Boston, Pvlass. 
Western Electric Company, Kearney, N. J. 



88 




COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 

ARCHITECTURE 

Freshman Year 

Fall Winter Spring 

Term Term Term 

("a") ("6") ("c") 

Math. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (First Year Mathematics) 12^ 12^ 12^ 

Chem. 1-a {Inorganic Che?nistry) 10 

Eng. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (English Composition) 7K 7>^ 7^ 

M. E. 1-a (Engineering Drawing) 6 

M. E. 10-a, or 16-a (Wood Shop or Forge) ^ 7K 

Mil. Sci. 18-a. 19-b, 20-c (Military Science) '. / 5 • 5 5 

Phys. Ed. 51-a, 52-b, 53-c (Physical Education) 2 2 2 

Arch. 8-b, 9-c (Graphics) y. . . . 5 5 

Arch. 14-b, 12-c (Elements of Architecture) \. . . . 5 5 

Arch. 2-b, 3-c (Elements of Design) 5 5 

Art 8-b, 9-c (Design) 6K 6^ 

Convocation 1 1 1 

Freshman Assembly (Required Fall Term) 



Sophomore Year 



K 49K 49K 



Art 10-a, 11-b, 12-c (Freehand Drawing) 5 5 5 

Arch. 4-a, 5-b, 6-c (History of Architecture) 2K 2K 2^ 

Arch. 50-a, 51-b, 52-c (Architectural Design) 14 16 16 

Hist. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (History) 9 9 9 

Phys. 27-a, 28-b, 29-c (Physics) 9 9 9 

Geol. 100-a (Clay Products and Building Stones) 6 

Mil. Sci. 2 1-a, 22-b, 23-c (Military Science) 5 5 5 

Phys. Ed. 54-a, 55-b, 56-c (Physical Education) 2 2 2 

Convocation 1 1 1 

53X 49K 49K 



X. 



Junior Year 

Arch. 30-a, 31-b, 32-c (Materials of Construction) 7H 7H TH 

Arch. 53-a, 54-b, 55-c (Architectural Design) 16 16 16, 

Art 13-a, 14-b, 15-c (Color, Modeling, Life Drawing) 4 4 4 

E. E. 100-c (Elements of Electricity) ' 7K 

C. E. 5-a (Surveying) 7/4 

M. E. 79-b (Heating and Ventilating) 7K 

M. E. 49-a, 50-b, 51-c (Mechanics) 7K 7K 7K 

Convocation 1 1 1 

Elective 7H TH 7H 

51 51 51 

Senior Year 

Arch. 33-a, 34-b, 35-c (Building Construction) 7K 

Arch. 60-a, 61-b, 62-c (Architectural Thesis) 10 

Arch. 23-a (Domestic Architecture) 9 

Arch. 39-a (Building Sanitation) 2>2 

Arch. 41-b (Professional Relations) 

C. E. 86-c (Specifications) .-- 

Acct. 131-a, 132-b, 133-c (Accounting and Bookkeeping) .... 7K 

Econ. 104-a (Economic History of the Working Classes) 7^ 

Econ. 105-b (Business Administration and Finance) 

Econ. 106-c (Law of Contracts) 

M. E. 12-c (Wood Shop) 

tConvocation 1 

Elective 7K 

52K 52 49K 

t Optional. 

89 



7K 


7K 


16 


16 


5 






2H 


7M 


7K 


7K 






5 




2K 


1 


1 


7K 


7H 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

TECHNOLOGY COURSE IN CHEMISTRY 

Freshman Year 

Fall 
Term 

("a") 

Eng. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (English Composition) 7>2 

Math. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c [First Year Mathematics) 12K 

Chem. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (Inorganic Chemistry) 10 

Chem. 22-c (Qualitative Analysis) 

M. E. 1-a (Engineering Drawing) 6 

M. E. 30-b (Machine Work) 

M. E. 10-a or 16-a (Wood or Forge Work) 7K 

Geol. 20-b (General Geology) 

Mil. Sci. 18-a, 19-b, 20-c (Military Science) 5 

Phys. Ed. 5 1-a, 52-b. S3-c (Physical Education) 2 

Convocation 1 

Freshman Assembly (Required Fall Term) 



Sophomore Year 

Chem. 23-a (Qualitative Analysis) 5 

Chem. 40-a, 41-b, 42-c (Organic Chemistry) 7X 

Chem. 43-a, 44-b, 45-c (Organic Chemistry Laboratory) 5 

Chem. 28-b, 29-c (Quantitative Analysis) 

Math. 7-a, 8-b, 9-c (Calculus) 7H 

Phys. 6-a. 7-b, 8-c (Physics) 8K 

Phys. 9-a, 10-b, 11-c (Physics Laboratory) 11 

Mil. Sci. 2 1-a, 22-b, 23-c (Military Science) 5 

Phys. Ed. 54-a, 55-b, 56-c (Physical Education) 2 

Convocation 1 



Junior Year 

Chem. 30-a, 31-b, 32-c (Quantitative Analysis) 12 

Chem. 160-a, 161-b, 162-c (Physical Chemistry) 7K 

Chem. 163-a, 164-b, 165-c (Physical Chemistry Laboratory) . . 7 
Chem. 100-a, 101-b, 102-c (Advanced Inorganic Chemistry) 

or 7K 

Chem. lS2-a, 153-b, 154-c (Advanced Organic Chemistry) . . . 

M. E. 46-a, 47-b, 48-c (Mechanics) 7K 

Ger. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c (German) 9 

Convocation 1 

SIK 
Senior Year 

Chem. UO-a, 111-b, 112-c (Industrial Chemistry) 7M 

Chem. 80-a, 81-b, 82-c (Thesis) 17>^ 



'2 



Chem. 70-a, 71-b, 72-c (Seminar) 2 

E. E. 15-a, 16-b (Industrial Electricity) 7}4 

M. E. 66-b, 67-c (Thermodynamics) 

Ger. 4.5-a, 5.5-b, 6.5-c (German) 8K 



90 






Winter 


Spring 


Term 


Term 


("b") 


("c") 


TA 


7K 


12M 


12K 


10 


10 




11 


S 




8 




5 


5 


2 


2 


1 


1 



51K 51 49 



7H 


7K 


5 


5 


8K 


SH 


7H 


lYz 


8K 


8K 


10 


10 


5 


5 


2 


2 


1 


1 



52K 55 55 



12 


12 


7K 


7K 


7 


7 


7K 


7M 


7K 


7K 


9 


9 


1 


1 


51K 


SK 


7H 


7K 


17K 


17^ 


2K 


2K 


7K 




lA 


7K 


8K 


8K 



43K 51 43K 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



CIVIL, ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Freshman Year 

Fall Winter Spring 

Term Term Term 

("a") ("6") ("c") 

Math. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c {First Year Mathematics) 12K 12M 12K 

Chem. 1-a. 5-b, 6-c {Inorganic Chemistry) 10 10. 10 

Eng. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c {English Composition) 7K 7K 7K 

M. E. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c {Engineering Drawing) 6 6 6 

Shop 10-a or 16-a {Wood or Forge Work) 1}4 

Shop 10-b or 16-b {Wood or Forge Work) 7K 

C. E. 1-c {Surveying) 7^2 

Mil. Sci. 18-a, 19-b, 20-c {Military Science) 5 5 5 

Phys. Ed. 5 1-a, 52-b, 53-c {Physical Education) 2 2 2 

Convocation 1 1 1 

Freshman Assembly {Required Fall Term) 

51K 51K SIK 

Civil Engineering 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Winter Spring Summer 

Term Term Term Term 

("a") {"b") {"c") {"s") 

> Math. 7-a, 8-b, 9-c {Calculus) 7}4 TH 7K 

^Econ. 101-a, 102-b {Principles of Economics) .... 7K 7K 

Phys. 6-a, 7-b. 8-c {Physics) 8K 8K 8M 

Phys. 9-a. 10-b, U-c {Physics Laboratory) 11 10 10 

C. E. 2-a {Topographical Surveying) 7K 

C. E. 3-b {Topographical Drawing) 5 

C. E. 4-c {Railway Curves) 5 

C. E. 20-c {Highway Location) 7K 

C. E. 8-b {Engineering Astronomy) 5 

Mil. Sci. 2 1-a, 22-b, 23-c {Military Science) 5 5 5 

Phys. Ed. 5'i-a., 55-h, 56-c {Physical Education).. 2 2 2 

Convocation 1 1 1 

C. E. 93-s {Cooperative Work) Regular 

Working 
Hours 



50 



51J 



46K 



Junior Year 

E. E. 34-a, 35-b, 36-c {Electrical Machinery) .... 7K 

M. E. 43-a, 44-b, 45-c {Applied Mechanics) 7K 

M. E. 52-a, 53-c {Testing Materials Laboratories) . . 2K 

C. E. 2 1-a {Highway Location) 5 

C. E. 22-a (Materials) 5 

C. E. 60-a, 61-b, 62-c {Stresses) 10 

C. E. 41-b, 42-c {Hydraulics) 

C. E. 80-a. 81-b, 82-c {A. S. C. E.) IM 

Geology 20-b 

Mil. Sci. 24— a {Military Science) or "I 7^ 

Met. 1-a {Meteorology) J '"' ' 

Mil. Sci. 25-b {Military Science) or "1 

M. E. 104-b {Personnel Administration) j '-^ 

Mil. Sci. 26-c {Military Science) or \ 

Ed. 30-c J 

C. E. 94-s {Cooperative Work) 

Convocation 1 

47K 



7K 7K 

7y2 7K 



10 10 

7 7 

IJ^ IK 
8 



7K 

1 
SO 



k 



7K 

Regular 
1 Working 

Hours 



47 



91 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Senior Year 

Fall 

Term 

("o") 

C. E. 23-a, 24-b, 25-c (Economics of Highway Design) 5 

C. E. 26-a, 27-b, 28-c (Economics of Railway Engineering and 

Transportation) .5 

C. E. 49-a, 50-b, Sl-c (Hydraulic Engineering) 5 

M. E. 61-a, 62-b, 63-c (Heat Power Engineering) 5 

C. E. 63-a (Bridge Design) 10 

C. E. 64-b (Building Design) 

C. E. 65-c (Concrete Structures) 

C. E. 45-a (Water Supply) 5 

C. E. 47-b (Sewerage) 

C. E. 46-b (Water Purification) 

C. E. 48-c (Sewage Disposal) 

C. E. 83-a, 84-b. 85-c (A. S. C. E.) IK 

C. E. 90-a, 91-b. 92-c (Thesis) 5 

C. E. 87-a. 88-b, 89-c (Seminar) 1 

Mil. Sci. 27-a (Military Science) or ] 

Econ. 104-a (Economic History of Working \ 7K 

Classes) J 
Mil. Sci. 28-b (Military Science) or 1 
Econ. 105-b (Business Administration and ^ 

Finance) . J 

Mil. Sci. 29-c (Military Science) or 
Econ. 106-c (Commercial Law) and 
C. E. 86-c (Specifications) J 



50 



Fall 
Term 

(tt _ If \ 
a ) 



Electrical Engineering 
Sophomore Year 



Math. 7-a, 8-b. 9-c (Calculus) 7M 

Phys. 6-a, 7-b, 8-c (Physics) 8K 

Phys. 9-a, lO-la, U-c (Physics Laboratory) 11 

E. E. 31-a, 32-b, 33-c (Electrical Laboratory) 3 

Math. 121-c (Astronomy) 

M. E. 56-c (Kinematics) 

M. E. 4-a, S-b (Machine Drawing) 5 

M. E. 20-a, 21-b (Machine Shop) 7K 

Mil. Sci. 21-a, 22-b. 23-c (Military Science) 5 

Phys. Ed. 54-a, 55-b, 56-c (Physical Education) 2 

Convocation _1_ 

SOK 
Junior Year 

E. E. 37-a, 38-b, 39-c (Electrical Problems) 5 

E. E. 1-a, 2-b. 3-c (Dynamo Electric Machinery) 9 

E. E. 28-a, 29-b, 30-c (Electrical Laboratory) 5 

M. E. 43-a, 44-b. 45-c (Mechanics) 7K 

M. E. 64-a, 65-b (Thermodynamics) 7K 

M. E. 68-a, 69-b, 53-c (Mechanical Laboratory) 5 

Educ. 30-c (Applied Psychology) 

E. E. 41-a, 42-b. 43-c (Student Branch of A. I. E. E.) IK 

Econ. 104-a (Economic History of the Working Classes) 7K 

Econ. 105-b (Business Administration and Finance) 

Econ. 106-c (Law of Contracts) 

C. E. 86-c (Specifications) 

tMil. Sci. 24-a, 25-b, 26-c (Military Science) 

Convocation _!. 

49 



Winter Spring 

Term Term 

("b") ("c") 

5 5 



5 

5 
5 

10 



5 
5 
5 



10 



5 




5 






S 


IK 


IK 


5 


5 


1 


1 



7K 



55 



Winter 

Term 

("b") 

7K 

8K 

10 

4 



5 
2 
1 

50K 

5 
9 

5 

7K 

7K 

5 

IK 
7K 



_1_ 

49 



50 

J- 

Spring 

Term 

("c") 

7K 

8K 

10 

5 

3K 
7 



5 
2 
1 

49K 

5 
9 

5 

7K 

5 

7K 

IK 



5 

2K 

1 

49 



t Students enrolling in Mil. Sci. 24-a, 25-b, 26-c are not required to enroll in Econ- 
104-a, 105-b, 106-c, and C. E. 86-c. 

92 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Senior Year 

Fall 
Term 
a ) 

E. E. 7-a, 8-b, 9-c {Electrical Engineering Practice) 9 

*E. E. 11-a, 12-b, 13-c (Electrical Laboratory) 10 

E. E. 19-a (Illumination Engineering) 5 

*E. E. 4-a, 5-b, 6-c (Wire and Radio Communication) 7^ 

E. E. 10-b (Electric Railways) 

E. E. 21-c (Theory of Electrical Circuits) 

E. E. 22-a. 23-b, 24-c (Term Papers) 4 

E. E. 44-a, 45-b, 46-c (Student Branch ofA.I.E.E.) IK 

Phys. 15-a (Theory of Electrons) 7 

Phys. 37-c (Electrical Measurements) 

M. E. 74-a, 75-b, 75.5-c (Power Plant Engineering) 5 

C. E. 43-b, 44-c (Hydraulics) 

tMil. Sci. 2 7-a, 28-b, 29-c (Military Science) 

49 

Mechanical Engineering 

Sophomore Year 

Fall 
Term 
a ) 

Math. 7-a, 8-b, 9-c (Calculus) T : -■■:' . 7K 

Phys. 6-a, 7-b, 8-c (Physics) rrTT. 8K 

Phys. 9-a, 10-b, 11-c (Physics Laboratory) . . . .-rr-r: 11 

M. E. 56-c (Kinematics) V."." 

Math. 121-c (General Astronomy) 

• M. E. 4-a, 5-b (Machine Drawing) :.-.-.■ 5 

M. E. 40-a, 41-b, 42-c (Mechanical Laboratory) . .'.T' 4 

M. E. 20-a, 21-b (Machine Work) 7K 

Mil. Sci. 21-a, 22-b, 23-c (Military Science) r. 5 

Phys. Ed. 54-a, 55-b, 56-c (Physical Education) 2 

Convocation 1 



Winter 


spring 


Term 


Term 


("b") 


("c") 


9 


9 


10 


12 


7K 


12 


4 






10 


4 


4 


IK 


IK 




4 


5 


5 


7K 


5 



49K 



49 



Winter 


Spring 


Term 


Term 


("6") 


("c") 


7K 


7K 


8K 


8K 


10 


10 




7. 




3K 


5 




4 


4 


7K 




5 


5 


2 


2 


1 


1 



SlK 50K 48K 



Junior Year 

E. E. 25-a, 26-b, 27-c (Electrical Machinery) 11 

M. E. 43-a, 44-b, 45-c (Mechanics) .-. 7K 

M. E. 64-a, 65-b, 65.5-c (Thermodynamics) '. 7K 

M. E. 68-a, 69-b, 53-c (Mechanical Laboratory) 5 

M. E. 82-a, 83-b, 84-c (A. S. M. E.) IK 

Mil. Sci. 24-a (Military Science) or \ 

Econ. 104-a (Economic History of Working Classes) j ^ 

Mil. Sci. 25-b (Military Science) or t 

Econ. 105-b (Bzisiness Administration and Finance) J 
Mil. Sci. 26-c (Military Science) or ] 

Econ. 106-c (Law of Contracts) and [ 

C. E. 86-c (Specifications) J 

Convocation 1 

Elective 7K 



11 

7K- 

7K 

5 



11 
7K 
7K 
5 





S 




2K 


1 


1 


7K 


7K 



48K 48K 48K 

* Students may elect either E. E. 6-c or E. E. 13-c. 

t Students electing Military Science 2 7-a, 28-b, 29-c are not required to enroll in 
Physics 15-a, E. E. 10-b and E. E. 21-c. 



93 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Senior Year 

Fall 
Term 

. ("a") 

M. E. 74-a. 75-b. 75.5-c {Power Plants) 5 

M. E. 58-a, 59-b. 60-c {Machine Design) rTT. 7K 

M. E. 55-a. 72-b, 73-c {Mechanical Laboratory) . . rrT. 5 

M. E. 104-b ':.' 

M. E. 54-a {Manufacture of Iron and Steel) 5 

M. E. 109-a 7K 

M. E. 112-a {Materials Handling) 7H 

C. E. 43-b. 44-c {Hydraulics) f t 

M. E. 79-c {Heating and Ventilating) ". 

M. E. 85-a. 86-b, 87-c {A. S. M. E.) IK 

M. E. 89-a, 90-b, 91-c {Thesis) 6 

Mil. Sci. 27-a, 28-b, 29-c {Military Science) or "1 _ 71^ 

M. E. 76-a, 77-b, 78-c {Automotive Engineering) J 

52K 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Freshman Year 

Fall Winter 

Term Term 

("a") ("6") 

\ Eng. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c {English Composition) 7K 7K 

Chem. 1-a, 5-b, 6-c {Inorganic Chemistry) 10 10 

Math. 1-a. 2-b, 3-c {Unified Mathematics) 12K 12K 

M. E. 1-a, 2-b, 3-c {Engineering Drawing) 6 6 

Shop 10-a or 16-a {Wood or Forge Work) 7K 

Shop 10-b or 16-b {Wood or Forge Work) 7K 

C. E. 1-c {Surveying) 

Mil. Sci. 18-a, 19-b, 20-c {Military Science) 5 5 

Phys. Ed. 5 1-a, 52-b, 53-c {Physical Education) . . 2 2 

Convocation 1 1 

M. E. 100-s {Cooperative Work) 



51K 

Sophomore Year 

Math. 7-a, 8-b {Calculus) 7H 

Econ. 101-a, 102-b {Elementary Economics) 7K 

Phys. 6-a, 7-b {Physics) 8K 

Phys. 9-a, 10-b {Physics Laboratory) 11 

M. E. 20-a, 21-b {Machine Shop) 7K 

Mil. Sci. 2 1-a, 22-b {Military Science) 5 

Phys. Ed. 54-a, 55-b {Physical Education) 2 

Convocation 1 

M. E. 10 1-c, 102-s {Cooperative Work) 



51j 



7K 
7K 
8K 
10 

7K 
5 
2 
1 



Winter 


Spring 


Term 


Term 


{"b") 


("c") 


5 


5 


7K 


7K 


7K 


7K 


7K 




7K 


5 




7K 


IK 


IK 


6 


6 


7K 


7K 



50 



47K 



Spring 


Summer 


Term 


Term 


{"c") 


("5") 


7K 




10 




12K 




6 




7K 




5 




2 




1 






Regular 




Working 




Hours 



51J 



Regular Regular 
Working Working 
Hours Hours 



50 



49 



94 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Junior Year 

Fall Winter 

Term Term 

("a") C'b") 

E. E. 25-a, 26-b, 27-c {Electrical Machinery) .... 11 11 

M. E. 46-a. 47-b, 48-c {Mechanics) 7K 7^ 

M. E. 4-c {Machine Drawing) 

M. E. 64-a, 65-b {Thermodynamics) 7K 7K 

M. E. 109-a, UO-b, lU-c {Industrial Manage- 
ment) 7K 7K 

M. E. 82-a. 83-b. 84-c {A. S. M. E.) IK IM 

Mil. Sci. 21-a, 22-b, 23-c {Military Science) or \ ^w ^w 

Acct. 131-a, 132-b, 133-c {Elements of Accounts) f '^ ^' 

Convocation 1 1 

Elective 7K 7K 

M. E. 103-3 {Cooperative Work) 



Spring 
Term 
{"c") 
11 

7K 

5 



7K 
IK 



7K 

1 

7K 



Regular 

Working 

Hours 



51 51 48K 

Senior Year 

M. E. 74-a, 75-b, 75.5-c {Power Plants) 5 5 5 

M. E. 7(>-a, 71-b, 73-c {Mechanical Laboratory) 7K 7K 7K 

C. E. 43-b. 44-c {Hydraulics) 7K 5 

M. E. 105-a, 106-b, 107-c {Industrial Problems) 5 5 5 

M. E. 112-a {Materials Handling) 7K 

M. E. 104-b {Personnel Administration) 7}4 

M. E. 108-c {Industrial Problems) 7K 

M. E. 54-a {Manufacture of Iron and Steel) 5 

M. E. 85-a, 86-b. 87-c {A. S. M. E.) IK IK IK 

Stat. 1-a, 2-b, Math. 25-c {Mathematics of Finance and 

Statistics) 7 7 6 

Mil. Sci. 27-a {Military Science) or 1 

Econ. 104-a {Economic History of Working Classes) \ 7H 

Mil. Sci. 28-b {Military Science) or "I J 

Econ. 105-b {Business Administration and Finance j 7K 

Mil. Sci. 29-c {Military Science) or | 

Econ. 106-c {Law of Contracts) and [ 7K 

C. E. 86-c {Specifications) J 

M. E. 89-a, 90-b. 91-c {Thesis) 5 ^ J^ 

50 51K 50 

INDUSTRIAL TEACHER TRAINING COURSE 

Senior Option for Electrical and Mechanical Engineering students: 

Fall Winter Spring 
Term Term Term 
{"a") ("6") ("c") 
Ed. 42-a {History and Principles of Vocational Education) ... 10 

Ed. 39-b {Secondary Education) 10 

Ed. 40-c {Classroom Methods) 10 

Ed. 34-a {Applied Psychology in Vocational Education) 10 

Ed. 32-b {Psychology of Adolescence) -, 10 

Ed. 23-c {Classroom Management) y 

Ed. 41-c {Supervised Practice Teaching in Industrial Arts) . . . 12K 12K 12K 

M. E. 24-a. 25-b, 26-c {Machine Work) 5 5 5 

M. E. 76-a, 77-b, 78-c {Automotive Engineering) 7K 7K 'A 

M. E. 18-a (Forge 5Aoi>) 5 

M. E. 14-b, 15-c {Wood Shop) _ _5 _» 

SO 50 50 



95 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

The University of New Hampshire Summer School (the seventh ses- 
sion of which will be held from June 30 to August 8, 1930) offers courses 
in most departments of all three colleges. The Summer School is de- 
signed to meet the needs of: 

1. Teachers, superintendents and supervisors of secondary schools. 

2. Students in the University of New Hampshire and in other colleges 
who desire to utilize the vacation period for the purpose of anticipating 
courses or supplying deficiencies. 

3. Graduate students, who may earn the degree of Master of Arts or 
Master of Science for work done exclusively during summer sessions. 

4. Candidates for admission to any of the colleges of the University 
who desire to obtain advanced standing or to complete some special 
requirement for admission. 

For Summer School Bulletin, information as to particular courses, 
etc., address the Director of the Summer School, University of New 
Hampshire, Durham, N. H. 

EXTENSION COURSES FOR UNIVERSITY CREDIT 

In response to the insistent demand of the teachers of the state the 
Trustees of the University have approved the giving of extension 
courses for university credit. Professors are sent out to centers within 
the state where there is a demand for classes to be formed. At present 
the courses offered will depend on the teaching schedules of the various 
departments. 



96 



DESCRIPTION OF SUBJECTS 

(Alphabetically Arranged) 

The title of each subject is given in black face type. The numeral designates the 
particular subject; and the letter (a, b, or c) designates the term in which the subject is 
given. The letter "a" indicates that a subject is given the first term; "b" the second 
term; and "c" the third term. A combination of the letters (a-b, b-c, or a-b-c) 
attached to a numeral indicates that the subject is given through the terms repre- 
sented by the letters. 

Following the title X)f each subject is the description of the work given, and the name 
of the instructor. 

The next paragraph gives the following information in the order indicated: (1) pre- 
requisites, if any; (2) in what courses the subject is required and the undergraduate year 
in which it should be taken; (3) the number of hours of recitations, preparation, or 
laboratory periods required a week; (4) the number of units the subject will count 
towards graduation. Lectures and recitations are fifty minutes in length. Laboratory 
periods are two and one-half hours in length. 

All subjects unless otherwise noted are open to students who have passed the pre- 
requisites. 

An elective subject will be given only when there is a minimum of five students regis- 
tered for the same. 



ACCOUNTING 

(See Economics) 



AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

Thomas G. Phillips, Professor 

Stanley R, Shimer, Assistant Professor 

Thomas A. Pickett, Graduate Assistant 

Minor: 48 units in Agricultural Chemistry following at 
least 22 units in General Chemistry. 

1-a. Agricultural Chemistry. A study of the chemistry of the carbon 

compounds with special emphasis on those of most importance in 

agriculture. The laboratory includes some methods of quantitative 

analysis. Prof. Shimer and Mr. Pickett. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 12-c. Required of Sophomores 
in Agriculture. Lee, 3 hrs.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 12 
units. 

2-b. Agricultural Chemistry. A survey of the relations of chemistry 
to the growth and development of plants and animals. Prof. Phillips 
and Mr. Pickett. 

97 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite: Agricultural Chemistry 1-a or its equivalent. 
Required of Sophomores in Agriculture. Lee, 3 hrs. ; lab., 
5 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 12 units. 

4-a. Physiological Chemistry. An advanced study of the chemistry 
of the fats, carbohydrates and proteins, and some of the general applica- 
tions of chemistry to biology, such as colloids and enzyme action. 
Prof. Shimer. 

Prerequisite: Agricultural Chemistry 2-b or 24-b or equiv- 
alent preparation in organic chemistry and quantitative 
analysis. Required of students in Animal Husbandry, 
Dairy Husbandry, and Agricultural Chemistry, and of Pre- 
medical students. Elective for others. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 
5 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 10 units. 

5-b. Physiological Chemistry. The chemistry of animal physiology, 

including foods, digestion, metabolism and excretion. Prof. Shimer. 

Prerequisite: Agricultural Chemistry 4-a. Required of 
students in Animal Husbandry, Dairy Husbandry and 
Agricultural Chemistry, and of Pre-medical students. 
Elective for others. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 
10 units. 

6-b. Plant Chemistry. A study of the chemistry of plant growth 

and development, and methods for the analysis of plant materials. 

Prof. Phillips. 

Prerequisite: Agricultural Chemistry 4-a. Required of 
students in Agricultural Chemistry. Elective for others. 
Given only in alternate years beginning with 1930-31. 
Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 10 units. 

7-a, 8-b, 9-c. Agricultural Analysis. A study of the methods of 

analysis of fertilizers, feeding-stuffs and other products important in 

Agriculture. Prof. Phillips and Prof. Shimer. 

Prerequisites: At least 15 units in Quantitative Analysis 
and 20 units in Organic Chemistry. Required of students 
in Agricultural Chemistry. Elective for Chemistry stu- 
dents and for others having the prerequisites. Lab., 8 
hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 10 units. 

19-c. Dairy Chemistry. A study of the chemistry and methods of 

analysis of milk and other dairy products. Prof. Shimer. 

Prerequisite: Agricultural Chemistry 2-b or equivalent 
preparation in organic chemistry and quantitative analysis. 
Required of Dairy Husbandry students. Elective for 
others. Given only in alternate years beginning with 
1930-31. Lee, 1 hr.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 8 units. 

98 



AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

21-c. Physiological Chemistry. The qualitative and quantitative 
examination of blood and urine. Prof. Shimer. 

Prerequisite: Agricultural Chemistry 5-b. Required of 
students in Agricultural Chemistry and of Pre-medical stu- 
dents. Elective for others. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 5 hrs. 
prep., 3 hrs.; 10 units. 

23-a. Household Chemistry. An introductory course in organic 
chemistry and its application to household affairs. The laboratory in- 
cludes some methods of quantitative analysis. Prof. Shimer and Mr. 
Pickett. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 15-c. Required of Sophomores 
in Home Economics. Lee, 3 hrs.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 
4 hrs.; 12 units. 

24-b. Physiological and Food Chemistry, The chemistry of human 
physiology including enzyme action, digestion, absorption and metabol- 
ism, and of food materials. Prof. Shimer and Mr. Pickett. (Formerly 
23-b). 

Prerequisite: Agricultural Chemistry 23-a or its equiva- 
lent. Required of Sophomores in Home Economics. 
Lee, 3 hrs.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 12 units. 

For subjects primarily for graduate students, see Catalog of the 
Graduate School. 

AGRICULTURE 
Frederick W. Taylor, Professor 

1-b. Survey of Agriculture. A brief history of agriculture as a 
business and scientific profession in this country; a general discussion 
and survey of the various branches of agriculture and the opportunities 
for work which each affords. Lectures on the several agricultural 
courses by the various heads of departments. Prof. Taylor. 

Required of Freshmen in Agriculture. Lee, 1 hr. ; prep., 
1 hr. ; 2 units. 

2-b. Extension Organization and Methods. A brief history of the 
origin and development of extension work, in agriculture and home 
economics in the state and nation. Lectures on extension methods and 
practices. Actual demonstrations as put on in different parts of the 
state will be given by members of the resident and extension staff. 
Purpose of the subject is to furnish a good understanding of the nature 

99 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

of extension organization, its cooperative relationships, and especially 
extension methods and the results to be attained in the field. 

Lee, 2 hrs,; lab., lyi hrs.; prep., Zyi hrs.; 8 units. Sub- 
ject to be given under the direction of J. C. Kendall, 
Director of Extension Work. Elective for Seniors in 
Agriculture and required of Seniors in Home Economics 
Extension Course. 

3-c. Supervised Extension Work. During the third term of the 

senior year a limited number of students in agriculture and home 

economics with the approval of the Dean of the College and the Director 

of the Extension Service will be allowed to do supervised extension work 

in the state under the immediate direction of a member of the extension 

staff. At least twelve weeks will be devoted to this field work. Mr. 

Kendall. 

Prerequisite: Agriculture 2-b. Required of Seniors in 
Home Economics Extension Course. Field work, 50 units. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

M. Gale Eastman, Processor 

1-a. Cooperative Marketing. The essential characteristics of co- 
operative development in this country, something of its present impor- 
tance, and the principles underlying sound organization. Laws relating 
to corporations and cooperatives, problems in finance, and membership 
and business policies reviewed. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 5 
hrs. ; 8 units. 

2-a. Farm Management. Deals with the development of farming 
as a business; types of farming, size of farms, cropping systems, livestock 
problems, buying, selling, etc. Practical problems in working out 
factors of efficiency, balance, etc. 

Required of Seniors in Agriculture, except in Forestry. 
Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 11 units. 

3-b. Rural Economics. History and economy in the development 
of rural living, including an inquiry into the present utilization of agri- 
cultural resources. 

Required of Juniors or Seniors in Agriculture. Lee. , 3 hrs. ; 
prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

100 



AGRONOMY 

4-b. Farm Accounting. Lectures, reference work and farm prob- 
lems relating to the principles of accounting as applied to farm records 
and farm cost accounts. Laboratory exercises include sets of com- 
plete cost accounts taken from actual farms. 

Required of Juniors in certain courses. Lee, 1 hr. ; lab., 2 
hrs.; prep., 5 hrs.; 8 units. 

5-a. Agricultural Statistics. An elementary subject designed to 
acquaint the agricultural student with some everyday problems of chance 
in biological phenomena and to give him some immunity against snap- 
judgments, and some basis for the interpretation of current research 
information. 

Elective for Seniors in Agriculture. Lee, 1 hr. ; lab., 2 hrs. ; 
prep., 5 hrs. ; 8 units. 

6-a, 7-b. Agricultural Economics Seminar. XA'eekly discussions 
of current and fundamental economic problems, providing 1^ to 5 units 
of credit and adjusted more or less to the needs and desires of the group 
electing. 

Elective for Seniors in Agriculture and other students by 
permission. 

8-a, 9-b. Special Agricultural Economics. Graduate, or other ad- 
vanced credit, to satisfy a student's needs may be obtained in this subject 
in special cases by permission of the head of the department. 
Hours of meeting and units of credit to be arranged. 

AGRONOMY 

Frederick W. Taylor, Professor 
Leroy J. HiGGiNS, Instructor 

1-a. Agricultural Engineering. Lectures and recitations upon the 
mapping of farms; fencing; drainage; farm sanitation; tillage and har- 
vesting machinery; concrete construction; silos; farm motors; roads 
and principles of draft. Practical work In map making, laying out 
drains, rope splicing, comparing farm machines, etc. Prof. Taylor. 

Required of Sophomores in Agriculture. Lee, 3 hrs. ; lab., 
lyi hrs.; prep., 3^ hrs.; 9 units. 

2-a. Forage Crops. Text-books, lectures, and recitations covering 
the history, use, value, and methods of producing forage crops, includ- 

101 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

ing grasses, legumes, and roots. Practical work in judging and identi- 
fying in the field and in the laboratory. Mr. Higgins. 

Required of Juniors in certain courses. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 
hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 7 units. 

3-b. Cereal Crops. Text-books, lectures, and recitations covering 
the history, use, value and methods of producing cereal crops. Labora- 
tory work in identifying and judging grain plants and their products. 

Practically all the common field crops, including potatoes, tobacco, 
etc., will be considered in 2-a and 3-b. Plants will be studied with 
particular reference to New England conditions. Mr. Higgins. 

Required of Juniors in certain courses. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 
2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 7 units. 

4-c. Soils. Text-book and recitations upon the formation, kinds 

and physical properties of soils; the movements and conservation of soil 

moisture; the relation of heat and air to soil; the nature and physical 

effects of tillage and fertilizers; laboratory work and experimentation 

with soils to show the physical effects of different conditions and texture. 

Mr. Higgins. 

Required of Sophomores in Agriculture. Lee, 3 hrs. ; lab., 
2^ hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; 10 units. 

6-b. Fertilizers. Lectures, text-book and recitations upon the 
value, use and function of plant food materials, including manure, and 
upon the compounding and selecting of fertilizers. Prof. Taylor. 

Prerequisite: Agricultural Chemistry 1-a. Required of 
Seniors in certain courses. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 5 hrs.; 8 
units. 

11-b, 12-c. Special Agronomy. Advanced work for students inter- 
ested in some particular phase of agronomy. No class exercises. The 
hours and kind of work must be arranged with the department before 
the subject is elected. Prof. Taylor. 

Prerequisites: Agronomy 1-a to 4-c inclusive. Elective 
for Seniors. Number of units to be arranged. 

13-b. Farm Shop. Repairing farm implements and tools such as 
wagons, sleds, hammers, forks, shovels, etc.; repair and oiling of har- 
nesses; splicing of hay ropes; reeving a set of block and tackle; setting 
horse shoes; operating, adjusting and repairing various farm implements. 
Mr. Ham. 

102 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Required of Teach. Train. Seniors. Rec, 1 hr.; prep., 

1 hr. ; lab., 5 hrs.; 7 units. 

14-b. Agricultural Seminar. Library and reference work, the prep- 
aration of bibliographies, a study of the work and history of agricul- 
tural colleges and experiment stations. Prof. Taylor. 

Elective for Seniors in Agriculture. Rec, 1 hr. ; prep., 2 
hrs.; 3 units. 

15-a. Soil Management. A study of the applications of the facts 
and principles of chemistry, botany, and physics which are of use in 
planning constructive systems of soil management and in increasing the 
productive capacities of soils. Mr. Higgins. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 5 
hrs.; 8 units. 

16-b. Advanced Field Crops. Detailed consideration will be given 

to the history and production of the principal field crops of the state like 

hay, potatoes, silage corn, the clovers, oats, and pasture grasses. Mr. 

Higgins. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 5 hrs.; 
8 units. 

17-b. Seed Testing. A study of the ofhcial method of analyzing 

agricultural seeds for purity and germination, involving studies in the 

identification of seeds, as well as the technique of using equipment in 

weighing, germinating, counting, estimating, etc., for official reports. 

Mr. Higgins. 

Prerequisite: Botany 3-c. Elective for a very limited 
number of students. Hours arranged. Lab., 4 hrs,; prep., 

2 hrs. 6 units. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Carl L. Martin, Assistant Professor 
D. E. Rusk, Assistant 

1-a. Types and Breeds of Livestock. A study of the different 
breeds of horses, cattle, sheep, and swine in respect to their origin, his- 
tory, development, characteristics, and adaptability to different condi- 
tions of climate and soil. One afternoon each week is devoted to judging 
the different breeds. Mr. Rusk. 

Required of Freshmen in Agriculture. Lee, 3 hrs.; lab., 

2 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 9 units. 

103 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

2-c. Livestock Judging. The work consists of a study of the prin- 
ciples and practice of judging horses, beef cattle, sheep, and swine, and 
of the market classes and grades of horses and meat animals. 

For a part of the laboratory work, trips are taken to some of the best 
breeding establishments in New England. 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 1-a. Required of Soph- 
omores electing Animal Husbandry. Lab., 5 hrs. ; 5 units. 

3-a. Feeds and Feeding. A study of the character, composition, 
and digestibility of feed stulTs, and the methods of feeding ditTerent kinds 
of farm animals. Numerous samples of grains and by-products are 
used for the purpose of familiarizing the students with the different feed 
stuffs. Practice is given in calculating rations for various purposes. 

Required of Seniors in Animal Husbandry, General and 
Teacher Training courses. Lee, 3 hrs.; lab., lyi hrs.; 
prep., 4>^ hrs.; 10 units. 

4-a. Anatomy of Farm Animals. Lectures and recitations upon the 
form and structure of the domesticated animals. Skeletons, various 
anatomical specimens, models, charts, and lantern slides are used to 
make the subject as practical as possible. The purposes of this subject 
are to show the relation between the skeleton and the form and function 
of the animal, and to serve as a foundation for the intelligent study of 
animal diseases and ailments. Prof. Martin. 

Required of Juniors in Animal Husbandry. Lee, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 4>^ hrs.; 7>2 units. 

5-b. Animal Diseases. A study of the more common economic 
infectious diseases of farm animals, their prevention and treatment, and 
general sanitation. Prof. Martin. 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 4-a. Required of Jun- 
iors in Animal Husbandry. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; 
7>^ units. 

6-c. Animal Diseases. Continuation of 5-b, together with a study 
of the common non-infectious diseases and ailments of farm animals, 
and their treatment: unsoundness of the horse; the principles of horse- 
shoeing, and the practice of simple surgical operations. Prof. Martin. 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 4-a. Required of Jun- 
iors in Animal Husbandry. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; 
7K units. 

104 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

7-a. Animal Breeding. A study of the principles and practices of 
breeding farm animals. Practice is given in tracing out and studying 
pedigrees. 

Required of Seniors in Animal Husbandry. Lee, 3 hrs.; 
lab,, lyi hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs,; 10 units. 

8-c. Livestock Markets and Products. A study of the various kinds 
of livestock markets and of the methods and regulations applying to 
the transportation of livestock. Some time will be spent in a study of 
the livestock centers, the stock yards, and the government inspection 
of animals before and after slaughter. The butchering of animals on 
the farm and the various cuts of meat will be discussed. Occcasional 
trips will be taken to slaughter houses and packing plants. 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 1-a. Required of Sen- 
iors in Animal Husb?ndry. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep,, 4>^ hrs,; 
1^2 units. 

9-c. Sheep and Swine Husbandry. A consideration of the judging, 
breeding, feeding, management and preparation for the show ring of 
sheep and swine, with special reference to New Hampshire conditions. 

Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 1-a and 3-a. Required 
of Juniors in Animal Husbandry. Lee, 3 hrs.; lab,, 2>^ 
hrs. ; prep,, 3 hrs, ; 8>^ units. 

10-b. Management of Horses and Beef Cattle. Lectures and reci- 
tations upon the care of brood mares and cows, management of stallions 
and bulls, the breaking and training of colts, preparation of animals for 
the show ring, the management of pure bred beef herds, and the feeding 
and handling of steers. 

Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 1-a and 3-a, Re- 
quired of Seniors in Animal Husbandry. Lee, 3 hrs.; 
lab., iy2 hrs,; prep., 3 hrs.; 8>^ units. 

12-c. Animal Husbandry Seminar. Library and reference work and 
the preparation of papers on various animal husbandry subjects of 
timely importance. 

Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 3-a, 5-b, 6-c, and 7-a. 
Required of Seniors in Animal Husbandry. Lee, 1 hr,; 
lab., lyi hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 5>^ units. 

105 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

ARCHITECTURE 

Eric T. Huddleston, Professor 

Chester E. Dodge, Assistant Professor 

Paul H. Shramm, Instructor 

Arnold Perreton, Instructor 

Major: 150 time units of departmental and related de- 
partmental subjects, exclusive of elementary subjects and 
those listed as prerequisites. 

Prerequisites: Major in Architecture, Art 7-a, 8-b, 9-c, 
Arch. 6-b, 7-c, 2-b, 3^, 11-b, U-c, Hist. 113-a, 128-b, 
129-^. 

ARCHITECTURE 

2-b, 3-c. Elements of Design. An introductory lecture course to the 
field of architectural design, discussing the influence of materials, archi- 
tectural elements, their function and form, walls, moldings, openings, 
columns, roofs, plans, and ornament, followed by an analysis of the 
principles governing architectural design. Mr. Perreton. 

Required of Freshmen in Architecture. Rec, 2 hrs.; 
prep., 3 hrs.; 5 units. 

4-a, 5-b, 6-c. History of Architecture. Lectures with assigned read- 
ing on the historical development of the different periods of architecture 
and an analysis of the chief contributions each period made toward a 
constructive and artistic advance in architectural design. Mr. Perreton. 

Required of Sophomores in Architecture. Rec, 1 hr. . 
prep., lyi hrs.; 2>2 units. 

8-b, 9-c. Graphics. Exercises in constructive and descriptive 

geometry with applications to developments and intersections, shades 

and shadows, and perspective. Prof. Dodge. 

Prerequisite: M. E. 5-a. Required of Freshmen in Archi- 
tecture. Draw., 5 hrs.; 5 units. (Formerly 6-b, 7-c.) 

11-b, 12-c. Elements of Architecture. Drafting room exercises in 

the study of the classic orders of architecture, and elementary studies in 

architectural composition and design. Prof. Dodge and Mr. Perreton. 

Required of Freshmen in Architecture. Draw., 5 hrs.; 
5 units. 

20-a, 21-b. Domestic Architecture. Lectures and recitations de- 
voted to a brief study of the history of domestic architecture; the rela- 
tion of the house plan to home making and to the individual site, to the 

106 



ARCHITECTURE 

garden, to accessory buildings, and to the community; supplemented by 
drafting room exercises in the use of drawing instruments as a prepara- 
tion for further study in house planning. Problems are issued to the 
student for graphical solution such as would be presented to an archi- 
tect by a prospective home builder. Prof. Huddleston. 

Required of Sophomores in Home Economics. 20-a: 
Lee, 1 hr. ; prep., 1 hr.; draw., 2 hrs. ; 4 units. 21-b: 
draw., 4 hrs.; 4 units. 

22-c. Domestic Architecture. A continuation of Arch. 21-b, taking 
up the study of an individual building problem, and making working 
drawings for a small frame house designed by the student to conform to 
specific requirements. Prof. Huddleston. 

Prerequisite: Arch. 21-b. Elective by permission only. 
Hours and units to be arranged. 

23-a. Domestic Architecture. Problems in house planning are 

issued to the student for graphical solution such as would be presented 

to an architect by a prospective home builder, followed with the study 

of an individual building problem, and making working drawings for a 

small frame house designed by the student to conform to specified 

requirements. Prof. Huddleston, 

Required of Seniors in Architecture. Rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 
1 hr.; draw., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

30-a, 31-b, 32-c. Materials of Construction. Their properties and 
uses. Considerations affecting their choice for various parts of the 
structure. General types of structures classified according to use and 
materials used. Structural units. (Retaining walls. Footings, Piers, 
Columns, Beams, Girders, Trusses, etc.) Their place in the structure. 
Prof. Dodge. 

Required of Juniors in Architecture. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 
4>^ hrs.; 7>^ units. 

33-a, 34-b, 35-c. Building Construction. Problems in the determina- 
tion of loads and stresses and principle^ of stability in buildings. Study 
of the fundamental principles involved in the different types of building 
construction and some idea of the typical proportions imposed by the 
use of different kinds of materials. Theory and practice in structural 
design, including the making of complete framing drawings of a building. 
This work is made a part of the student's thesis and must be carried in 
parallel with Arch. 60-a, 61-b, 62-c. Prof. Dodge. 

107 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite: Arch. 32-c. Required of Seniors in Archi- 
tecture. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 1>^ hrs.; draw., 3 hrs.; lyi 
units. 

39-a. Building Sanitation. A study of water, soil, waste, and vent 
pipe systems within the building; plumbing fixtures, traps, etc., and 
their installation, and the fundamentals of the layout of the above in 
different types of buildings. Prof. Dodge. 

Required of Seniors in Architecture. Rec, 1 hr.; prep., 
\yi hrs.; lyi units. 

41-b. Professional Relations. Discussions and assigned reading 
covering the personal, ethical, business, and legal relations of the 
architect with clients, contractors, craftsmen, etc., and the relations 
that should exist between the architect and the community in which he 
lives. Prof. Huddleston. 

Required of Seniors in Architecture. Rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 
3 hrs.; 5 units. 

50-a, 51-b, 52-c. Architectural Design. Class "B," Analytiques, 
programs of the Beaux Arts Institute of Design will be used as the basis 
for a progressive series of problems in architectural planning and design. 
Mr. Perreton. 

Prerequisite: Arch. 12-c and Art 22-c. Required of 
Sophomores in Architecture. First term: draw., 14 hrs.; 
14 units. Second and third terms: draw., 16 hrs. ; 16 units. 

53-a, 54-b, 55-c. Architectural Design. A continuation of 52-c 
with Class "B" Project problems in architectural design, composition 
and planning. Mr. Perreton. 

Prerequisite: Arch 52-c. Required of Juniors in Architec- 
ture. Draw., 16 hrs.; 16 units. 

56-a, 57-b, 58-c. Architectural Design. Class "A" Project prob- 
lems issued by the Beaux Arts Institute of Design will be used as a basis 
for advanced study of architectural design. Mr. Perreton. 

Prerequisite: Arch. 55-c. Elective by permission only. 
Units to be arranged. 

60-a, 61-b, 62-c. Architectural Thesis. The design of a building 
to conform to specified requirements such as would obtain in actual 
practice, followed by complete working drawings and details, including 
framing, heating, plumbing, and electric plans. This work will be made 

108 



ART 

to conform to current practice in an architect's office. Profs. Huddle- 
ston, Dodge and Mr. Perreton. 

Prerequisite: Arch, 52-c. Required of Seniors in Architec- 
ture. First term: draw., 10 hrs.; 10 units. Second and 
third terms: draw., 16 hrs.; 16 units. 

ART 

Schedule the following subjects as Art 7-a, 8-b, etc. 

7-a. Design. Studio work designed to bring out the latent talents 
of the individual for graphical expression. Original ideas will be guided 
through the processes of development by criticisms and suggestions 
only, the student being given perfect freedom for self expression. Mr. 
Shramm. 

Elective. Draw., 4 hrs.; 4 units. 

8-b, 9-c. Design. Studio exercises in pencil, pen and ink, and brush 
of lines, space arrangements, proportion of line and form, symmetry and 
balance, supplemented with illustrated lectures presenting a general 
historical background in the various branches of art expression. Mr. 
Shramm. 

Required of Freshmen in Architecture. Lee, 1 hr.; prep., 
\y2 hrs.; draw., 4 hrs.; 6^4 units. 

10-a, 11-b, 12-c. Free-hand Drawing. Studio exercises in charcoal 
from architectural details and plaster casts of historic ornament and 
the human form. Mr. Shramm. 

Prerequisite: Art 9-c. Required of Sophomores in 
Architecture. Draw., 5 hrs.; 5 units. 

13-a. Color and Sketching. Weather permitting, sketching from 
nature with special emphasis on tree and shrubbery forms. Studio 
exercises in color theories, harmonies and qualities as a basis for color 
studies adapted to architectural rendering. Mr. Shramm. 

Prerequisite: Art 12-c. Required of Juniors in Architec- 
ture. Draw., 4 hrs.; 4 units.^ 

14r-b. Modeling. Studio exercises in clay modeling from casts of 
historic ornament and the human form as a training in the perception 
of form in the round. Mr. Shramm. 

Prerequisite: Art 13-a. Required of Juniors in Architec- 
ture. Lab., 4 hrs.; 4 units. 

109 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

15-c. Life Drawing and Composition. Studio exercises in charcoal 

and color from the living model and studies in composition. 

Mr. Shramm. 

Prerequisite: Art 14-b. Required of Juniors in Architec- 
ture. Draw., 4 hrs.; 4 units. 

16-a, 17-b, 18-c. Advanced Free-hand Drawing. Studio work 

arranged to meet the needs of those students who show special ability 

and are judged capable of doing individual work of an advanced nature. 

Mr. Shramm. 

Special permission must be obtained from the head of the 
department before registering in this subject. Hours and 
units to be arranged. 

BOTANY 

Ormond R. Butler, Professor 
Marian E. Mills, Assistant Professor 
Stuart Dunn, Instructor 

Major: 150 time units in Botany and cognate courses ex- 
clusive of elementary subjects. Chemistry 1-a, 2-b and 
3-c must be taken and will be counted as part of the 
major requirement. 

1-a. General Botany. An introductory study of flowering plants 
with special emphasis on the structure and functions of organs. Prof. 
Mills. 

Required of Freshmen in Agriculture. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 
4 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 8 units. 

2-b. General Botany. A continuation of 1-a. The study of 
selected types of algae, fungi, emphasizing growth habits, reproduction, 
evolutionary development and economic importance. Prof. Mills. 

Prerequisite: Botany 1-a. Required of Freshmen in 
Agriculture. Lee. , 2 hrs. ; lab. , 4 hrs. ; prep. , 2 hrs. ; 8 units. 

3-c. General Botany. A continuation of 2-b. The study of the 
life histories of mosses, ferns and gymnosperms; the geographic distribu- 
tion of economic plants of North America. Evolution and heredity. 
Prof. Mills. 

Prerequisite: Botany 2-b. Required of Freshmen in Agri- 
culture. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 4 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 8 units. 

110 



BOTANY 

4-b, 5-c. Plant Physiology. Structure and properties of the cell; 
absorption and movement of water; metabolism; growth and irritability. 
Mr. Dunn. 

Prerequisite: Botany 3-c. One year of Chemistry. Re- 
quired of Juniors in Forestry and Seniors in Horticulture. 
Lee, 1 hr.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 8 units. 

6-a. Plant Histology. Characterization and differentiation of plant 
tissues; micro-technique. Mr. Dunn. 

Prerequisite: Botany 3-c. Lab., 6 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 8 
units. 

8-a. General Bacteriology. The study of the morphology and 
physiology of bacteria and related organisms; the principles of steriliza- 
tion; preparation of media; technique of staining; methods of isolation 
and cultivation. Prof. Mills. 

Prerequisite: One year of Chemistry. Required of all 
Home Economics Juniors. Lee, 2 hrs. ; lab., 4 hrs. ; prep., 
2 hrs.; 8 units. 

8.5-b. Applied Microbiology. Standard methods of examination of 
milk, water, and sewage; the relation of microorganisms to the spoilage 
of food and food poisoning; organisms pathogenic to man and means of 
control. Prof. Mills. 

Prerequisite: Bacteriology 8-a. Required of all Home 
Economics Juniors. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 4 hrs.; prep., 2 
hrs. ; 8 units. 

10-b, 11-c. Agricultural Bacteriology. A study of the morphology 
and physiology of the bacteria, and the practical application of bacteriol- 
ogy to agriculture, special attention being given to the relation of micro- 
organisms to the soil, the dairy industry, diseases of plants and animals, 
and the maintenance of pure water supplies. Prof. Mills. 

Required of all Agricultural Sophomores. Lee, 2 hrs.; 
lab., iy2 hrs.; prep., 3>^ hrs.; 8 units. 

12-a. Plant Pathology. The bacterial and fungous diseases of plants, 
their symptoms, cause and prevention. Mr. Dunn. 

Prerequisite: Botany 3-c. Required of Juniors in Horti- 
culture and Seniors in Forestry and Teacher Trammg. 
Lee, 1 hr.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 8 units. 

13-b. Plant Pathology. A continuation of 12-a. 

Ill 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite: Botany 12-a. Required of Juniors in Horti- 
culture and Seniors in Forestry. Lee, 1 hr.; lab., 5 hrs.; 
prep., 2 hrs.; 8 units. 

15-a, 16-b, 17-c. Advanced Botany. The subject-matter will de- 
pend upon the training and desire of the student. It cannot be elected 
without previous consultation. Prof. Butler, Prof. Mills and Mr. Dunn. 

Units to be arranged. 

18-b. Plant Pathology. Lectures on the fungous diseases of our 
economic plants, their symptoms, cause and prevention. Mr. Dunn. 

Prerequisite: Botany 12-a. Required of Teacher Training 
Seniors. Lee, 1 hr. ; prep., 2 hrs.; 3 units. 

19-c. Systematic Botany. A study of the higher plants of our native 
flora. The student is required to prepare an herbarium of 60 specimens. 
Prof. Mills. 

Field trips; laboratory work; occasional lectures. Field 
trips and lab., 4 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 6 units. 

CHEMISTRY 

Harold A. Iddles, Professor 
Melvin M. Smith, Assistafit Professor 
Heman C. Fogg, Assistant Professor 
Lawrence H. Opdycke, Assistant Professor 
Richard H. Kimball, Instructor 
Albert F. Daggett, Instructor 
Sherwood P. Smedley, Instructor 
Harold E. Abbott, Assistant 
Wilfred B. Krabek, Assistant 

Major: 150 time units in Chemistry and cognate courses 
exclusive of elementary subjects, 

1-a. Inorganic Chemistry. Lectures and recitations on general and 
theoretical chemistry. Solution of chemical problems will be required. 
Prof. Iddles and Prof. Smith. 

Required of all Freshmen in the College of Technology 
and Liberal Arts majors in Chemistry. Lee. and rec, 
3 hrs.; lab., 2}4 hrs.; prep., 4J/2 hrs.; 10 units. 

2-b, 3-c. Inorganic Chemistry. A continuation of Chemistry 1-a. 
Prof. Iddles and Prof. Smith. 

112 



CHEMISTRY "!" 

Required of Freshmen in Chemistry courses. Lee. and 
rec, 3 hrs.; lab., lyi hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; 10 units. 

5-b, 6-c. Inorganic Chemistry. Lectures and recitations on gen- 
era! and theoretical chemistry. Prof. Smith and Mr. Daggett. 

Required of Freshmen in Mechanical, Electrical, Civil 
and Industrial Engineering. Rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 2>^ hrs.; 
prep., 4^ hrs.; 10 units. 

7-a, 8-b, 9-c. Inorganic Chemistry. • Lectures and recitations on 
general chemistry and its application to everyday life. Prof. Smith, 
Prof. Opdycke and Mr. Smedley. 

Elective for Liberal Arts students. Rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 1)4. 
hrs.; prep., 4>2 hrs.; 10 units. 

10-a, 11-b, 12-c. Inorganic Chemistry. Lectures and recitations 
in chemistry as applied to agriculture. Prof. Smith and Mr. Smedley. 

Required of Freshmen in Agriculture. Rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 
lyi hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 8>2 units. 

14-b, 15-c. Inorganic Chemistry. Lectures and recitations on 
general chemistry with special reference to Home Economics problems. 
Prof. Smith. 

Required of Freshmen in Home Economics. Rec, 3 hrs.; 
lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 12 units. 

22-c. Qualitative Analysis. Laboratory work, with occasional 
lectures and recitations. The work includes the detection of the more 
familiar acids and bases in both simple and complex mixtures. Mr. 
Daggett. 

Parallel: Chemistry 3-c. Required of Freshmen in 
Chemistry. Lee, 1 hr.; Lab., 10 hrs.; 11 units. 

23-a. Qualitative Analysis. A continuation of 22-c. Mr. 
Daggett. 

Required of Sophomores in Chemistry. Lab., 5 hrs.; 
5 units. 

25-a, 26-b, 27-c. Introductory Qualitative and Quantitative Analy- 
sis. Laboratory practice.with occasional lectures and recitations. The 
course is especially adapted to the needs of Liberal Arts and Pre-medical 
students. It should be taken only as a sequence. Mr. Daggett. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 9-c. Lab., 7>^ hrs.; lYz units. 

113 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

28-b, 29-c. Quantitative Analysis. A preliminary study of quan- 
titative analysis to familiarize the student with the general methods of 
chemical manipulation and analysis. Prof. Fogg. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 23-a. Required of Sophomores 
in Chemistry. Elective for Sophomores, Juniors and 
Seniors in Liberal Arts provided laboratory facilities per- 
mit. Lab., lYz hrs.; prep., 1 hr. ; 8>^ units. 

30-a, 31-b, 32-c. Quantitative Analysis. A continuation of Quan- 
titative Analysis. Prof. Fogg. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 29-c. Required of Juniors in 
Chemistry. Elective for Liberal Arts students. Lab., 
10 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 12 units. 

40-a, 41-b, 42-c. Organic Chemistry. The lectures deal with the 
principal classes of organic compounds, aliphatic and aromatic, with 
emphasis upon class reactions and structural theory. Prof. Iddles. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 3-c. Required of Sophomores 
in Chemistry and Junior Chemists, and Junior Agricul- 
tural Chemists. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 4^ hrs.; 7>^ units. 

43-a, 44-b, 45-c. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. The work in this 
subject consists mainly of laboratory practice in preparing and purify- 
ing organic compounds. Lectures and recitations will be held from 
time to time in connection with the practice. Mr. Kimball. 

Parallel: Chemistry 40-a. Required of Sophomores in 
Chemistry and Senior Agricultural Chemists. Lab., 5 hrs. ; 
5 units. 

46-a, 47-b, 48-c. Organic Chemistry. Lectures and recitations. 
An introductory course in the study of the chemistry of carbon com- 
pounds considered with the needs of a pre-medical student in mind. 
Mr. Kimball. 

Prerequisite: Oneyear Freshman Chemistry. Elective for 
Liberal Arts students. Required of Junior Pre-medicals. 
Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

49-a, 50-b, 51-c. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. The work in 
this subject consists mainly of laboratory practice in preparing and 
purifying organic compounds. Lectures and recitations will be held 
from time to time in connection with the practice. This is a companion 
course to 46-a, 47-b, 48-c, and must be taken parallel with these 
courses. Mr. Kimball. 

114 



CHEMISTRY 

Elective for Liberal Arts students. Required of Junior 
Pre-medicals. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 5 hrs.; 6 units. 

152-a, 153-b, 154-c. Advanced Organic Chemistry. A considera- 
tion of the more advanced theories of organic chemistry, either leading 
to further work in the subject, or in connection with other branches of 
chemistry or with medicine. Mr. Kimball. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 42-c or 48-c. Required of Jun- 
iors in Chemistry who intend to take their thesis in Or- 
ganic Chemistry. Elective for Technology, Liberal Arts or 
Agricultural students. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; 7>^ 
units. (Formerly 52-a, 53-b, 54-c.) 

66-a, 67-b, 68-c. Elementary Physical Chemistry. A course de- 
voted to those parts of physical and theoretical chemistry which have 
found important applications in physiology, bacteriology and other 
branches of biological science. Prof. Opdycke. 

Prerequisite: One year Freshman Chemistry. Rec, 3 
hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; 7^ units. This is a course designed 
particularly for the pre-medical student. 

160-a, 161-b, 162-c. Physical Chemistry. A study of chemical 
theory, covering vapor density, molecular weights, specific heat, diffu- 
sion of gases, solutions, ionization, catalysis, celloids, thermo-chemistry, 
equilibrium, the phase rule, etc. Prof. Opdycke. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 29-c, Math. 8-b, Physics 8-c. 
Required of Juniors in Chemistry and Senior Agricultural 
Chemists. Elective for Liberal Arts students. Rec, 3 
hrs.; prep., 4^ hrs.; 7>^ units. (Formerly 60-a, 61-b, 
62-c.) 

163-a, 164-b, 165-c. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. Prof. Op- 
dycke. 

Parallel: Chemistry 160-a. Required of Juniors in 
Chemistry and Senior Agricultural Chemists. Lab., 5 hrs. ; 
prep., 2 hrs.; 7 units. (Formerly 63-a, 64-b, 65-c.) 

100-a, 101-b, 102-c. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Prof. Fogg. 

> Prerequisite: Chemistry 29-c. Required of Juniors in 
the Technology Course in Chemistry who are intending to 
take their thesis in Inorganic Chemistry. Elective for 
others. Rec, 2 hrs.; lab., lyi hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 7>^ 
units. (Formerly 80-a, 81-b, 82-c.) 

110-a, 111-b, 112-c. Industrial Chemistry. Prof. Opdycke. 

115 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 3-c. Required of Seniors in 
Technology Course in Chemistry. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 
4>^ hrs.; 7>^ units. 

70-a, 71-b, 72-c. Seminar. A weekly meeting to discuss recent 
topics of interest in Chemistry. Prof. Iddles and Staff. 1% units. 

(Formerly 130-a, 131-b, 132-c.) 

SQ-a, 81-b, 82-c. Thesis. The time is devoted to some selected 
subject, and the student is required to present a thesis showing him to 
be a careful manipulator and a person of independent thought. Mem- 
bers of the Staff. 

For Seniors in Chemistry who have completed Chem- 
istry 32-c and 42-c. Technology Students: Lab., 15 hrs.; 
prep., ly2 hrs.; 17>^ units. Liberal Arts Students: Lab., 
10 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 12 units. (Formerly 133-a, 134-b, 
135-c.) 

For subjects primarily for graduate students, see Catalog of the Grad- 
uate School. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Edmond W. Bowler, Associate Professor 
Russell R. Skelton, Instructor 
Harold I. Leavitt, Instructor 
James S. Chamberlin, Lecturer 

1-c. Plane Surveying. Theory and use of level and transit. Field 
work consists of chaining, differential and profile leveling, angle measure- 
ment and traversing. Prof. Bowler and Mr. Leavitt. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 2-b. Required of all Fresh- 
men in the College of Technology, except those taking 
Architecture and Chemical Engineering. Rec, 1 hr.; 
lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 1}4 hrs.; 7}4 units. 

2-a. Topographical Surveying. Adjustments of levels and tran- 
sits. Theory and use of levels, transits, plane tables, stadia, precise 
base line methods and topographical surveys. A topographical map of 
a selected area is completed from survey notes obtained in field work. 
Prof. Bowler and Mr. Leavitt. 

Prerequisites: Civil Engineering 1-c and Mechanical 
Engineering 3-c. Required of Sophomores in Civil 
Engineering. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 1)4 hrs.; 7>^ 
units. 

116 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

3-b. Topographical Drawing. Exercises in lettering, conventional 
signs, and map making, including the preparation of a topographical 
map from survey notes obtained in Civil Engineering 2-a. Mr. Skelton. 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 2-a. Required of Sopho- 
mores in Civil Engineering. Lab., 5 hrs. ; 5 units. 

4-c. Railway Curves. Problems of curves used in railway and 
highway location. Theory and methods of layout of simple and 
compound curves and spirals are studied. Mr. Skelton. 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 2-a. Required of Sopho- 
mores in Civil Engineering. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., lyi hrs.; 
prep., \yi hrs.; 5 units. 

5-a. Surveying. Use of level and transit as they apply to differen- 
tial and profile leveling, topographic mapping of restricted areas as 
sites for buildings, in staking out and supervising work under con- 
struction. Prof. Dodge. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 3-c. Required of Junior 
Architectural students. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 
\yi hrs.; 7>2 units. 

6-c, 7-a. Surveying. This subject is comparable to Civil Engineer- 
ing 1-c and 2-a with the direct application to the problems found in 
Forestry and Agriculture. Prof. Bowler and Mr. Leavitt. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 22-c. Required of Sophomores 
and Juniors in Forestry. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 
Xyi hrs.; 7>^ units. 

8-b. Engineering Astronomy. A study of the underlying theories 
used in the reduction of astronomical observations for latitude, longitude, 
time and azimuth. Prof. Bowler. 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 2-a. Required of Sopho- 
mores in Civil Engineering. Rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 
5 units. 

20-c, 21-a. Highway Location. Preliminary and final location of 
about one mile of highway line. This includes making paper location, 
taking cross-sections, setting slope stakes, figuring quantities, etc 
Astronomical observations are made for determining of latitude and 
azimuth. Mr. Skelton. 

117 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 3-b and Civil Engineering 
4-c either in parallel or as a prerequisite. Required of 
Sophomores in Civil Engineering. 20-c: Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 
5 hrs. ; prep., 1>^ hrs.; l)/2 units. 21-a: Lab., 5 hrs.; 5 
units. 

22-a. Materials. Designed to acquaint the student with properties 

of the various structural materials used by the engineer, such as, stone, 

brick, cement, concrete, wood, steel and paints. Mr. Skelton. 

Prerequisites: Civil Engineering 20-c. Required of Jun- 
iors in Civil Engineering. Rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 5 
units. 

23-a, 24^b, 25-c. Economics of Highway Design. A study of 

location, design, construction and maintenance of highways and methods 

of financing and laws under which they are built and controlled in 

various states of the Union. Mr. Skelton. 

Prerequisites: Civil Engineering 20-c and 21-b. Re- 
quired of Seniors in Civil Engineering. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 
2^2. hrs.; prep., Xyi hrs.; 5 units. 

26-a, 27-b, 28-c. Economics of Railway Engineering and Timis- 

portation. A general course in railway construction and maintenance, 

and a study of the principles of motor truck transportation as it afifects 

railway transportation. Mr. Skelton. 

Prerequisites: Civil Engineering 23-a, either in parallel 
or as a prerequisite. Required of Seniors in Civil Engi- 
neering. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., lyi hrs.; prep., 1>2 hrs.; 5 units. 

41-b, 42-c. Hydraulics. Static pressures of liquids. Theory, co- 
efficients and use of orifices and weirs for measurement of flow of water. 
Derivation and application of formulas and friction factors in the 
flow through pipes and open channels. Theory and use of hydraulic 
machinery are given in the spring term. Prof. Bowler. 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 43-a. Required of 
Juniors in Civil Engineering. Rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 3 hrs.; 7 units. 

43-b, 44-c. Hydraulics. A study of the theory of fluid pressure 

and water in motion and the friction factors and the coefficients which 

apply to the use of water in the fields of Mechanical and Electrical 

Engineering. Prof. Getchell. 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 43-a. Required of 
Seniors in Mechanical, Electrical and Industrial Engineer- 
ing. 43-b: Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; 7>^ units. 44-c: 
Rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 5 units. 

118 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

45-a. Water Supply. Municipal supplies, including quantities 
required, sources, storage, distribution, equipment and accessory 
structures. Prof. Bowler. 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 42-c. Required of Seniors 
in Civil Engineering. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 2>^ hrs.; prep., lyi 
hrs.; 5 units. 

46-b. Water Purification. A study of slow sand and mechanical 
methods of water purification. Prof. Bowler. 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 45-a. Required of Seniors 
in Civil Engineering. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 2yi hrs.; prep., 1>^ 
hrs.; 5 units. 

47-b. Sewerage. The theory and problems in design of munici- 
pal sewerage. Prof. Bowler. 

Prerequisite : Civil Engineering 42-c. Required of Seniors 
in Civil Engineering. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 2^ hrs.; prep., 1>^ 
hrs.; 5 units. 

48-c. Sewage Disposal. A study of the laws governing the disposal 
of sewage and the various methods of sewage treatment. Prof. Bowler. 
Prerequisite : Civil Engineering 47-b. Required of Seniors 
in Civil Engineering. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 2}4 hrs.; prep., \yi 
hrs.; 5 units. 

49-a, 50-b, 51-c. Hydraulic Engineering. The study of run-off 
and drainage areas, stream regulation, the economic use of water for 
power purposes and the characteristics of hydraulic motors and power 
plants. Prof. Bowler. 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 42-c. Required of Sen- 
iors in Civil Engineering. Rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 5 
units. 

60-a, 61-b, 62-c. Stresses. The graphical and analytical methods 
for determining reactions, moments and shears in frame structures under 
static and dynamic loads and the stresses in individual members. Prof. 
Bowler. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8-b. Required of Juniors in 
Civil Engineering. Rec, 3 hrg.; lab., 2^ hrs.; prep., 4>^ 
hrs.; 10 units. 

63-a. Bridge Design. Theory and problems in design of steel and 
reinforced concrete highway and railway bridges. Mr. Skelton. 
Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 62-c. Required of Seniors 
in Civir Engineering. Rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 3 
hrs. ; 10 units. 

119 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

64-b. Concrete Structures. Theory and problems in design of 
plain and reinforced concrete structures, including retaining walls 
arches and frames of buildings. Mr. Skelton. 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 64-b. Required of Seniors 
in Civil Engineering. Rec, 2 hrs. ; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 3 
hrs. ; 10 units. 

65-c. Building Design. Theory and problems in design of steel 
trusses and frames of buildings. Mr. Skelton. 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 63-a. Required of Seniors 
in Civil Engineering. Rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 3 
hrs. ; 10 units. 

80-a, 81-b, 82-c, 83-a, 84-b, 85-c. Student Chapter of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers. An organization of Junior and Senior 
students in Civil Engineering. The subject consists of preparation and 
presentation of addresses on Civil Engineering topics by members, and 
in which the instructor present criticizes the work from the point-of- 
view of delivery, subject matter and terms used. Prof. Bowler. 

Required of Juniors and Seniors in Civil Engineering. 
Rec, 1 hr.; prep., >^ hr. ; \y^ units. 

86-c. Specifications. Principles of specification writing. Prof. 
Case. 

Rec, 1 hr.; prep., \}4 hrs.; 2}4 units. 

87-a, 88-b, 89-c. Seminar. Discussion of the broader aspects of 
the engineer's interest in public affairs. Mr. Chamberlin. 
One meeting a week. 

90-a, 91-b, 92-c. Thesis. The thesis embodies research or com- 
mercial investigation in which equal emphasis is placed upon the 
composition and accuracy of subject matter. Prof. Bowler and Mr. 
Skelton. 

Required of Seniors in Civil Engineering. Rec, 1 hr.; 
prep., 4 hrs.; 5 units. 

93-s, 94-s. Cooperative Work. A practical application of the 
studies taken at the University, during the summer recess while em- 
ployed on work of a civil engineering character. The students while 
thus employed will be under the general supervision of a member of the 
University faculty. The assignments following the Sophomore year 
will be on surveying parties and during the summer following the 

120 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Junior year on construction work. Reports on work done are sub- 
mitted early in the school term following the period of this employment. 
Required of Sophomores and Juniors in Civil Engineering. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

John M. Fuller, Professor 
Herbert C. Moore, Instructor 
Bert E. Huggins, Instructor 

1-b. Milk and Its Products. A general study of the subjects indi- 
cated. Such topics as the composition of milk, common dairy processes, 
market milk, and brief studies in the manufacture of dairy products are 
included. Prof. Fuller. 

Required of Sophomores in Agriculture. Lee, 3 hrs.; 
lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 5 hrs.; 10 units. Elective as a lecture 
course for other students. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 4^ hrs.; 
1^2 units. 

2-c. Dairy Cattle Judging. Animals in the college herd and in 
nearby herds will be judged. Prof. Fuller, 

All students interested in the dairy cattle judging team 
should elect this subject. Required of students in Dairy 
Husbandry. Lee, 1 hr.; lab., 2>^ hrs.; prep., \j4 hrs.; 
5 units. 

3-a, 3.5-b. Milk Production. The field of dairy husbandry in its 
relation to the producer. Feeding dairy animals; systems of herd feed- 
ing; silage and soiling; raising dairy animals; dairy herd development; 
dairy barns; advanced registry management; fitting dairy animals for 
show; dairy cattle judging. Prof. Fuller. 

Required of Seniors in Dairy Husbandry, 3-a, Lee, 
3 hrs.; lab., 2^ hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; 10 units. 3.5-b, Lee, 
2 hrs.; lab., 2)4 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 7>^ units. 

4-b. Testing Dairy Products. A ^thorough study of the Babcock 
test, with special work in testing various dairy products for butter fat; 
acidity tests for milk and cream; moisture tests for butter and cheese; 
use of lactometer. Mr. Moore. 

Prerequisite: Dairy Husbandry 1-b. Required of Juniors 
in Dairy Husbandry. Lee, 1 hr.; lab., 4 hrs.; prep., 2}^ 
hrs.; 7^ units. 

121 



UNIXKRSITY OF NFAV HAMPSHIRE 

5-a. Market Milk. I'ood value ol milk; prodiuMUii, haiulliiig;, and 

distributiui; luaiket and ocrtiiied milk; d.ur> farm inspcition; control of 

milk supply. Mr. Moore. 

rrerecjuisite: Pairx Husbandry 1 h. Required of Seniors 
in Pairy Husbamlry. Fee., 3 hrs.; lab., 2}i Ins.; prep., 
Ay^ hrs.; 10 units. 

6-c. Ice Cream and Cheese Making. {\^ I evtures and laboratory 

work eoverinij the tnanufaeture of the more important types of cheese; 

(2) the making, handling, and marketing of ice cream and ices. Mr. 

Moore. 

Prerequisite: Hairy Husbandr\ I b or 8 a. Reiiuireti of 
Seniors in Paitx I lusb.\ndr>-. Fee. 2 hrs.; lab.. 5 hrs.; 
prep.. .> Ins. ; 10 units. 

7 a. Butter Makinj;. A study of the secretion .uul oi the chemical 

and physic.\l properties of milk; pasteurization; cream ripening, starters, 

churning; organization .md operation of factories. Mr. Moore. 

Prerequisite: Pairy 1 lusbandry 1 b. Reiiuired of Juniors 
in P.iir\ llusb.indr\. Fee. 1 Ins.; l.ib.. 2 hrs.; prep.. 3 
hrs.; 7 imits. 

8-a. Domestic Dairying, \utriti\c \ .due of milk; market milk; 

moililicil milk; certitied milk; condensed milk: milk powder; fermented 

milk; butter; ciiecj^e; and ice cre.nn. l.d>or.itor\ cxenises are gi\en 

in the uMuufacture of dairy products. Mr. Moore. 

l-U\-tive for junims and Seniors in Home ICconomics .md 
in Liberal .\rls courses. Fee. 1 Ins.; lab., 2}4 hrs.: prep., 
v^ hre. ; 7\4 units. 

9 a. Dairy Bacteriology. Methoils of b.uteriological analysis of 

milk and its pioducts; relation of bacteria to milk and its products; 

study of elVect on bacteria in milk of separation, claritication. pastemiza- 

tion. aeration, and straining: and the application of bacteriological 

principles to the dairy industr\ . Mr. Moore. 

Prerequisite: Botany 11 c. Required of Juniors in Pairy 
Husbandry. Lee., 3 hrs.; lab., 4 hrs.; prep., v> hrs.; 10 
units. 

10-c. Dairy Seminar. Studies of experiment station and other lit- 
erature covering the field of dairy husbandry. Prof. 1- idler. 

Requireti of Seniors in Pairy Husbamlry. Flective tor 
other students. Fee. 2 hrs.; prep.. 3 iirs.; 5 units. 

122 



ECONOMICS AND ACCOUNTING 

11-c. Judging Dairy Products. The various standards and grades 
of dairy products will be studied. Practice will be given in judging 
milk, butter, cheese, and ice cream. Mr. Moore. 

Elective for all students. Lab., lyi hrs. ; 2>^ units. 

12-c. Advanced Dairy Cattle Judging. Comparative judging of 
dairy cattle, ^^^ritten summary covering subject of judging. Prof. 
Fuller. 

Prerequisite: Dairy Husbandry 2-c. Elective for Agricul- 
tural students. Lee, 1 hr.;lab., 1)4 hrs.; prep., Xyi hrs.; 5 
units. 

13-c. Advanced Dairy Science. Basic data, fundamental observa- 
tions, and discussions of research contributing to the present status of the 
dairy industry. Mr. Moore. 

Required of Seniors in Dairy Husbandry. Elective for 
other students who have adequate preparation in chem- 
istry and bacteriology. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 5 hrs.; 8 units. 

ECONOMICS AND ACCOUNTING 

Harry W. Smith, Professor 
Arthur W. Johnson, Associate Professor 
Norman Alexander, Associate Professor 
Hannibal G. Duncan, Associate Professor 
John D. Hauslein, Assistant Professor 
Clair W. Swonger, Instructor 
Carroll M. Degler, Instructor 

Major: 150 time units of departmental and related depart- 
mental subjects, exclusive of those of an elementary 
nature. 

Students preparing to major in Economics should present 
in addition to the regular major requirements the credits 
of Mathematics 101-a, 102-b, 103-c, History 29-a, 30-b, 
31-c, Political Science 104-a, 105-b, 106-c. 

Students registering in the Business Fundamentals Course after 
September 1, 1929, must obtain a grade of 75 in at least 100 time units 
from the following list of required subjects: Accounting 112-a, 113-b, 
114-c, Accounting 115-a, 116-b, 117-c, Economics 1-a, 2-b, 3-c, Eco- 
nomics 7-b, 8-c, Economics 10-a, Economics 13-a, 14-b, Economics 
23-b, Economics 7 1-a, 72-b, 73-c, Statistics 1-a, 2-b, Mathematics 
104-c. 

123 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

ECONOMICS 

Introductory Subjects. Group A 

1-a, 2-b, 3-c. Principles of Economics. This is a beginner's course 
and is planned for students who wish a general introduction to the field of 
Economics. Mr. Swonger, Mr. Degler. 

Required of all students majoring in Economics and of 
Business Fundamentals students. Elective for other 
Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

Service Subjects. Group B 
101-a, 102-b. Elementary Economics. This course is open only to 
Agricultural and Technology students. Mr. Degler. 
Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; 1}4 units. 

104-a. Economic History of the Working Classes. This course 

will trace the development of the laboring class from early times to the 

present, with emphasis upon recent labor conditions. Prof. Smith. 

For Juniors and Seniors in the College of Technology only. 
Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4^ hrs.; 7>^ units. 

105-b. Business Organization and Finance. This course will trace 
the evolution of the business unit from the individual entrepreneur to 
the modern business combination. It will deal with the financial and 
legal problems of each type, together with the legislative and govern- 
ment policies toward big business as revealed in trust legislation and 
court decisions. Mr. Swonger. 

For Juniors and Seniors in the College of Technology only. 
Lee or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4^ hrs.; 1}4 units. 

106-c. Law of Contracts. 

For Juniors and Seniors in the College of Technology only. 
Lee or rec, 2 hrs. ; prep., 3 hrs. ; 5 units. Prof. Alexander. 

50-c. Principles of Business. A general survey of the principles 

underlying modern business. Promotion, forms of organization, control 

of production, planning, handling of employees, advertising, selling, 

credit, accounting, business forecasting, etc. 

The credits of this subject will not be accepted to satisfy 
major requirements. Open only to Business Fundamentals 
Freshmen and students designated by the College of Agri- 
culture. Lee or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. (For- 
merly given as 50-a.) 

124 



ECONOMICS AND ACCOUNTING 

Advanced Subjects. Group C 

6-a. Economic and Commercial Geography. This subject aims to 
acquaint the student with the economic aspect of geography and to 
survey the chief industries of the world and the principal commodities 
of world trade. (Formerly given as 9-c.) Mr. Swonger. 

Required of Business Fundamentals students. Elective 
for Sophomores. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 6 hrs. ; 9 units. 

7-b, 8-c. Economic and Commercial History. This subject will 
trace the commercial and economic development of Europe and the 
United States. Special attention will be paid to this development 
during the last century. Mr. Degler. 

Required of Business Fundamentals students. Elective for 
Sophomores. Lee. or ree., 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

Prerequisite for the following courses: Completion of one yearns work in 
Principles of Economics except as designated 

10-a. Labor Problems. This subject deals with the historical back- 
ground and present status of labor organizations and problems. Prof. 
Smith. 

Prerequisite: A satisfactory average in 50 units in Econom- 
ies. Lee. or rec, 4 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 10 units. 

11-b. Transportation. This subject gives an account of the devel- 
opment and organization of transportation agencies'. (Formerly given 
as 26-b.) Prof. Smith. 

Prerequisite: A satisfactory average in 50 units in Eco- 
nomics. Lee. or rec., 4 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 10 units. 

12-c. Public Finance. This subject presents the theory and prac- 
tice of public expenditures and revenues together with changed tenden- 
cies and taxation reform, as well as taxation problems in the State of 
New Hampshire. (Formerly given as 30-c.) Prof. Smith. 

Prerequisite: A satisfactory average in 50 units in Eco- 
nomics. Lee. or rec, 4 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 10 units. 

13-a, 14-b. Money and Banking. A subject to set forth the prin- 
ciples and functions of money and their importance to society, together 
with a study of the various banking systems of the world with special 
emphasis on the Federal Reserve System of the United States. Mr. 
Swonger. 

125 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite: Economics 3-c. Elective for Seniors. Lee. 
or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs. ; 9 units. 

18-c. Marketing. A subject to acquaint the student with the 

importance and complications of the marketing function. Mr. Degler. 

Prerequisite: Economics 3-c. Elective for Juniors and 
Seniors. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

22-a. Corporations. This subject deals with the evolution and forms 

of business organization. Mr. Swonger. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Required of Juniors in 
Business Fundamentals. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 
hrs. ; 9 units. 

23-b. Corporation Finance. A study of the methods of financing 
corporate enterprise. (Formerly given as 54-b.) Mr. Swonger. 
Prerequisite: 22-a. Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 
Required of Juniors in Business Fundamentals. Lee or 
rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

24-c. Public Regulation of Private Business. This is a study of 
the public regulation of business organizations and their activities with 
special emphasis on methods of competition. (Formerly given as 74-a, 
75-b, 76-c.) Mr. Swonger. 

Prerequisite: 23-b. Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

Required of Juniors in Business Fundamentals. Lee or 

rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

34-a, 35-b, 36-c. History of Economics. It is the aim of this subject 
to present a critical account of the development of economic thought 
in the leading nations of the Western world; to study the economic sys- 
tems of Greece, Rome, medieval and modern Europe, including the 
manorial, guild, mercantile, kammeralistic, physiocratic, laissez faire, 
classical, historical and socialistic systems; and to indicate the important 
relations of economic philosophy to historical, political and social 
environment. Prof. Smith. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and a satisfactory average in 
50 units in Economics. Lee or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 
9 units. 

40-a, 41-b, 42-c. Seminar in Current Economic Problems. Prof. 
Smith. 

Elective for Seniors majoring in Economics who have at- 
tained a satisfactory average in the department. Rec, 2 
hrs.; prep., conf., thesis; 9 units. 

126 



ECONOMICS AND ACCOUNTING 

43-a, 44-b, 45-c. Advanced Seminar in Economic Investigation. 

Prof. Smith. 

Rec, 2 hrs.; prep., conf., thesis; 9 units. For graduate 
students only. 

57-c. Salesmanship. A subject designed to analyze the fundamen- 
tal principles of personal selling. Consideration of the personal qualifi- 
cations of the successful salesman; motives which prompt purchasing 
and the various appeals to these motives. The construction of sales 
arguments, etc. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

71-a, 72-b, 73-c. Commercial Law. This is a study of the law of 
contracts, agency, sales and negotiable instruments. Prof. Alexander. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 
6 hrs.; 9 units. 

205-b, 206-c. Traffic Management. A specialized course in the 
theory and practice of traffic management. (Not given in 1930-31.) 

ACCOUNTING 

Note: Students who have completed two or more years of 
bookkeeping in preparatory school will be permitted to 
register for Intermediate Accounting (115-a, 116-b, 
117-c) upon passing an examination covering the material 
of Elementary Accounting (112-a, 113-b, 114-c). 

Schedule the following subjects as Acct. 112-a, 113-b, etc. 

112-a, 113-b, 114-c. Elementary Accounting. A thorough study of 
the basic principles and theory of accounting. Extensive practice in 
accounting problems of the single proprietorship and partnership types 
of business organization. Prof. Hauslein. 

Required of Business Fundamentals Sophomores. Elec- 
tive for other Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Lee or 
rec, 2 hrs., lab., 4 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 10 units. 

115-a, 116-b, 117-c. Intermediate Accoimting. This subject is 
designed to follow 114-c, continuing with the work in partnerships, fol- 
lowed by a comprehensive study of corporation accounting. Extensive 
practice work in handling problems of corporation accounting. Prof. 
Johnson. 

127 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Required of Business Fundamentals Juniors. Elective for 
such other students as have completed Accounting 114-c or 
its equivalent. See note above. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; 
lab., 4 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 10 units. 

118-a, 119-b, 120-c. Advanced Accotinting. Advanced theory of 
accounting, extensive practice in solving C. P. A. problems, discussion 
of the Federal Income Tax Law and practice in computing returns. 
Prof. Johnson. 

Elective for such students as have completed Accounting 
117-c or its equivalent. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 4 hrs.; 
prep., 4 hrs.; 10 units. 

121-a, 122-b, 123-c. Cost Accounting. The relation of cost ac- 
counting to general accounting. The place of cost accounting in modern 
business. Study of various cost systems and their applications to 
particular lines of business. Careful analysis of methods of computing 
costs. Prof. Johnson. 

Elective for such students as have completed Accounting 
117-c or its equivalent. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 4 hrs.; 
prep., 4 hrs.; 10 units. 

SPECIAL COURSE IN ACCOUNTING FOR WOMEN STUDENTS 

124-a, 125-b. Household and Institutional Accounting. This sub- 
ject is designed primarily for students of Home Economics. It pre- 
supposes no previous knowledge of bookkeeping; hence the basic 
elements of accounts are first taken up, followed by their application to 
the management of households and institutions, and the principles of 
budget making. Prof. Johnson. 

Elective for Liberal Arts women students. (Not given in 
1930-1931.) 

131-a, 132-b, 133-c. Elements of Accounts. This course is open 
only to Agricultural and Technology students. Prof. Hauslein. 

Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; lyi units. 

TYPEWRITING 

1-a, 2-b, 3-c. Typewriting. A laboratory course in elementary 
typing. 

Lab., 5 hrs.; 5 units. 

128 



EDUCATION 

EDUCATION 

Justin O. Wellman, Professor 

Harlan M. Bisbee, Assistant Professor 

Naomi G. Ekdahl, Assistant Professor 

John C. Herring, Instructor 

*Paul E. Farnum, Instructor in Agricultural Education 

Major: The completion of the curriculum in profes- 
sional education as described on page 83. 

Graduate Work: For subjects primarily for graduate study 
see Catalog of the Graduate School. 

The purpose of the subjects in Education is to unite and correlate the 
forces of the college which contribute to the preparation of educational 
leaders in teaching and supervision in the secondary schools. 

The prospective teacher of agriculture, industrial arts, home economics 
or any other subject should, with the advice of the staff members of 
the department, plan his course as soon as possible. 

An average mark of 75 or more must be obtained in any ten of the 
following courses: Education 21-a, 22-b, 23-c, 31-a, 32-b, 33-c, 34-a, 
35-a, 36-b, 37-c, 38-a, 39-b, 40-c, 44-c. 

Professional Education. Students who expect to teach in New 
Hampshire secondary schools should choose one of the prescribed cur- 
ricula as outlined on page 83. The New Hampshire State Board of 
Education will accept the final examination marks in the following 
courses in lieu of the usual examinations for certificates: Education 
39-b, 40-c, 44-c, 31-a, and 32-b or 33-c. The State Board will set and 
score the final examination in Education 44-c. No credit in any of 
the above courses will be allowed by the State Board unless all of these 
courses are taken prior to Sept. 1 of the year of graduation. 

College graduates or other students with four years of post-secondary 
education will be given secondary licenses provided that their courses 
included twelve semester hours f of college work in Education. 

The majority of states require professional training which will include 
15 to 24 semester hours (60-100 time ilnits) of Education. 

INTRODUCTORY SUBJECTS 

11-a-b-c. Effective Methods of Study. The aim of this course is to 
assist the student in learning how to work at his task of getting his educa- 

* Representing the State Department of Education in the administration of the Smith- 
Hughes Act. 
1 50 time units. To convert time units into semester hours, use the ratio .24. 

129 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIR:^ 

tion in the most effective way. The general method employed in the 
course is, first, to illustrate and explain the important factors that con- 
tribute to the total efficiency of a worker, then to outline a procedure for 
the attainment of the specific habits that must be formed to achieve the 
desired results. The topics discussed include: the need for greater 
efficiency in study and in work, and an analysis of learning; conservation 
of study — restoration of energy; use of ideals in the direction of energy; 
the development and use of attention and decision; planning one's work 
and working one's plan; securing favorable conditions for work; prepar- 
ing an assignment; methods of memorization; the technique of investiga- 
tion; how to prepare for an examination and how to answer examination 
questions. Assigned readings, problems, and exercises for oral discus- 
sion. Prof. Wellman. i 

Open to Freshmen. Repeated in winter and spring terms. 
Three class meetings; prep., 3 hrs.; 6 units. 

21-a. Introduction to Education. This subject places the student 
in direct contact with general educational problems that he will meet in 
his teaching experiences. The aim of the subject is realized through 
a treatment of such problems as the money cost of education; delegating 
responsibility for carrying on schools; the school building; the present 
status of teaching; present inequalities in educational opportunities; the 
movement toward the nationalization of education. Each problem 
considered will be definitely related to the welfare of the child as the cen- 
tral objective of all educational procedure. Lectures, assigned readings 
and discussions. Mr. Herring. 

Open to all students except Freshmen. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; 

prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

22-b. History of Education. A general survey of Greek, Roman 
and European history; the Renaissance periods, an intensive study of 
modern educational movements; the evolution of the public school sys- 
tems in the United States. A large part of the time is devoted to a dis- 
cussion of the developments in American education since 1890. Mod- 
ern tendencies in the secondary field will receive consideration in con- 
nection with such movements as junior high schools, junior colleges, 
pre-vocational and vocational training, professional education, educa- 
tion of the atypical pupil. Lectures, assigned readings, reports and 
discussions. Mr. Herring. 

Prerequisite: Education 21-a. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 
7 hrs.; 10 units. 

130 



EDUCATION 

23-c. Classroom Management. This is a basal course for teachers 
and it places special emphasis on classroom organization and control 
as a problem of large importance. It presents the class as a great social 
instrument, education as a process of social adjustment, and manage- 
ment as a constructive social undertaking. It aims to furnish students 
with a compendium of principles that will furnish a foundation for the 
mastery of technique, that will interpret these principles in the light of 
accepted psychological laws, and that will unite these principles and laws 
into a coherent system. The laboratory method will be employed and 
differentiated assignments will permit each student to progress at his 
own optimum rate. Mr. Herring. 

Prerequisite: Education 22-b. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 
7 hrs.; 10 units. 

SQ-a, 30-c. Applied Psychology in Commerce and Industry. The 
purpose of this course is to assist the student in obtaining a more accurate 
and complete understanding of human nature. The elementary facts, 
laws and principles of psychology are considered with specific applica- 
tions to commercial and industrial problems and to vocational guidance. 
Lectures, assigned readings and discussions. Prof. Ekdahl. 

Required of Juniors in the Industrial Course and of 
Seniors in the Business Fundamentals Course. Open to a 
limited number of Juniors and Seniors in other courses. 
Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4>^-6 hrs.; 7>^-9 units. 

(See courses under Experimental Psychology.) • 

31-a. Psychology of Childhood. An intensive study of the develop- 
ment of the mind from childhood to adolescence. A careful interpreta- 
tion of the development of the individual's mental processes with a view 
to proper methods of education is given special attention. Lectures, 
problems, assigned readings and discussions. Prof. Ekdahl. 

Required of Seniors in Home Economics Teacher Training 
Course. Open to Juniors and Seniors, Accepted 
jointly with 33-c, and 40-c, for State Secondary Certifi- 
cate. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

32-b. Psychology of Adolescence. The purpose of this course is to 
give high school principals and teachers a deeper appreciation of the 
habitual and impulsive life of boys and girls in their teens. Topics: 
preadolescence ; the physical and mental traits of high school pupils; 
individual differences among high school pupils and their implications; 
motor training, gymnastics, athletics, play, sport, and games as they, 

131 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

function in the education of the youth; growth of social ideas; adapta- 
tion of school work to intellectual development; moral and religious 
training. Lectures, problems, assigned readings and discussions. 
Prof. Ekdahl. 

Prerequisite: Education 3 1-a. Required of Seniors in the 
Industrial and Agricultural Teacher Training courses. Ac- 
cepted jointly with 3 1-a and 40-c for a State Secondary 
Certificate. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Lee. or rec, 3 
hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

33-c. Psychology of Learning. This course considers the nature of 
learning and retention, and their neural bases; learning curves, their 
uses and significance; forms of learning; motives to learning; factors 
and conditions affecting the rate and permanency of learning; problems 
relating to learning capacity; transfer of training, and means of effecting 
beneficial transfers; applications to practical school work, and to the 
training of persons requiring special treatment. Lectures, assigned read- 
ings and discussions. Prof. Ekdahl. 

Prerequisite: Education 32-b. Open to Juniors and Sen- 
iors. Accepted jointly with 3 1-a and 40-c, for the State 
Secondary Certificate. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 
10 units. 

34-a. Applied Psychology in Vocational Education. The purpose of 
this course is to assist the student in obtaining a more accurate and 
complete understanding of human nature. The elementary facts, laws 
and principles of psychology are considered with specific applications to 
professional and vocational education problems and to vocational 
guidance. Lectures, assigned readings and discussions. Prof. Ekdahl. 

Required of Juniors in Agricultural and Industrial 
Teacher Training courses. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 
Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

35-a. Measurements and Statistics. This course deals with the 
principles, methods and application of various types of scales for measur- 
ing general mental ability and educational achievement. It includes a 
brief survey of statistical methods essential to an understanding of test- 
ing. Sufficient practice in giving tests is provided to give the student 
an appreciation of psychological methods of procedure. Prof. Ekdahl. 

Junior and Senior subject. Lee or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 
hrs. ; 10 units. 

132 



EDUCATION 

36-b. The Measurement of Achievement. This course will fur- 
nish an opportunity to study the results of education as measured by 
evidences that children are learning. Some of the topics discussed 
are: school marks; the development of standard tests; the diagnostic 
and prognostic study of tests; the interpretation of the results of achieve- 
ment tests; how to develop scales in various secondary school sub- 
jects; the effects of measurements on examinations, scholarship marks, 
methods, supervision, courses and the like. Lectures, assigned read- 
ings, problems, and discussions. Prof. Ekdahl. 

Prerequisite: Education 35-a. Open to all Juniors and 
Seniors. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

37-c. Measiirement of Aptitudes and Mental Alertness. This 
course will concern itself with the problem of analyzing various types of 
intelligence. It deals with the chief facts of normal, mental, physiologi- 
cal, and anatomical development as a basis for differentiation in class- 
room procedure. Some attention will be given to the problem of 
adjustment among super-normal and sub-normal pupils. A technique 
of the administration of group and individual tests is studied and em- 
phasis is laid upon performance tests. Lectures, assigned readings, 
problems, and discussions. Prof. Ekdahl. 

. Prerequisite: Education 36-b. Open to Juniors and Sen- 
iors. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

38-a. Secondary Education in the Junior High School. The 

evolution of the junior high school; its particular features and functions; 
the attempt to humanize the education of adolescents and advance the 
cause of democracy are some of the topics discussed. Considerable 
attention is given to the program of studies for and administration of 
junior high schools. Consideration is given in this course to extra- 
classroom activities and their articulation with classroom procedures. 
Lectures, assigned readings, problems, discussions. Prof. Wellman and 
Prof. Bisbee. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 
hrs.; 10 units. 

39-b. Secondary Education. Evolution of secondary schools, 
their articulation with elementary schools, colleges, technical institutes, 
vocations, and the home; teaching staff; curriculum; student organiza- 
tions; life guidance; aims and values of the various high school subjects; 
extra-curricular activities. Lectures, assigned readings, problems and 
discussions. Prof. Wellman and Prof. Bisbee. 

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UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Junior and Senior subject. Required of Seniors in Indus- 
trial Teacher Training. Accepted for State Secondary 
Certificate. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

40-c. Classroom Methods. A consideration of the purposes of 
high school instruction; selection and arrangement of subject matter; 
types of learning involved in high school subjects; the place of practice 
or drill ; the significance of reflective thinking and correct habit formation ; 
the art of questioning; directed study; the measurement of the results 
of teaching. Lectures, assigned readings, problems and discussions. 
Prof. Wellman and Prof. Bisbee. 

Prerequisite: Education 39-b. Accepted with 31-a and 
32-b or 33-c for a State Secondary Certificate. Junior 
and Senior subject. Required of Juniors in Agricultural 
and Seniors in Industrial and Home Economics Teacher 
Training. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

41_a-b-c. Supervised Teaching. The student participates in the 
conduct of class exercises and in the control of the class room, at first 
chiefly as an observer, but gradually entering into teacher responsibili- 
ties until complete charge of the class work is secured. Frequent con- 
ferences and discussions. The work will be under the direction of Prof. 
Bisbee. 

Prerequisites: Senior standing in Professional Education 
Course and permission of the head of the department. 
6-50 units. 

42-a. History and Principles of Vocational Education. The his- 
torical development of vocational education. The psychological and 
sociological bases of vocational education; problems, institutions, 
methods, contemporary movements and legislation; applications of 
research in relating vocations and education. Lectures, assigned read- 
ings and discussions. Prof. Wellman. 

Required of Seniors in Home Economics, Agricultural 
and Industrial Teacher Training courses. Senior subject. 
Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

43-b. Mental Hygiene. This course will consider some of the 
more important chapters in modern school hygiene: conditions that 
determine growth and development, physiological age, the physical 
and mental differences between children and adults, the general prin- 
ciples of somatic and mental hygiene, tests of ability to work and physi- 
cal condition, medical inspection, the development of habits of healthful 

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EDUCATION 

mental activity and the hygienic aspects of various school exercises. 
Lectures, assigned readings, cases and discussions. Prof. Ekdahl. 

Prerequisite: Education 31-a. Junior and Senior subject. 
Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

44-b-c. New Hampshire State Program of Studies and School Law. 
This course will consider the aims and purposes, the plan of organization 
and administration of the secondary school as outlined in the New 
Hampshire State Program of Studies. This program of studies will be 
evaluated in the light of those used in other states and students will 
have an opportunity here to become thoroughly acquainted with the 
secondary school organization in New Hampshire. Similar emphasis 
will be placed on the New Hampshire School Law. Lectures, assigned 
readings, and discussions. Prof. Bisbee. 

Senior subject. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

45-a. School Administration. A subject in the fundamental princi- 
ples of school administration intended primarily for superintendents, and 
for those who are preparing to become superintendents or supervisors, 
or directors of educational research. Topics: principles of scientific 
management applied to school administration; school records and re- 
ports; problems of school finance; judging school buildings; special 
schools; special phases of school work as health education, compulsory 
attendance; the training of school superintendents and supervisors; the 
uses of school surveys; the publicity work of a school system. Reference 
reports on special topics and discussions. Prof. Bisbee. 

Open especially to men and women with teaching experi- 
ence, or to those who have had several Education courses 
and wish to prepare themselves for supervisory positions. 
Admission by consent of the instructor. Lee. or rec, 
3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

46-b. High School Administration. The following topics will be 
covered: the legal status of the secoTidary high school; high school 
population; the problem of reorganization; the program of studies; 
vocational education and guidance in the high school; grading, measure- 
ment, classification, excess credit for quality; enrolling the student; 
social organization; community relationships; the high school library, 
staff, buildings, costs and efficiency, in general. Lectures, assigned 
readings and discussions. Prof. Bisbee. 

135 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Open especially to both men and women who wish to be- 
come principals or headmasters. Admission by consent of 
the instructor. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

47-c. Principles of Education. Selected biological, psychological, 
sociological and statistical material will be treated in such way as to 
give the student not only a survey of the fundamental principles of 
education, but also a good basis for more intensive courses in education. 
Educational theory stressing the more important principles involved 
in the process of education especially in the secondary schools. Lec- 
tures, assigned readings and discussions. Prof. Bisbee. 

Open to men and women who wish to become administra- 
tors or supervisors. Admission by consent of instructor. 
Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

48-b. Agriculture in the High School. This subject deals with 
special methods of teaching agriculture in the high school, with emphasis 
upon New Hampshire requirements as set up by the State Board of 
Education. The chief topics considered are: planning and equipping 
of classrooms and shops, selection of reference books, use and con- 
struction of charts and illustrative materials, the curriculum, the yearly 
plan of work; the presentation of materials of instruction through recita- 
tion, laboratory, field work and excursions; teaching through the home 
project, and supervised study. Mr. Farnum. 

Required of Seniors taking the Agricultural Teacher Train- 
ing Course, and open only to these students. Lee. or rec, 
3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

49-c. Supervised Teaching in Agriculture. Each senior in the 
Teacher Training Course will spend at least ten weeks as an apprentice 
teacher in some agricultural high school selected by the State Commis- 
sioner of Education and the head of the Department of Education at 
the University of New Hampshire. This work will be under the regular 
teacher of Agriculture in the high school, and will be supervised by the 
instructor in Agricultural Education at the University of New Hamp- 
shire. Mr. Farnum. 

Required of Seniors taking the Agricultural Teacher Train- 
ing Course, and open only to these students. 50 units. 

52-a. Educational Problems. (Democracy in Education and Char- 
acter Development.) This course will discuss student participation in 

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EDUCATION 

high school control; social functions, their nature, supervision, time, and 
place. The underlying principles of club work, together with a discus- 
sion of organization and administration of typical clubs of senior high 
schools, will be given careful attention. The problem of character edu- 
cation and a discussion of the moral standards in our high schools as 
revealed by investigations will furnish the student with concrete evi- 
dence in this interesting field. Lectures, assigned readings, problems, 
and problems of research. Prof. Wellman and Prof. Bisbee. 

Open to Seniors in Professional Education. Lee. or rec, 
3 hrs. ; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

53-b. Educational Problems. (Educational and Vocational Guid- 
ance.) This course endeavors to make clear the problems with which the 
school counselor, the employment manager, and the intelligent individ- 
ual himself have to deal. It discusses the beginnings of the guidance, 
pseudo-guidance, counselors' work in junior and senior high schools, 
and shows the intelligent student how he may guide himself, the methods 
of securing a position and obtaining advancement. Lectures, assigned 
readings, projects, problems, case studies with special reports. Prof. 
Wellman and Prof. Bisbee. 

Open to Seniors in Professional Education. Lee. or rec, 3 
hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

54-c. Educational Problems. (The Psychology of Management.) 
This course is designed to help those who are concerned with adminis- 
tration and supervision, whether in the teaching profession or in any 
business occupation, to establish and maintain that human efficiency 
which results from high group morale. There will be a discussion of 
teacher participation through advisory council, shop committee plans, 
and other means of promoting democracy in the field of management. 
Three tenths of the time of this course will be devoted to the considera- 
tion of the psychology of camp leadership and special lectures will be 
introduced through the cooperation of the college Y. M. C. A. and 
Y. W. C. A. The camp leadership section will be open to all students 
and will carry three time units credit." Projects, problems, topical re- 
ports and discussions. Prof. Wellman, 

Open to Seniors in Professional Education. Lee. or rec, 
3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

55-a, 56-b, 57-c. Special Problems in Educational Psychology. 
In this course an opportunity is afforded for intensive experimental and 

137 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

statistical work in Educational Psychology. Special problems may be 
carried over two or more terms. 

Open to Seniors and graduate students who have 30 units 
credit in Educational Psychology. Units to be arranged. 

CLASSROOM PROCEDURES 

The purpose of these subjects is to aid the student in obtaining a mas- 
tery of the technique of instruction in the secondary school subjects. 
The content of the high school subjects will be carefully scrutinized, 
standard texts evaluated, and visual aids manipulated. The content of 
each subject will be divided into teaching units and each student will 
plan the procedure for teaching these units to high school pupils. 
These special methods courses will be taught by expert high school 
teachers who will present the most approved devices for motivation, 
for concentric assignments, for supervision of study, and for effective 
pupil activity. 

40.4-a. The Teaching of History in Secondary Schools. Prof. 
Wellman. 

40.7-b. The Teaching of Science in Secondary Schools. Prof. 
Wellman. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing in Professional Education. 
Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Leon W. Hitchcock, Professor 
Frederick D. Jackson, Assistant Professor 
William B. Nulsen, Assistant Professor 

1-a, 2-b, 3-c. Dynamo Electric Machinery. This subject includes 
a general study of electric and magnetic quantities, direct current cir- 
cuits, magnetic circuits, direct current generators and motors, primary 
and secondary cells and batteries, electrolysis, electroplating, electro- 
typing, electrical measuring instruments, inductance, capacitance, alter- 
nating current circuits, power factor, wave form, alternators and arma- 
ture windings. Prof. Hitchcock, Prof. Jackson, Prof. Nulsen. 

Prerequisites: Physics 8-c, Mathematics 9-c, and Electri- 
cal Engineering 33-c. Required of Juniors in Electrical 
Engineering. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

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ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

4-a. Telephone and Telegraph Communication. A study of the 
acoustic and electrical principles of telephony, transmitting and receiv- 
ing apparatus; magneto and common-battery switchboards and acces- 
sories; principles of automatic telephone systems; selective party-line 
systems; overhead and underground construction; phantom, simplex, 
and composite circuits; transpositions; protection; transmission theory 
of lines. Prof. Jackson. 

Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering 3-c, 16-b, or 27-c. 
Required of Seniors in Electrical Engineering. Rec, 3 
hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; 7>^ units. 

5-b. Telephone and Radio Communication. Transmission units 
and measurements; vacuum tube repeater circuits; carrier-current sys- 
tems; radio communication, including a study of the thermionic vacuum 
tube, properties of oscillating circuits, antenna systems, radiation, 
damped and undamped wave telegraphy, radio telephony, and the 
principles of television. Prof. Jackson. 

Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering 4-a. Required of 
Seniors in Electrical Engineering. Rec, 2 hrs.; lab., l)/2 
hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 7>^ units. 

6-c. Telephone Transmission Characteristics; Radio Circuits and 
Application. Measurement of transmission losses and gains; gain- 
frequency characteristics; network balance; filters; a study of circuits 
for reception and broadcasting; tubes for the rectification of alternating 
current; a study and measurement of tube characteristics. Prof. 
Jackson. 

Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering 5-b. Elective for 
Seniors in Electrical Engineering. Rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 1^2 
hrs.; prep., dyi hrs.; 12 units. 

7-a, 8-b. Electrical Engineering Practice. This subject includes 
a detailed study of alternators, transformers, induction motors, regula- 
tors, synchronous motors, converters and rectifiers. Prof. Jackson, 
Prof. Hitchcock. 

Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 3-c. Required of 
Seniors in Electrical Engineering. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 
hrs.; 9 units, 

9-c. Transmission and Distribution Systems. A study of the 
factors affecting the design, construction and operation of transmission 
lines and distribution circuits. This includes the electrical, mechanical 

139 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

and economic calculations involved; lightning protection methods and 

apparatus; etc. Prof. Hitchcock, 

Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 8-b. Required of 
Seniors in Electrical Engineering. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 
hrs.; 9 units. 

10-b. Electric Railways. The practicability of construction from 

an economic standpoint; determination of the size, type and seating 

capacity of cars; track location and construction; train schedules; 

methods of control; train resistance; speed-time and current-time 

curves; selection of motors; the feeder system; electrolysis; power station 

and sub-station location; storage batteries; signal systems; electric track 

switches; etc. Illustrated by problems. Prof. Hitchcock. 

Required of Seniors in Electrical Engineering. Rec, 2 
hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 4 units. 

11-a, 12-b, 13-c. Electrical Laboratory. This subject includes 
the operation and testing of direct and alternating current motors and 
generators, transformers, rotary converters, rectifiers, etc. A written 
report on each experiment or test is required. Prof. Nulsen. 

Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 30-c. Required of 
Seniors in Electrical Engineering. 11-a and 12-b: lab., 5 
hrs.; prep., 5 hrs.; 10 units. 13-c: lab., 5-8 hrs.; prep., 7-4 
hrs.; 12 units. 

15-a, 16-b. Industrial Electricity. This subject consists of a 
study of the electric circuit ; the magnetic circuit ; direct current genera- 
tors and motors; elementary electrochemistry, covering storage batteries, 
refining of metals, electrotyping, and electroplating; inductance; capaci- 
tance; the alternating current circuit; alternating current generators, 
motors, starting devices, controllers, transformers, converters and recti- 
fiers. Prof. Nulsen. 

Required of Seniors in Chemical Engineering. Rec, 2 

hrs.; lab., lyi hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 7>^ units. 

19-a. Illumination Engineering. A study of the National Electrical 
Code Rules for electrical wiring and apparatus; arc and incandescent 
lamps; the principles of photometry and illumination; shades and 
reflectors; residence, ofhce, store and factory lighting; street lighting; 
fiood lighting; electric signs; illumination calculations; rates; etc Prof. 
Nulsen. 

Required of Seniors in Electrical Engineering. Rec, 

2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 5 units. 

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ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

21-c. Theory of Electrical Circuits. The application of mathematics 

to the solution of problems and in the treatment of circuits. The 

derivation of fundamental formulas and constants. 

Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering 8-b and 20-a. 
Required of Seniors in Electrical Engineering. Rec, 3 
hrs. ; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

22-a, 23-b, 24-c. Term Paper. An investigation of the history and 
development of electrical theory or equipment, or an original research 
involving electrical principles and their application. The written 
paper must conform to the rules of grammar and composition and must 
be submitted at stated intervals for criticism. Prof. Hitchcock. 

Required of Seniors in Electrical Engineering. Lab., 4 
hrs.; 4 units. 

25-a, 26-b, 27-c. Electrical Machinery. A study of the electric 
circuit; the magnetic circuit; direct current generators and motors; 
primary cells; storage batteries; inductance; capacitance; the alternating 
current circuit; alternating current generators, motors, starting devices, 
controllers, transformers, converters and rectifiers. Prof. Jackson. 

Required of Juniors in Mechanical and Industrial Engi- 
neering. Rec, 3 hrs.; lab., lyi hrs.; prep., hyi hrs.; 11 
units. 

28-a, 29-b, 30-c. Electrical Laboratory. The operation and testing 

of direct current circuits and machinery to supplement the theory 

covered in Electrical Engineering 1-a, 2-b and 3-c. Prof. Nulsen. 

Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 33-c. Required of 
Juniors in Electrical Engineering. Lab., 2>^ hrs.; prep., 
iy2 hrs.; 5 units. 

31-a, 32-b, 33-0. Introduction to Electricity. An elementary study 

of electrical circuits and machinery consisting of both calculations and 

experiments. Prof. Hitchcock, Prof. Jackson, Prof. Nulsen. 

Required of Sophomores in Electrical Engineering. 31-a: 
Lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 1 hr.; 3 units. 32-b: Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 
2 hrs.; prep., 1 hr.; 4 units. 33-c: Rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 1 hr.; 5 units. 

34-a, 35-b, 36-c. Electric Machinery. The electric circuit; the 
magnetic circuit; direct current generators and motors; primary and 
secondary cells; inductance; capacitance; the alternating current cir- 
cuit; alternating current machinery and controlling devices. Prof. 
Jackson. 

141 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Required of Juniors in Civil Engineering, Rec, 2 hrs. ; 
lab., lyi hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 1)4. units. 

37-a, 38-b, 39-c. Electrical Problems. The solution of problems 
involving both direct current and alternating current circuits and ma- 
chinery. Prof. Hitchcock. 

Required of Juniors in Electrical Engineering. Rec, 2 hrs. ; 
prep., 3 hrs.; 5 units. 

41-a, 42-b, 43-c. Student Branch of the American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers. A student organization conducted in accordance 
with the by-laws of the Institute with meetings given a place on the 
student's class schedule. Each student is required to present and 
discuss a paper on an approved subject. At times the meeting may 
take the form of a debate, an address by an outside lecturer or a motion 
picture of an instructive nature. A member of the department will 
be present at each meeting. 

Required of Juniors in Electrical Engineering, Rec, 1 
hr. ; prep., yi hr. ; 1^ units. 

44-a, 45-b 46-c. Student Branch of the American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers. Continuation of 43-c, The meetings of the 
Branch are attended by both Juniors and Seniors. 

Required of Seniors in Electrical Engineering, Rec, 1 
hr, ; prep,, ^ hr,; \]/2 units. 

100-c. Electric Circuits. Adapted primarily to students in Archi- 
tectural Construction. The calculation of wire sizes for circuits; a 
comparison of three- wire with two- wire circuits; the wiring of buildings 
for light and power; the requirements of the National Board of Fire 
Underwriters in connection with electrical installations; a study of types 
of lighting fixtures; reflectors; residence lighting; etc. Prof. Hitchcock. 

Required of Juniors in Architecture, Elective for Seniors 
in Liberal Arts and Agriculture, It is necessary to limit 
the number of students electing this subject. Approval 
of the head of the department must be secured. Rec, 2 
hrs.; lab,, I^t. hrs,; prep., 3 hrs.; 7>^ units. 

101-b. Electricity on the Farm. Arranged for and adapted to stu- 
dents in Agriculture. The subject consists of a general study of electric 
circuits; generators, motors and storage batteries, their care and opera- 
tion; simple problems in transmission; methods of wiring for electric light 
and power including a study of the National Electrical Code Rules; 

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ENGLISH 

electric bell wiring and signalling apparatus; the telephone, the general 
principles upon which it operates, and the different systems of installa- 
tion; etc. Prof. Nulsen. 

Required of Seniors in Dairy Husbandry, Poultry Hus- 
bandry and Teacher Training Course in Agriculture. Elec- 
tive for other Seniors in the College of Agriculture. Rec, 
3 hrs.; lab., 2}/2 hrs.; prep., 43^2 hrs.; 10 units. 

ENGLISH 

Alfred E. Richards, Professor 
Harold H. Scudder, Professor 
William G. Hennessy, Associate Professor 
Claude T. Lloyd, Associate Professor 
LuciNDA P. Smith, Associate Professor 
Edmund A. Cortez, Assistant Professor 
Paul S. Schoedinger, Assistant Professor 
Robert G. Webster, Instructor 
Thomas H. McGrail, Instructor 
E. Barton Hills, Instructor 
Nellie E. Pottle, Instructor 
Gertrude E. Nye, Assistant 

Major: 150 time units of departmental and related de- 
partmental subjects, exclusive of elementary subjects. 

Graduate Work: For subjects primarily for graduate study, 
see Catalog of the Graduate School. 

COMPOSITION 

1-a, 2-b, 3-c. English Composition. The chief purpose of this sub- 
ject is to give the student drill in the mechanics and conventions of Eng- 
lish composition. Stress is laid upon expository writing. At the same 
time the elementary principles of grammar, punctuation, paragraphing, 
etc., are reviewed. Prof. Richards, Mr. McGrail, Mr. Hills and Miss 
Nye. 

Required of Freshmen in the Colleges of Agriculture and 
Technology. Lee. or rec. , 3 hrs. ; prep. , 4 >^ hrs. ; 7 >^ units. 

L5-a, 2.5-b, 3.5-c. English Reading. This subject has for its chief 
aim the correlation of Freshman English with the required subjects in 
other departments of the College of Liberal Arts. It consists of exten- 
sive reading (at least seven books or their equivalent) in the fields of biog- 

143 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

raphy, fiction and history. Class drill in English grammar and composi- 
tion is based upon the subject matter of the books read. Prof. Richards, 
Prof. Scudder, Prof. Hennessy, Prof. Schoedinger, Prof. Cortez, Mr. 
Webster, Mr. Hills and Mr. McGrail. 

Required of Freshmen in the College of Liberal Arts. Lee. 
or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

4-a, 5-b, 6-c. Second Year English. This subject is a more ad- 
vanced study of the principles of good writing. The characteristics of 
exposition, description, and narration are studied. There is frequent 
theme writing illustrating these forms of composition, and the work is 
supplemented by a program of outside reading. Prof. Smith, Prof. 
Lloyd, Mr. Webster and Mr. McGrail. 

Required of Sophomores in the College of Liberal Arts. 
Lee. or rec, 1-3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; lab., 0-2 hrs.; 9 units. 
Prerequisites: English L5-a, 2. 5-b, and 3.5 — c. 

4.5-a, 5. 5-b, 6.5-c. Principles of Business Writing. (Exclusively 
for Sophomores taking the Business Fundamentals Course.) This sub- 
ject is the complement of 4-a (Second Year English) and differs from it 
only in the added emphasis it places upon the special forms of English 
writing employed in business. Drill in English grammar, collateral 
reading and discussion, and the writing of expository themes and busi- 
ness letters. Prof. Hennessy. 

Prerequisites: English L5-a, 2. 5-b, and 3.5-c. Lee. or 
rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

9-a. Daily Themes. Short papers reproducing impressions of daily 
life; class discussion and general criticism; weekly individual conferences. 
Prof. Lloyd. 

Prerequisite: English 6-c or 6.5-c. Elective for Juniors 
and Seniors. Lec.or rec, 1-3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; lab., 1-2 hrs.; 
9 units. 

10-b. Writing the Short Story. A study in the technique of writing 
short stories; criticism of representative short stories; extensive practice 
in writing. Prof. Lloyd. 

Prerequisite: English 9-a. Lee, rec, and conf., 3 hrs.; 
prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

15-a-b-c. Practice Work in Composition. This subject is required 
of any student, other than a Senior, whose work has been reported by 

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ENGLISH 

instructors as being faulty in English, and has been so judged by the 
dean of the college concerned and the head of the English Department. 
This subject does not give credit toward graduation. Prof. Smith. 

22-a, 23-b, 24-c. (See Electrical Engineering 22-a, 23-b, 24-c.) 
Mr. Webster. 

73-a. Expository Writing. Practice in the writing of reports and 
bulletins pertaining to Agriculture. Mr. Webster. 

Prerequisite: English 3-c. Required of all Seniors in the 
College of Agriculture. No others admitted except by 
special permission. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 5>^ hrs.; lyi 
units. (Formerly given as 73-a-b-c.) 

89-a, 90-b, 91-c. (See Mechanical Engineering 89-a, 90-b, 91-c.) 
Mr. Webster. 

LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE 

16-a, 17-b, 18-c. Introduction to English Literature. A general 
survey of English literature from its beginnings to the year 1900. To 
one who intends to teach English it is of fundamental importance. 
Lectures and recitations. Prof, Schoedinger. 

Elective for all classes. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 
hrs. ; 9 units. 

20-a, -b. The Literature of the Seventeenth Century. A study of 
prose and poetry (exclusive of Milton and the drama) from Bacon and 
Donne to Dryden. Prof. Lloyd. 

Elective for Juniors, Seniors, and graduate students. 
Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

20.5-a, 2L5-b. Milton. A detailed study of Milton's minor poetry 
and Paradise Lost. Consideration is also given to the social, political 
and religious history of Milton's day as reflected in his life and poetry. 
Prof. Scudder. (Not given in 1930-31.) 

20.5-a is a prerequisite for 20.5-b. 

Elective for Juniors, Seniors and graduate students. Lee. 
or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

21-c. History of the English Drama. A survey of the English drama 
from its beginnings to the closing of the theatres. Constant reading of 
the plays, with written criticisms and reports, is required. Prof. 
Scudder. 

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UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Lee. or 
rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

22-b. The English Novel in the Nineteenth Century. A study of the 
novel from Jane Austen to Thomas Hardy. There will be lectures, 
recitations, and constant outside reading. Prof. Scudder. 

Elective for Juniors, Seniors, and graduate students. Lee. 
or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 8 hrs.; 11 units. 

23-a, 24-b, 25-c. American Literature. Lectures and extensive out- 
side reading. Prof. Scudder. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Lee, or rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

26-a-b-c. Victorian Poetry. A study of English poetry from 1837 
to 1900, with special reference to the poetry of Tennyson and Browning. 
Prof. Schoedinger. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Lee or rec, 3 hrs.; 

prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

26.-5a, -b. The English Romantic Poets. A study of the poetry of 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, and of the 
causes and characteristics of the romantic movement. Prof. Lloyd. 
(Not given in 1930-1931.) 

Elective for Juniors, Seniors, and graduate students. Lee 

or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs,; 9 units. 

27-a, 28-b, 29-c. Shakespeare's Plays. A critical study of the ma- 
jor histories, comedies, and tragedies — Shakespeare, as poet and as 
dramatist. Prof. Hennessy. 

Elective for Juniors, Seniors and graduate students. Lee 

or rec, 3 hrs.; prep,, 6 hrs,; 9 units. 

31-b. An Introduction to Drama. A comprehensive survey of the 
field of drama, beginning with the drama of Greece and ending with that 
of Ibsen. Prof. Hennessy. 

Elective for Juniors, Seniors and graduate students. Lee 

or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs,; 9 units. 

32-b. The Bible as Literature. A study of various literary types 
found in the Bible. Emphasis is placed especially upon the Old Testa- 
ment in order to avoid the confusion of doctrines which enters into the 
New Testament. Biblical history is read merely as a background for the 
literature of the Bible. 

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ENGLISH 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

35-c. The English Essay. A study of selected essays from Bacon to 

Stevenson, designed to show the development of the essay as a literary 

form. Prof. Hennessy. 

Elective for Juniors, Seniors and graduate students. Lee. 
or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

37-c. John Ruskin. The reading of selected essays by Ruskin which 
bear upon the literary, artistic and social problems of the present day. 
Prof. Richards. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Lee. or 
rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

39-b. The American Novel. A survey of the novel in America from 

Charles Brockden Brown to the present time. There will be lectures 

and constant outside reading. Prof. Scudder. 

Elective for Juniors, Seniors and graduate students. Lee 
or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 8 hrs.; 11 units. 

40-c. The American Short Story. A study of the short story in 

American fiction from 1786 to the present day. Prof. Scudder. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Lee or 
rec, 3 hrs.; prep,, 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

41-a. Modern Poetry. A study of American poetry written since 

1900. Mr. Hills. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Lee or rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep,, 6 hrs,; 9 units. 

48-b. Contemporary Drama. Modern British and Continental 

drama from Ibsen to the present. Theories, types and developments. 

Prof. Hennessy. 

Elective for Juniors, Seniors and graduate students. Lee 
or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

ORAL ENGLISH 

60-a,-b, -c. Public Speaking. Theory and practice. The intellectual 
element in vocal expression with reference to phrasing, inflection and 
emphasis; technique of composition and delivery of various types of 
speeches; a general course for prospective business men, teachers, and 
candidates for the various professions dependent upon a college training. 
One section. 

147 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Rec. or 
lab., 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

61-a. Principles of Argumentation. Nature of persuasion, public 

discussion, and debate; nature of evidence; elements and analyses of 

reasoning; a study of fallacies in reasoning; refutation; briefing; limited 

classroom debates. Two sections. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Rec. or 
lab., 3 hrs.; prep. 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

62-b. Varsity Debating. Admission by try-out only. Lab., 3 hrs.; 
5-18 units. 

63-c. Advanced Public Speaking. A study of the emotional ele- 
ment with reference to utterance, quality of voice, force, time, etc. 
Intensive drill and individual practice in the technique of composition 
and delivery of various types of speeches for formal and informal oc- 
casions. Prerequisite: Eng. 60-a or its equivalent. 

Permission of the instructor must be secured before enrolling for this 

subject, and the registration is limited to sixteen members. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Lab., 3 hrs. 
prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

65-a-b-c. Play Production. This is not an elective subject. It is 
an advanced laboratory course in the actual staging and presenting of 
plays by standard authors. Members of the course are chosen by 
competitive trial test, and credit is given both for acting and for con- 
structive work in the technical phases of production. Prof. Hennessy. 
Time units 1-9. 

69-a. Dramatic Interpretation. An elementary course in the funda- 
mentals of acting and play producing. A laboratory course in which 
theory is taught through constant practice drill. Designed particularly 
for prospective teachers of English. Prof. Hennessy. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 
hrs.; 9 units. 

JOURNALISM 
76-c. News Writing. This is a course in the elements of journalism, 
and covers the preparation of news copy and the duties of the reporter. 
Special stress is laid upon newspaper publicity and the problems of the 
press agent. Prof. Scudder. 

Elective for those who have attained a grade of 75 or higher 
in English3-cor3.5-c. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep.,4>^ hrs.; 
1^2 units. 

148 



ENTOMOLOGY 

FOR SENIOR, ADVANCED AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 

84-a, 85-b, 86-c. The Teaching of High School English. The sub- 
ject is especially designed for those who major in English and are plan- 
ning to become teachers of English. It offers training in the teaching of 
oral and written composition, and in poetry, prose fiction, the essay, 
and drama. The state requirements in English are thoroughly re- 
viewed. New Hampshire and Massachusetts schools are visited and 
the teaching of English observed in those institutions. Special tutoring 
of freshmen students who are deficient in English is also a part of this 
course. A student can receive credit for two terms only. Prof. Smith. 

Prerequisites: English 6-c and Education 40-c. Elective 
for Seniors. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

85-a, 86-b, 87-c. The English Language. A study of Middle Eng- 
lish language and literature as exemplified by Chaucer's Canterbury 
Tales, followed by a study of the development of the English language 
from the time of Chaucer to the present. Open only to Seniors majoring 
in English. Prof. Richards. 

85-a is required; 86-b and 87-c are elective. Lee. or rec, 
3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Walter C. O'Kane, Professor 

Philip R. Lowry, Assistant Professor 

Major: 150 time units from the Department of Entomol- 
ogy and from related departments, especially Chemistry, 
Botany, and Zoology, exclusive of elementary subjects. 
Professional Training: The Department of Entomology 
is prepared to offer professional training in Entomology. 
For adequate training a broad foundation as well as thor- 
ough specialization is necessary. To accomplish this the 
period of training should extend beyond the regular four 
years of undergraduate college work. Students who de- 
sire to specialize in Entomology are requested to consult 
the head of the department in order to plan an adequate 
and comprehensive sequence of studies. 

1-a. Principles of Economic Entomology. The relation of the 
structure and classification of insects to methods of insect control. The 
preparation and application of insecticides, spray machinery and appli- 
ances. Prof. O'Kane and Prof. Lowry. 

Required of Sophomores in Agriculture. Elective for 
Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors in other courses. Lee, 
3 hrs.; lab., l}^ hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; 10 units. 

149 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

2-a. Insects of Orchard and Garden. The application of methods 
of insect control to typical injurious species. Studies in the life his- 
tories and habits of important insect pests of orchard, garden and cer- 
tain field crops. Adapted especially for students in Horticulture and 
in General Agriculture. Prof. O'Kane. 

Prerequisite: Entomology 1-a. Required of Juniors in 
Horticulture. Elective for other Juniors and Seniors. 
Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 2>^ hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 7>^ units. 
(Given in alternate years beginning with 1931-32.) 

3-b. Insects of Domestic Animals. The insect enemies of domestic 
livestock; the life histories, habits and means of control. Adapted 
especially for students in Animal Husbandry. Prof. O'Kane. 

Prerequisite: Entomology 1-a. Required of Seniors in 
Animal Husbandry. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 1)4 hrs.; prep., 
3 hrs.; 7>^ units. (Given in alternate years beginning 
with 1930-31.) 

4-c. Household Insects. Medical Entomology. The life histories, 
habits and means of control of insects of the household and of stored 
products. The relation of insects to disease. Adapted especially for 
students in Home Economics. Prof. O'Kane. 

Required of Seniors in Institutional Management. Elec- 
tive for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Lee, 2 hrs.; 
lab., lYi hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; lyi units. 

5-a, 6-b, 7-c. Advanced Economic Entomology. Detailed studies 
of problems involved in applied entomology. The literature of economic 
entomology. Investigational methods. Practice in arranging projects. 
Original investigations in the life history and habits of one or more 
injurious species. Adapted for advanced students. Prof. O'Kane and 
Prof. Lowry. 

Required of students specializing in Entomology. Open 
to students only by permission of head of department. 
Hours and units to be arranged. 

8-a, 9-b, 10-c. Advanced Economic Entomology. Continuation of 
Entomology 5-a, 6-b, 7-c, for students who are specializing in the sub- 
ject. Prof. O'Kane and Prof. Lowry. 

Open to students only by permission of head of depart- 
ment. Required of students specializing in Entomology. 
Hours and units to be arranged. 

150 



FORESTRY 

13-c. Forest Insects. Studies in the life histories and habits of the 
more destructive forest insects and the means of their control. Espe- 
cially adapted for students in Forestry. Prof. O'Kane. 

Prerequisite: Entomology 1-a. Required of Juniors in 
Forestry. Elective for others. Lee. , 2 hrs. ; lab. , 2 yi hrs. ; 
prep., 3 hrs.; lyi units. 

For subjects primarily for graduate students see Catalog of the Gradu- 
ate School. 

FORESTRY 

Karl W. Woodward, Professor 
Clark L. Stevens, Assistant Professor 

1-c. Principles of Forestry. This subject is intended to meet the 
needs of students who desire to obtain a general knowledge of the 
principles of forestry. The value of forests, their protection, their 
utilization, their improvement and regeneration, are discussed with 
special reference to New Hampshire conditions. Prof, Woodward. 

Required of all Freshmen in Agriculture except Forestry. 
Lee, 3 hrs.; lab., 2>^ hrs.; prep., Zyi hrs.; 9 units. 

2-c. Principles of Forestry. The same as Forestry 1-a, except that 
no laboratory work is included. Prof. Woodward. 

Elective for any student. Lee, 3 hrs. ; prep., 3 hrs. ; 6 units. 

3-a. Dendrology. This course deals with the characteristics of our 
native tree species, and with the identification of trees in the field and 
from specimens. Additional practice in identifying northern species is 
given during Summer Camp. Prof. Stevens. 

Required of Freshmen in Forestry. Elective for others, 
Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 2>^ hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; 9 units. 

4-b. Wood Identification. A study of the uses and grades of lumber, 
the physical properties and the identification of the commercially im- 
portant woods. Each student is required to provide himself with a 
hand lens. Prof. Stevens. 

Required of Freshmen in Forestry. Elective for others. 
Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., lyi hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; 9 units. 

5-a. Silvics. This course considers the effect of the environment of 
the forests: the factors which influence the growth of trees and stands. 
The field work consists of practice in measuring the intensity and dura- 

151 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

tion of the environmental factors, and of detailed as well as general 
studies of forest vegetation. A part of the field work is carried out dur- 
ing Summer Camp. Toumey's "Foundations of Silviculture" is used as 
a text. Prof. Stevens. 

Required of Juniors in Forestry. Elective for others with 
approval of the instructor. Prerequisite: Forestry 3-a. 
Lee, 2 hrs. ; lab., 5 hrs. ; prep., 3 hrs. ; 10 units. 

6-a, 24-b, 7-c. Silviculture. The art of producing and tending a 
forest. Includes seed collection, storage and testing; nursery practice; 
forest plantations; systems of natural regeneration; intermediate cut- 
tings; forest protection; and discussion of silvicultural practice in the 
most important forest regions of the United States. Each student is 
required to provide himself with a serviceable axe. Hawley's "Practice 
of Silviculture," and Toumey's "Seeding and Planting" are used as texts. 
Prof. Stevens. 

Required of Sophomores in Forestry. Elective for others 
with approval of the instructor. 6-a and 7-c: Lee, 2 hrs.; 
lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 10 units each. 24-b: Lee, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 6 hrs. ; 9 units. (Given in alternate years, commenc- 
ing with 1930-31.) 

26-a, 8-b, 9-c. Forest Mensuration. Includes practice in forest 
mapping; measurement of forest products; timber cruising; and studies 
of growth and yield of the commercial tree species of New England. 
The course is continued during Summer Camp. Each student is re- 
quired to provide himself with a box compass. Prof. Stevens. 

Required of Juniors in Forestry. Elective for others with 
approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: Forestry 3-a, 
Civil Engineering 7-a, 26-a: Lee, 1 hr.; lab., 5 hrs.; 
prep., 3 hrs.; 9 units. 8-b, 9-c: Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 5 hrs.; 
prep., 2 hrs. ; 9 units. (Given in alternate years, commenc- 
ing with 1931-32.) 

10-a, 11-b, 12-c. Forest Management. The management of wood- 
lots and large forest tracts for the purpose of gaining the largest im- 
mediate and future returns; and the preparation of working plans to 
coordinate the lumbering, protection, improvement, and regeneration of 
forests so as to make them yield the highest net returns. Prof. Wood- 
ward. 

Prerequisites: Forestry 3-a, 7-c, 9-c, 16-b, 17-c. Required 
of Seniors in Forestry. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 2^ hrs.; prep., 
3 )/2 hrs. ; 8 units. 

152 



FORESTRY 

13-b, 14-c, 15-a. Thesis. Work to be arranged according to the 
needs of individual students. Prof. Woodward and Prof. Stevens. 

Prerequisites: Forestry 3-a, 7-c, and 9-c. Required of 
Juniors and Seniors in Forestry. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 4 hrs.; 
prep., 2 hrs.; 8 units. 

16-b, 17-c. Logging and Forest Products. Methods and costs of 
logging and milling in the chief lumber-producing regions of the LJ^nited 
States; various types of forest products, their manufacture and market- 
ing, together with special problems of the lumber business. Emphasis 
is placed upon New England conditions. Attendance on instruction 
trips is required for credit in this course. Bryant's "Logging," and 
Brown's "Forest Products" used as texts. Prof. Stevens. 

Required of Juniors in Forestry. Elective for others. 
Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

18-b, 19-c. History of Forestry. The history of forestry, its de- 
velopment and present status in different countries; the work of the 
federal government and its management of the national forests; state 
forest policies; the lumber industry in the United States. Lectures and 
special readings. Prof. Woodward. 

Required of Seniors in Forestry. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 
5 hrs.; 8 units. 

20-a, 21-b. National Forest Administration. The principles and 
methods employed on the National forests. "The Use Book" is used as 
a text. Prof, Woodward. 

Prerequisites: Forestry 3-a, 7-c, and 9-c. Required of 
Seniors. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 7 units. 

22-s. Summer Camp. A six weeks' course at the Swift River Camp, 
Passaconaway, N. H. Lectures and field work on the following projects: 
A forest survey of a large area of the White Mountain National Forest; 
silvical studies of the northern forest types; fish and game on the na- 
tional forests; dendrology. There is opportunity for instruction by of- 
ficers of the U. S. Forest Service, and from three to six days are spent 
under their supervision on such work as fighting forest fires, building 
trails, telephone lines, etc. Each student is required to act as cook for a 
part of the course, and the details of running the camp and directing the 
survey are handled by the students as part of the instruction. Prof. 
Stevens. 

153 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Required of Juniors in Forestry. Prerequisites: Forestry 
9-c, 25-c, Home Economics 65-b. Lee, 3 hrs.; field and 
office work, 42 hrs.; 23 units. (Given in alternate years, 
beginning in 1930.) 

23-a. Farm Woodlot Problems. This course is intended primarily 
to cover the methods of teaching Farm Forestry in agricultural high 
schools, but may be changed to meet the needs of the individual student. 
(Given in alternate years beginning in 1931-32.) Prof. Stevens. 

Prerequisite: Forestry 1-a. Required of Seniors in 
Teacher Training. Lee, 2 hrs,; lab., lyi hrs.; prep., lyi 
hrs.; 7 units. 

25-c. Forest Improvements. Lectures on the methods of construc- 
tion and the costs of the more important structures listed as improve- 
ments of the forest. Includes roads, trails, simple bridges, logging 
railroads, telephone lines, flumes, slides, ranger cabins, lookout stations, 
etc. Prof. Stevens. 

Required of Freshmen in Forestry. Elective for others 
with approval of the instructor. Lee, 3 hrs. ; prep., 6 hrs. ; 
9 units. 



GEOLOGY 

C. Floyd Jackson, Professor 

George W. White, Assista?it Professor {In Charge) 

Theodore Ralph Meyers, Instructor 

Major: 150 time units of departmental and related depart- 
mental subjects, exclusive of elementary subjects. 

1-a, 2-b, 3-c. Elementary Geology. The study of the earth and 
its history. A consideration of the forces that have operated to produce 
land forms and structures, and a discussion of the materials of the 
earth's crust. These facts will then be applied to the interpretation of 
past geologic events, together with their effect on the development of 
life forms. Prof. White and Mr. Meyers. 

A unit course, to be started only with 1-a. Freshman 
subject. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 5 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
10 units. 

16-a. Advanced Physiography. An advanced study of land forms 
and erosion cycles, glaciation, work of the ocean, and related forces, 

154 



GEOLOGY 

together with their effects on the various physiographic provinces of 
North America. Field trips for the study of physiographic features are 
made to the White Mountains, to the New Hampshire coast, and to the 
glacial features near Durham. Prof. White. 

Prerequisite: Geology 3-c. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 
hrs.; 10 units. 

17-b. Structural and Dynamic Geology. A consideration of the 
structure of the earth's crust, metamorphism, and the forces that have 
operated to produce them. Prof. White. 

Prerequisite: Geology 3-c. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 
hrs.; 10 units. 

18-c. Historical Geology. A study of the development of the earth 
and its life, using the facts gained in the previous study of physical 
geology. Prof. WTiite. 

Prerequisites: Geology 17-b, or consent of instructor. 
Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

20-b. General Geology. A general introductory course in physical 
geology, in which the structures and materials of the earth's crust are 
discussed, together with the forces which have produced and altered 
them. Mr. Meyers. 

Required of Freshmen in Agriculture, Sophomores in 
Chemistry, and Juniors in Civil Engineering. Open to 
Liberal Arts students by permission only. Lee or rec, 
3 hrs. ; prep., 5 hrs. ; 8 units. 

30-a, 31-b, 32-c. Economic Geology. A discussion of the metals, 
their ores, and their occurrence, and consideration of the types of coal 
and their occurrence in the coal fields of the United States. A brief 
study of petroleum, the structures in which it occurs, and the distribution 
in the oil fields of the world, especially those of the United States. Lime, 
cement, building stones and related products will be treated briefly. 
Prof. White and Mr. Meyers. 

Prerequisites: Geology 18-c, or consent of the instructor. 
Lee or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. (Formerly 
given as 7-a, 8-b, 9-c) 

33-a, 34-b, 35-c. Mineralogy. A study of the minerals that make 
up the earth's crust. The first term will be devoted to a study of 

155. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

crystals, by means of models and specimens showing well defined crys- 
tals. The second term will be given to a study of minerals and their 
determination, by means of physical characteristics. The third term 
will continue the work of the second term and may take up in addition 
the aggregation of minerals to form rocks, or some work on minerals 
with the blow pipe, depending somewhat on the needs and desires of 
the class. Prof. White. 

Prerequisites: At least one year's work in Geology and 
Chemistry, or consent of the instructor. Lee. or rec, 2 
hrs. ; lab., 2 hrs. ; prep., 4 hrs. ; 8 units. 

36-a, 37-b, 38-c. Paleontology. A study of the history, develop- 
ment, and morphology of the various groups of plants and animals as 
recorded by fossils found in the rocks of the earth's crust. More atten- 
tion will be given to the development of animals than to plants. Prof. 
White and Mr. Meyers. 

Prerequisites: Zoology 3-c and Geology 3-c, or consent of 
instructor. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 
10 units. (Formerly given as 13-a. 14-b, 15-c.) (Not 
given in 1930-3 L) 

100-a. Building Stones and Clay Products. A study of the origin 
and occurrence of the various types of building stones. A consideration 
of the various types of clays, and the heavy-wares of constructional 
importance manufactured from them. Prof. White. 

Required of Sophomores in Architectural Construction. 
Lee. or rec, 1 hr.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 6 units. 

50-a, 51-b, 52-c. Geological Problems. A study of special problems, 
by means of conferences, assigned readings and field work. The work 
will be fitted to the needs of the individual students. Prof. White and 
Mr. Meyers. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Credits to be 
arranged. 



156 



HISTORY 

HISTORY 

Donald C. Babcock, Professor 
Arthur W. Jones, Assistant Professor 
Allan B, Partridge, Assistant Professor 
Philip M. Marston, Assistant Professor 
William Yale, Instructor 

Major: In conference with the head of the department, 
150 units in this and related departments, exclusive of 
elementary subjects. History 1-a, 2-b, 3-c will not be 
accepted for the major course, but students majoring in 
this department will be expected to have taken those three 
subjects in the Freshman year. 

Graduate Work: For subjects primarily for graduate work, 
see Catalog of the Graduate School. 

In the subjects in History an important place is given to historical 
reading carried on in the reference room. In some cases a considerable 
part of the work is written. 

Students electing subjects in History are referred to the introductory 
note undei; Social Science. 

The statements as to prerequisites, etc., below are for Liberal Arts 
students. Agricultural and Technology students should consult the 
head of the department. 

SUBJECTS open TO FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES 

The following three subjects constitute a basic course, required of 
students majoring in history, and recommended for all students before 
taking other history subjects. A survey of history down to 1914. 
Some supplementary material aiming at the social interpretation of 
history is included. Attention is given to important intellectual and 
social movements. 

1-a, 2-b, 3-c. Introduction to History. Prof. Babcock, Prof. Par- 
tridge, Prof. Marston, Mr. Yale. 

Elective for Freshmen and Sophomores who are taking or 
who have had Social Science parallel with it, term by term. 
Not open to Juniors and Seniors. Required of students 
majoring in History. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 
units. 

SUBJECTS NOT OPEN TO FRESHMEN 

History subjects subsequent to those designed especially for the 
freshman year are arranged in two groups, as indicated below. Sopho- 

157 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

mores taking any of these subjects must choose one or the other of the 
two groups, and follow it, if further work is done in history, through six 
term subjects. This rule takes precedence over the statements concern- 
ing eligibility and prerequisites for individual subjects. 

It is suggested, though the student is free to choose, that Group I 
should be elected by those whose major interest is in Accounting, Eco- 
nomics, Education, Home Economics, Physical Education, Political 
Science, Spanish, or Zoology. Those particularly interested in English, 
French, German, Latin, Music, Psychology, or Sociology are likely to 
find Group II more useful to them. 

It is permissible to take work in both groups at the same time. 

Students majoring in history are urged, though not compelled, to 
take 75 units in one group and 25 units in the other. 

GROUP 1 

29-a, 30-b, 31-c. The United States in the Nineteenth Century. 

The three terms cover the following periods successively: 1800 to 1830, 
1830 to 1865, 1865 to 1900. Prof. Babcock. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. Lee. or 
rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 6 hrs. ; 9 units. (Formerly 104-a, 105-b, 
106-c.) 

25-a, 26-b, 27-c, 28-a. Colonial and Revolutionary American 
History. The first two subjects take up colonial beginnings and na- 
tional rivalries. 27-c is a study of the English colonies in America. 
28-a deals with the Revolution and with our early national life up to 
1800. Prof. Babcock. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors, and for Sophomores who 
have had or are taking 29-a, 30-b, or 31-c. Lee. or rec, 
2 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 8 units. (Formerly 110-a, 111-b.) 
(25-a, 26-b, 27-c not offered in 1930-31.) 

32-b, 33-c. Recent American History. 32-b covers the period 

from 1900 to 1920. 33-c takes up the last decade intensively. Prof. 

Babcock. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors and for Sophomores who 
have had or are taking 29-a, 30-b, 31-c. Lee. or rec, 2 
hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 8 units. 

34-a, 35-b, 36-c. Latin-American History. A survey of the Iberian 
peninsula and its history as a background, the Spanish and Portuguese 
colonial epoch, the separation from Europe, the national characters. 

15& 



HISTORY 

and resources of the Latin-American states, and their relations with 
our country. Prof. Partridge. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors, and for Sophomores by 
permission. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 6 hrs. ; 9 units. 

GROUP II 

4-a. The Ancient Orient. The story of the first civilization and the 
cultural accumulations of ancient times previous to Grecian civilization. 
Prof. Partridge. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. Lee. or 
rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. (Formerly 113-a.) 
(Not offered in 1 930-3 L) 

5-b, 6-c. History of Greece. The aim is to bring home to the stu- 
dent the richness of content of Grecian civilization, and its cultural 
value for the modern world. Prof. Partridge. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. Lee. or 
rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. (Formerly 128-b.) 
(Not offered in 1930-3L) 

7-a, 8-b, 9-c. History of Rome. This year's work carries the story 
of Rome from its legendary origins and preliterary foundations to the 
death of Justinian in 565. Prof. Partridge. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. Lee. or 
rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

10-a, 11-b, 12-c. Medieval History. This survey of the pageant 
of the Middle Ages is divided by terms as follows: 10-a, from 565 to 
962; 11-b, from 962 to 1190; 12-c, from 1190 to 1320. Prof. Jones. 
(Not offered in 1930-31.) 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors, and for Sophomores by 
permission. Lee or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 
(Formerly 114-a, 130-b.) (Sec. 2 open only by permis- 
sion of instructor.) 

13-a, 14-b, 15-c. The Period of the Renaissance. The Renaissance 
as a regathering of past values and as a forward movement introducing 
the Modern Period. Prof. Jones. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors, and for Sophomores by 
permission. Lee or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

16-a, 17-b, 18-c. Modern Europe. (Not given in 1930-31.) 

159 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Elective without Regard to Groups I and II 

19-a, 20-b, 21-c, 22-a, 23-b, 24-c. History of England. The divi- 
sion by terms is as follows: 19-a, to 1066; 20-b, to 1327; 21-c, to 1558; 
22-a, to 1714; 23-b, to 1837; 24-c, since 1837. Prof. Partridge. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors, and for Sophomores by 
permission. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 
(Formerly 107-a, 108-b, 109-c.) (19-a, 20-b, 21-c, not 
offered in 1930-31.) 

19.5-a, 20.5-b, 21.5-c. Seminar. Problems in English History. 
More complete treatment of some of the problems connected with the 
development of English institutions. Prof. Partridge. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors on consultation with the 
instructor. Discussion, 2 hrs.; prep., 8 hrs.; 10 units. 

37-a, 38-b, 39-c. Recent World History. A study of the World 
War, its roots, its progress, and its outcome, and of post-war problems 
and world developments. Mr. Yale. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors on consultation with the 
instructor. Lee. or discussion, 3 hrs.; prep., 8 hrs.; 11 
units. (Formerly 136-a, 137-b, 138-c.) 

46-a, 47-b, 48-c. Seminar in Religious History. Seminar discus- 
sions centering around some of the great personalities in Christian history 
or other socio-religious movements. Prof. Babcock. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors by permission of the instruc- 
tor. Discussion, 2 hrs. ; prep., 8 hrs. ; 10 units. (Formerly 
139-a, 140-b, 141-c.) 

49-a, 50-b, 51-c. The Interpretation of History. An investigation of 

some of the ways in which thoughtful persons have viewed the historic 

process as a whole. The aim is the interpretation of life ; the method is to 

combine philosophy, sociology, and history, with emphasis on the last. 

Prof. Babcock. 

Designed especially for students majoring in History, but 
elective for Juniors and Seniors on consultation with the 
instructor. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 9 hrs.; 12 units. 

68-b. History of the Far East. An attempt to round out the usual 
historic knowledge by taking up the history of Asia outside the range of 
"western" history. Connection will be made with occidental affairs in 
recent times, however, and notice will be taken of the possible future 
significance of the Eastern culture for the West. Prof. Jones. 

160 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Prerequisite: 21 units of history for Juniors, 7 for Seniors. 
Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs. ; prep., 
7 hrs. ; 9 units. (Formerly 13 1-b.) 

64-a. History of Eastern Europe. This course takes up Russia, 
Poland, Lithuania, the Balkans, etc. — in short, the Slavic contribution 
to history. Prof. Jones. 

Prerequisite: 15 units of History for Juniors, 7 units for 
Seniors. Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Lee. or rec, 
1 hr. ; prep., 6 hrs.; 7 units. (Formerly 142-a.) 

61-a, 62-b, 63-c. Honors Course in History. Majors in this de- 
partment, with senior standing, who are of exceptional ability, and who 
are abreast of all institutional requirements for courses, groups, major 
program, etc., may be admitted. The Honors Course student will do 
all or most of his work under the supervision of the department head. 
The work will be so planned as to free him from the usual program of 
subjects, time units, class attendance, etc. Greater freedom within a 
selected field of history will be the object. Weekly meetings will take 
place with the department head and such other instructors as may be 
concerned with his work from time to time. (Formerly 150-a, 151-b, 
152-c.) 

History of Costume. See Home Economics 12-b. Students inter- 
ested in the social and cultural aspects of history are referred to this 
course as an available elective very largely historical in content. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Helen F. McLaughlin, Professor 
Irma G. Bowen, Assistant Professor 
Helen W. Leighton, Instructor 
Marion Stolworthy, Instructor 
Genevieve K, Phillips, Instructor 

Major: (a) The completion of one of the prescribed four 
year vocational courses. A grade of at least 75 must be 
made in the following subjects, arid in enough advanced 
subjects to make a total of 100 time units. Home Eco- 
nomics *l-a, 52-a, 53-b, 54-c, 84-c, 57-b, 60-c, 70-a, 
72-c, 82-a, *106-a, flOS-c, tl07-b ( J91-a and 92-b, 94-a 

* For Teacher Training and Extension Majors only. 

t For Teacher Training Majors only. 

X For Institutional Management Majors only. 

161 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

or 95-b or 96-c) Agr. § 3-c, 20-a, 21-b, 22-c *26-a, 26.5-a, 

*27-a. 

(b) General Arts Major in Home Economics (Foods, 
Clothing, Child Care and Training, Home Management). 
150 time units to be arranged with the departmental head. 
A grade of at least 75 must be made in 100 time units. 

CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 

1-a. Textiles. A study of textile materials and fibers from the 
viewpoint of the consumer. Prof. Bowen. 

Required of Home Economics Teacher Training and Ex- 
tension Training majors. Elective for other students. 
Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 4 units. 

12-b. History of Costume. A survey of the changes that have 

taken place in the development of costume with a consideration of the 

historical and social periods that have been contributing factors. Prof. 

Bowen. 

Elective for all students. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 6 hrs. ; 
9 units. 

16-a,-b,-c. Elementary Weaving. Making of hand-woven rugs. 

Mrs. Stolworthy. 

Elective for all students. Laboratory by arrangement 
with instructor. Class limited to 10 each term. 1 unit. 

19-a, -b, -c. Advanced Weaving. Plain and pattern weaving on 

hand looms. Prof. Bowen. 

Prerequisite: H. E. 16-a, or b or c. Elective for all stu- 
dents. Laboratory by arrangement with instructor. 
Class limited to 8 each term. 2-4 units. 

20-a, 21-b, 22-c. Clothing Selection. Problems in the selection 

of suitable and becoming clothing. Each term may be elected as a 

separate unit. Prof. Bowen. 

Required of Home Economics Freshmen. Elective for 
other students. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

23-b. Embroidery. The history of embroidering with attention 
given to the sources and development of good design and an analysis of 
the stitchery used in its application to various articles. Prof. Bowen. 

Elective for all students. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 
hrs.; 9 units. 

S For Extension Mcijora only. 

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HOME ECONOMICS 

25-a,-b,-c. Clothing Construction. Students registering for this 
course choose and carry out projects of special interest to the individual. 
The work is conducted by means of conferences and supervised labora- 
tory periods. Prof. Bowen. 

From 3 to 9 credit units may be elected in any one term 
depending on the projects selected. Home Economics stu- 
dents in Teacher Training or Extension will be required to 
register for not less than 3 units but may elect 24 if de- 
sired. Elective for other students. 

26-a. Millinery. A half term course in the selection and making of 

hats. Prof. Bowen. 

Required of Juniors in Teacher Training and Extension. 
Elective for other students. Lab., 4 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 
3 units. 

26.5-a. Pattern Study. A half term course in the use of patterns. 

Prof. Bowen. 

Required of Juniors in Teacher Training and Extension. 
Elective for other students. Lab., 4 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 
3 units. 

27-a. Constructive Problems. Discussion of practical ways of 

solving problems in clothing construction. Prof. Bowen. 

Required of Seniors in Teacher Training and Extension. 
Elective for other students. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 2 
hrs. ; 4 units. 

28-a. Children's Clothes. Study of the selection and making of 
children's clothes. Prof. Bowen. 

Elective for all students. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 2 
hrs.; 4 units. 

FOOD AND NUTRITION 
52-a. Food Preservation. A study of canning, preserving, pickling 
and jelly making. Mrs. Stolworthy. 

Required of Home Economics Sophomores. Elective for 
other students. Lee. or rec, 1 hr,; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 3 
hrs.; 9 units. 

53-b, 54-c. Foods and Cookery. A study of foods and their health- 
ful and economical preparation and serving. Mrs. Stolworthy. 

Required of Home Economics Sophomores. Lee or rec, 
1 hr. ; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 9 units. 

163 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

57-a. Meal Preparation. The selection of foods and their prepara- 
tion and serving in typical family meals. Prof. McLaughlin. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 54-c or 69-c. Required 
of Home Economics Seniors. Lee. or rec, 1 hr.; lab., 5 
hrs.; 6 units. 

58-b. Experimental Cookery. Comparative experimental cookery. 

Assignments in individual project work. Mrs. Stohvorthy. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 54-c. Elective for Home 
Economics Juniors and Seniors. Lab., 4 hrs. ; prep,, 2 hrs. ; 
6 units. 

60-c. Dietetics. Application of the principles of human nutrition 
to varying physiological, social and economic conditions. Prof. Mc- 
Laughlin. I 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 54-c. Required of Home 
Economics Sophomores. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 4 hrs.; 9 units. 

61-a. Nutrition. A reading course in current literature on nutrition. 
Prof. McLaughlin. 

Required of Institutional Management majors. Elective 
for other Senior Home Economics students. 1 conference 
hr.; 5 hrs. outside reading; 6 units. 

63-c. Dietetics. Special course given for women students majoring 
in Physical Education. Mrs. Stohvorthy. 

Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 6 units. 

64-a,-b,-c. Food Selection. A study of the principles of human 
nutrition. Prof. McLaughlin. 

Elective for all students not majoring in Home Economics. 
Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 5 units. 

65-b. Camp Cookery. A study of the principles of cookery as 

especially adapted to camp life. Prof. McLaughlin. 

Elective for Forestry students and majors in Physical Edu- 
cation for Women. (Given in alternate years for men or 
women — given in 1931 for men.) Lee or rec, 1 hr.; 
lab., 2 hrs.; 3 units. Class limited to 20. 

66-c. Elementary Meal Preparation. The preparing and serving 

of simple meals. Mrs. Stol worthy. 

Elective for Liberal Arts girls who have not taken Home 
Economics 67-a or 68-b. Lee or rec, 1 hr.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 1 hr.; 4 units. 

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HOME ECONOMICS 

67-a, 68-b, 69-c. Food Selection and Preparation. A general 
course in the healthful and economical selection and preparation of foods. 
Mrs. Stol worthy. 

Elective for students not majoring in Home Economics. 
Lee. or rec, 1 hr.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 9 units. 

THE FAMILY 

70-a. The Child. A survey of the present status of child study and 
of the need of the adult for an increased knowledge of the factors involved 
in child care. Prof. McLaughlin. 

Required of Home Economics Juniors. Elective for 
Liberal Arts Juniors and Seniors. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; 
prep., 2 hrs. ; 4 units. Prerequisite: knowledge of the prin- 
ciples of Psychology. 

71-a,-b,-c. Project in Child Development. Conferences and 
laboratory work with children at the Durham Kindergarten. Mrs. 
Phillips. 

Prerequisite: Education 31-a. Conference, 1 hr.; lab. 
and outside reading; 6-9 units. 

71.5-a, 71.6-b, 71.7-c. Advanced Project in Child Development 

Conferences and laboratory work with children at the Durham Kinder- 
garten. Mrs. Phillips. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 71-a, -b, -c. Conference, 
1 hr. ; lab. and outside reading; 6-9 units. 

72-c. The Family. Consideration of the effects of changing society 
upon home and family life. Prof. McLaughlin. 

Required of Home Economics Juniors. Elective for 
Liberal Arts Juniors and Seniors. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; 
prep., 4 hrs.; 6 units. 

HOME MANAGEMENT 

82a,-b,-c. Home Management. A study of the organization 

of the house as a home, and of the principles involved in its care and 

management. Prof. McLaughlin. 

Required of Home Economics Sophomores. Elective for 
other students. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

83-a. Home Care of the Sick. Emergency treatment of minor 
injuries and the care of the sick at home. Mrs. Stolworthy. 

Lee or rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 6 units. 
(Formerly given as Zoology 28-a.) 

165 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

84-c. House Furnishing. Consideration of historic, artistic, eco- 
nomic and social factors involved in the furnishing of the home. Prof. 
Bowen. 

Required of Home Economics Sophomores. Elective for 
other students. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 6 units. 

88_a,-b,-c. Home Management House. Managerial and dietetic 

problems relating to home and family life worked out by students in 

residence in the Home Management House. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 54-c, 60-c, and 82-a. 
Class limited to 12 each term. 88-c required of Home 
Economics Juniors in Teacher Training and Extension 
Courses. Elective for other Home Economics Juniors and 
Seniors. Lee. or rec. and lab.; 12 units. 

89-a, -b. Home Management House. Elementary practice in 
Home Management through 5-6 weeks' residence in the Home Manage- 
ment House. 

Elective for all Liberal Arts women students. Permission 
of department head necessary to take the course. Class 
limited to 12 each term. 6 units. 

INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT 

91-a, 92-b. Institutional Management. A study of the organiza- 
tion, equipment, and management of typical institutions and of the 
buying, planning, preparing, and serving of meals for large groups. 
Field trips to study equipment and management of institutions of 
different types are included in the course. Mrs. Leighton. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 54-a, 57-b. Required of 
Seniors in Institutional Management Course. Lee. or rec, 
2 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 6 units. 

94-a, 95-b, 96-c. Institutional Practice. Practical experience of 
different types in the kitchens and serving rooms of the University 
Commons. Mrs. Leighton. 

Prerequisite or parallel: 91-a and 92-b. Required of 
Seniors in Institutional Management Course. Lab., 8 
hrs.; prep., 1 hr.; 9 units. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

102-a. Vocational Opportunities for Home Economists. A study of 
the vocational opportunities open to women and girls. Prof. McLaugh- 
lin. 

166 



HORTICULTURE 

Required of Home Economics Freshmen. Elective for 
other students, Lee. or rec, 2 hrs. ; prep., 3 hrs. ; 5 units. 

103-a, 104-b, 105-c. Project in Home Economics. This course 
provides opportunity for the working out by the student of some project 
in home economics that supplements the work in the required courses. 
Prof. McLaughlin. 

Elective for Home Economics Juniors and Seniors. Conf., 
1 hr.; prep., 2-5-8 hrs.; 3-6-9 units. 

106-a. Home Economics Education. A consideration of the Home 
Economics Course as presented in the elementary and high school. 
Prof. McLaughlin. 

Required of Seniors in Home Economics Teacher Training 
Course. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 6 units. 

107-b. Home Economics Teaching. Supervised cadet teaching in 
selected high schools in the state. Prof. McLaughlin. 

Required of Seniors in Home Economics Teacher Training 
Course. Nine weeks or more teaching supplemented by 
conference sessions at the University. Lab., 25 hrs.; 
prep., 25 hrs.; 50 units. 

108-c. Home Economics Education. A continuation of Home 
Economics 106-a, basing discussions on the experience of students 
during the teaching of the previous term. Prof. McLaughlin. 

Required of Seniors in Home Economics Teacher Training 
Course. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 6 units. 

109-a. Demonstration Course. The organization and practical 
application of demonstration methods in the field of Home Economics. 
Home Economics Staff. 

Elective for Junior and Senior Home Economics Majors. 
Lee or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 4 units. 

HORTICULTURE 

George F. Potter, Professor 
J. Raymond Hepler, Assistant Professor 
L. Phelps Latimer, Assistant Professor 
James Macfarlane, Instructor 

1-c. Vegetable Gardening. This subject is designed to give a 
working knowledge of the various phases of commercial vegetable pro- 

167 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

duction. It includes a study of garden soils, testing and planting of 
seeds, selection of varieties with reference to conditions in the state, 
construction and management of hotbeds and cold frames, and the 
fertilization, cultivation and irrigation of the garden. Prof. Hepler. 

Required of Sophomores in Agriculture. (Given in the 
last half of the term.) Lee, 3 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 5 
hrs.; 5 units. 

2-a. Floriculture: Greenhouse Construction and Management. 
This subject treats of modern methods of greenhouse work and the more 
important plants grown under glass. Varieties, culture, marketing, 
and enemies of greenhouse plants are studied. Each student is required 
to do practical work in propagating, potting, watering plants and venti- 
lating greenhouses. A study is made of the history and development of 
different types of greenhouses, including methods of heating and general 
management. Mr. Macfarlane. 

Elective for any student. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 
3 hrs.; 7 units. 

3-c. Elementary Pomology. A brief consideration of some funda- 
mental principles of fruit growing such as location, choice of site, adapta- 
bility of soil for fruit growing, choice of varieties, soil management, 
planting of orchards, pruning, spraying and thinning. Harvesting and 
marketing are very briefly discussed. Prof. Potter. 

Required of Sophomores in Agriculture. (Given in the 
first half of the term.) Lee, 3 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 5 
hrs.; 5 units. 

4-c. Viticult\ire and Small Fruit Culture. A comprehensive study 
of the grape and small fruits, such as the strawberry, raspberry, black- 
berry, currant and gooseberry. Each fruit is studied with reference to 
its history, propagation, planting, pruning, injurious insects and diseases, 
picking and marketing. Prof. Latimer. 

Elective for any student. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 
3 hrs.; 7 units. 

5-a. Systematic Survey of Fruits and Vegetables. A study of the 
more important species of fruits and vegetables and their botanical 
relationships. Prof. Latimer and Prof. Hepler. 

Prerequisite: Bot. 1-a and Hort. 1-c, and 3-c. Required 
of Seniors in Horticulture. Lee, 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 5 
units. 

168 



HORTICULTURE 

6-b. Advanced Pomology. A detailed study of fundamental prin- 
ciples and experimental data and their application and relation to orchard 
problems such as growth and rest period in fruit plants, water require- 
ments, soil management, pruning, fruit bud formation, fruit setting, 
pollination, thinning, winter injury, and the quality and keeping period 
of fruits in storage. Prof. Latimer. 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 3-c. Required of Seniors in 
Horticulture who do not elect Horticulture 17-a. Elec- 
tive for other students. Lee, 3 hrs. ; prep., 5 hrs. ; 8 units. 

7-c. Landscape Gardening: General Principles. A study of the prin- 
ciples involved in ornamental and landscape gardening. Special atten- 
tion is given to the beautifying of home surroundings. Prof. Hepler. 

Required of Seniors in Horticulture. Elective for other 
students. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

7.5-c. Landscape Gardening : Laboratory Design. Practice in laying 

out and planting home and public grounds. Prof. Hepler. 

Recommended elective for all students taking 7-c. Re- 
quired of Seniors in Horticulture. Lab., 2 hrs.; 2 units. 

9-b. Floriculture: Conservatory and Decorative Plants. A study 
of the classification, propagation, and culture of the tropical foliage and 
flowering plants such as ferns, palms, orchids, etc., for use in the conserv- 
atory and home. Mr. Macfarlane. 

Elective for any student. Lee, 1 hr. ; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 2 
hrs.; 5 units. 

9.5-c. Floriculture: The Outdoor Flower Garden. A study of 
flowering annuals, herbaceous perennials, bulbs and bedding plants, 
with instruction in their propagation, culture and use in the beautifying 
of the home grounds. Lectures, laboratory, and field trips. Mr. Mac- 
farlane. 

Elective for any student. Lee, 1 hr.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 2 
hrs.; 5 units. 

10-b. Evolution and Improvement of Plants. The application of 
the principles of genetics to agricultural plant breeding. Hybridiza- 
tion and selection are studied as means of improving horticultural 
varieties of plants. Prof. Potter. 

Prerequisite, Zool. 32-a. Required of Juniors and Seniors 
in Horticulture. Elective for other students. Lee, 2 
hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 5 units. (Given in alternate years 
beginning 1931-32.) 

169 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

11-b. Vegetable Forcing. A subject dealing with the study of 
special vegetables as grown under glass. Emphasis is placed upon the 
commercial phases of the work, including varieties, culture, and market- 
ing. Each student is required to grow crops from seeding to maturity. 
Prof. Hepler. 

Elective for all students. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 

3 hrs.; 7 units. 

12-a, 12.5-b. Horticultural Seminar. A review of the recent 
horticultural literature and methods of investigational work. Each 
student is required to prepare and present a term paper on some horti- 
cultural topic. Prof. Potter and department staff. 

Required of Seniors in Horticulture. Other students 
must obtain permission to enter. Lee. , 2 hrs. ; prep. , 2 hrs. ; 

4 units. 

13-c. Vegetable Gardening. This subject takes up the problems of 
home and school gardening. It includes the study of methods of laying 
out and handling home, school and community gardens, choice of crops 
and varieties, their adaptation to local soil conditions, and the culture, 
displaying and judging of home garden vegetables. Prof. Hepler. 

Elective for women students. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 

prep., 2 hrs.; 6 units. 

14-a, 15-b, 16-c. Advanced Horticulture. Subject matter in any 
phase of horticulture (with laboratory practice if desirable) to meet the 
needs of special students or groups of students may be taken by arrange- 
ment with the head of the department. Prof. Potter and staff. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Students must obtain 
permission to register from the head of the department. 
Hours and units to be arranged. 

17-a. Commercial Vegetable Gardening. This subject deals with 
the management of commercial vegetable gardens. Special attention 
is given to storing, packing of vegetables for market, their display and 
judging. Prof. Hepler. 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 1-c. Elective for all students. 

Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 7 units. 

18-a. Landscape Gardening: Plant Materials. The identification 
of trees, shrubs, and herbaceous perennials as they appear in the fall 
and early winter and their use in landscape design. Prof. Hepler. 
Elective for any student. Lab., 5 hrs.; 5 units. 

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HORTICULTURE 

19-c. Elementary Beekeeping. A study of the life history and 
habits of honey bees and their adaptation to apiary conditions. The 
laboratory work includes the assembling and use of hives and hive 
fittings, and practice in handling and manipulating bees. Prof. Hepler. 

Elective for any student. Lee, 1 hr. ; lab., 2 hrs. ; prep., 
2 hrs. ; 5 units. 

20-a. Commercial Beekeeping. This subject deals with the prin- 
ciples and practices underlying the production of commercial crops of 
comb and extracted honey. The laboratory work consists of the han- 
dling of bees during the fall and winter, the extraction of honey and the 
preparation for market of extracted honey, comb honey and wax. Prof. 
Hepler, 

Elective for any student. Lee, 1 hr. ; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 
2 hrs.; 5 units. 

21-c. Supervised Horticultural Experience. Supervised work in 
orchard, garden, or greenhouses, April 1st to September 1st. Weekly 
reports are required. Prof. Potter. 

Required of all Juniors in the 3rd term of the Junior year. 
Lab., 50 units. 

Note: Students who have previously had this experience 
may substitute 50 elective units for this required subject. 

22-a. Fruit Judging. A study of the tree, fruit, leaf characters and 
commercial characteristics of the leading varieties of fruits with special 
reference to those important in New England. The student is required 
to become proficient in recognizing the varieties on sight and in judging 
exhibition fruit. Prof. Latimer. 

Elective for any student. Lab., 6 hrs. ; prep., 1 hr. ; 7 units. 

23-b. Commercial Pomology. The economic aspects of managing 
an orchard and handling of fruit crops, technicalities of fruit grading, 
agencies used and problems met in storing, transporting and merchan- 
dising the crop, with laboratory practice in actual packing house work. 
Prof. Potter. 

Prerequisite Hort. 3-c. Elective for all students. Lee, 
2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 7 units. 

For subjects primarily for graduate students, see Catalog of the 
Graduate School. 

171 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

LANGUAGES 

J. Herbert Marceau, Associate Professor 
John Stephen Walsh, Associate Professor 
Rudolf L. Hering, Assistant Professor 
Julio Berzunza, Assistant Professor 
Paul P. Grigaut, Instructor 
Frederic K. Arnold, Instructor 
John A. Floyd, Instructor 
Anna D. Murphy, Instructor 

Major: 150 time units of departmental and related de- 
partmental subjects, exclusive of elementary subjects. 

Graduate Work: For subjects primarily for graduate study, 
see Catalog of the Graduate School. ^ 

The subjects 1-a, 2-b, 3-c in French, German and Spanish constitute 
a year's subject, and must be taken in succession in the same year in 
order to complete lower division requirements. A student who fails in 
1-a, or 2-b in one of these languages should repeat the work from the 
beginning. 

Students who are preparing to teach a foreign language will elect with 
profit a second foreign language and such subjects as English Poetry and 
Drama, History and Principles of Education, History of Europe and 
Educational Sociology. 

The following subjects may be counted toward requirements in Educa- 
tion: French 13-a, 14-b, 15-c; French 22-a; German 16-a, 17-b, 18-c; 
Latin 10-a, 11-b, 12-k:, 13-a, 14-b, 15-c; Spanish 13-a, 14-b, 15-<:. 

FRENCH 

Prof. Marceau, Mr. Grigaut, Mr. Floyd and Mr. Arnold 

1-a, 2-b, 3-c. Elementary French. Elements of French grammar, 
reading of simple prose, oral practice, dictation. 
Rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 6 hrs. ; 9 units. 

4-a, 5-b, 6-c. French Prose. Reading and translation, review of 

grammar, oral practice, composition, outside reading. 

Prerequisite : French 3-c or its equivalent. Freshmen who 
offer two or more units of French for admission to college 
may take this subject. Rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 7 hrs. ; 10 units. 

7-a, 8-b, 9-c. General View of French Literature. Prose and poetry 
of some of the more important writers with lectures and outside reading. 

172 



LANGUAGES 

Prerequisite: French 6-c. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 
units. 

10-a, 11-b, 12-c. French Drama. The rise and development of the 
drama in France with reading and study of plays indicative of the vari- 
ous tendencies from Corneille to the present. 

Prerequisite: French 9-c. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 
units. 

13-a, 14-b, 15-c. French Composition and Conversation. The use 
of written and spoken French is taught by careful attention to pronuncia- 
tion; language phone records of words, sentences, and complete plays; 
composition, letter, and theme writing; memorization of songs, prose 
extracts, dialogs, poems, and short plays; stereopticon lectures; short 
talks given by individual students on assigned subjects. 

This subject is especially valuable for students who wish to teach 
French and conduct French clubs. Such students will have the oppor- 
tunity of cooperating with the instructor in the preparation and presen- 
tation of material to the class. 

This subject is for students who have shown special aptitude for 
and desire to learn French. Enrollment is limited to twenty. Permis- 
sion of the instructor is required before enrollment. 

Prerequisite: French 6-c. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 
units. 

16-a, 17-b, 18-c. Romanticism and Realism in French Literature 
of the Nineteenth Century. Prose and poetry of the more important 
writers with lectures and outside reading. 

Prerequisite: French 12-c. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 

units. 

19-a, 20-b, 21-c. Recent Tendencies in French Literature. Prose 
and poetry of the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth 
centuries. This course is open to a limited number of qualified under- 
graduates, and to graduate students. Permission of the instructor 
is required before enrollment. 

22-a. Review Course for Teachers. Review of elementary French 
grammar and practice in the presentation and arrangement of second- 
ary school work in French. This course is open only to those students 
who have completed French 9-c and who are following a teacher train- 
ing program. 

173 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

40-a, 41-b, 42-c. Lecture Course in French. On French literature, 
history, art, and civilization with quizzes, written and oral. 

Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 10 units. 

51-a, 52-b, 53-c. Honors Course in French. (This is a year course. 
It cannot be taken by terms.) The work of this subject is arranged so 
that the students may gain a knowledge as comprehensive as possible 
of French language, literature, history, and civilization. At the weekly 
conference hours the students give reports in French and all discussion 
is carried on in French. 

Permission to pursue this subject depends upon the student's record in 
subjects taken in French and in any other language or languages during 
the first three years, and on the quality of his work in general. 

Credit equal to one year's work. 

GERMAN 

Prof. Hering 

l_a, 2-b, 3-c. Elementary German. Elements of German gram- 
mar, reading of simple prose, oral practice, dictation and composition. 

Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

4-a, 5-b, 6-c. German Prose. Reading of modern prose, review of 
grammar, composition, oral practice. 

Prerequisite: German 3-c or its equivalent. Freshmen 
who offer two or more units of German for admission to 
college may take this subject. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 
10 units. 

4.5-a, 5.5-b, 6.5-c. Scientific German. Limited to students of 
Science, Chemistry, Pre- Medical, etc. 

Prerequisite: German 3-c or equivalent. Rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 5>^hrs.; 8>^ units. (Given in 1928-29 as 5-b and 
6-c.) 

7-a, 8-b, 9-c. Schiller, Modern Drama and Modem Prose. Two 

dramas of Schiller, selections from Hauptmann, Sudermann, Hof- 
mannsthal, Hart and other modern writers. 

Prerequisite: German 6-c or equivalent. Rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

174 



LANGUAGES 

10-a, 11-b, 12-c. German Literature of the Eigtheenth and Nine- 
teenth Centuries. Selections from the works of Lessing, Goethe, 
Schiller, Heine; Ballads and Lyrics. 

Prerequisite: German 6-c. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs. ; 10 
units. 

13-a, 14-b, 15-c. Contemporary German Literature. Sudermann, 
Hauptmann and other authors. 

Prerequisite: German 6-c. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 
units. 

16-a, 17-b. German Composition and Conversation. The aim 

of this subject is to train the student in writing, speaking, and under- 
standing modern German. The work includes the essentials of phonetics, 
exercises in writing German, constant practice in speaking the language; 
memorization of songs, dialogs, poems, and short plays; stereopticon 
lectures illustrating German life and institutions. 

Enrollment is limited to twenty. Permission of the instructor is 
required before enrollment. 

Prerequisite: German 6-c. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 
units. 

18-c. History of German Literattu-e. Lectures in German, assigned 
readings and quizzes. 

Lee, 3 hrs,; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

GREEK 

Prof. Walsh 

1-a, 2-b, 3-c. Elementary Greek. Grammar, composition, trans- 
lation. This course may be elected only by students who have completed 
Latin 1-a, 2-b, 3-c, and only with the consent of the instructor. 
Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

LATIN 

Prof. Walsh 

1-a. Selections from Latin poets. Translation, lectures, and study 
of Roman life and philosophy. 

Students who have offered advanced Latin for admission to college 

may take this course. 

Prerequisite: 3 or 4 years of Latin. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 
hrs.; 10 units. 

175 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

2-b, 3-c. Works of Horace, Catullus and other poets. Translation, 
lectures, and study of Latin influence on English poetry. 

Prerequisite: 1-a. Rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

4-a. Plautus. Study of ancient comedy; lectures on the literature 
and life of Rome. 

Prerequisite: Latin 3-c. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 
units. 

5-b. Terence: Andria, and Phormio. Comparison with the come- 
dies of Plautus. 

Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

6-c. Pliny's Letters. Careful study of the historical background of 
the letters. Translation, lectures. 

Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

7-a. Horace, Satires and Epistles. Translation and lectures. 
Study of Roman society as portrayed in the literature of the time. 

Prerequisite: 6-c Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 
(Not given 1930-31.) 

8-b. Martial, Epigrams. Translation and lectures. Study of Ro- 
man society as portrayed in the literature of the time. 

Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. (Not given 1930-31.) 

9-c. Cicero. Tusculan Disputations. Translation and lectures. 
Study of ancient views on philosophy, religion, and natural sciences. 

Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. (Not given in 1930- 
31.) 

10-a, 11-b, 12-c. Literature and History. This subject offers a 
comprehensive view of Latin literature of the Golden Age. 

The works of Caesar, Cicero, Virgil, and others will be studied for 
their literary value and historical content. Caesar's campaigns in Gaul 
will be studied by means of the "Commentaries," maps, stereopticon 
slides, and lectures. The history of Rome during the Golden Age will 
be studied in order to provide the background necessary to the student 
or teacher of the Classics. 

Prerequisite: Latin 3-c Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 
units. 

176 



LANGUAGES 

13-a, 14-b, 15-c. Latin Composition. Translation of English narra- 
tive, beginning with the fundamentals of grammar and progressing to a 
study of prose style and effective idiomatic expression. 

This subject may be taken in two successive years. It is open to those 
who have taken or are taking another course in college Latin and is most 
necessary for prospective teachers of Latin. 
Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

SPANISH 
Prof. Berzunza 

1-a, 2-b, 3-c. Elementary Spanish. Elements of Spanish grammar, 
reading of simple prose, oral practice, dictation. 
Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

4-a, 5-b, 6-c. Modern Spanish Prose and Poetry. Review of 

grammar, memorization, composition, oral practice. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 3-c or its equivalent. Freshmen 
who offer two or more units of Spanish for admission to 
college may take this subject. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 
10 units. 

7-a, 8-b, 9-c. The Spanish Novel. Representative novelists of the 

modern period such as Fernan Caballero, Valera, Perez Galdos, Pardo 

Bazan and Placio Valdes form the subject of study. Collateral reading, 

reports, and lectures on the history of the novel. In the Spring term, 

Cervantes will be studied. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 6-c Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 
10 units. 

10-a, 11-b, 12-c. Spanish Drama. Dramas of Lope de Vega, 

Calderon, Echegaray, the Brothers Alvarez Quintero, Benavente, and 

others. This course is carried on as far as possible in Spanish. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 9-c Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 
units. 

13-a, 14-b, 15-c. Spanish Composition and Conversation. The 

use of written and spoken Spanish is taught by careful attention to 
pronunciation; language phone records of words, sentences and complete 
plays; composition, letter, and theme writing; memorization of songs, 
prose extracts, dialogs, poems, and short plays; stereo pticon lectures; 
short talks given by individual students on assigned subjects. 

This subject is especially valuable for students who wish to teach 

177 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Spanish and conduct Spanish clubs. Such students will have opportu- 
nity to cooperate with the instructor in the preparation and presentation 
of material to the class. 

This subject is for students who have shown special aptitude for and 
desire to learn Spanish. Enrollment is limited to twenty. Permission 
of the instructor is required before enrollment. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 6-c. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 
units. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

William W. Shirley, Librarian 

Lectures on the Library followed by demonstrations of library 
methods and tools and individual problems are given to members of the 
Freshman Class during Freshman Week. 

1-b. Elementary Library Science. A general introduction to library 

methods with a brief survey of cataloging, classification, reference work, 

bibliography, book order and selection, library history and practical 

work. 

Elective. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 
7 units. (Not given in 1930-31.) 

MATHEMATICS 

Hermon L. Slobin, Professor 

Walter E. Wilbur, Assistant Professor 

Marvin R. Solt, Assistant Professor 

Edward H. Wells, Assistant Professor 

Bradford F. Kimball, Assistant Professor 

Louise S. Woodman, Assistant 

Charles A. Sewell, Assistant 

Major: 150 time units: 90 time units as follows: 1-a, 
ny2 units; 2-b, 12^^ units; 3-c, 12>^ units; 4-a, 7>^ 
units; 5-b, TjA units; 6-c, 7^ units, and 30 time units of 
Mathematics selected subject to the approval of the head 
of the Department of Mathematics, and 60 time units in 
related departments, subject to the approval of the head 
of the Department of Mathematics. Students preparing 
to teach secondary school mathematics should include 
14-b, 15-c, 16-a, 17-b and 18-c. 

1-a, 2-b, 3-c. First Year Mathematics. This constitutes a course. 
oi algebra, trigonometry and analytic geometry. 

178 



MATHEMATICS 

Prerequisite: See requirements of Mathematics for ad- 
mission to College of Technology. Rec, 5 hrs. ; prep., 7>^ 
hrs., 12>^ units. 

4-a, 5-b, 6-c. Calculus. The fundamental principles of the in- 
finitesimal calculus, differential and integral, with applications to 
geometry; introduction to sequences and series. Required of Arts 
majors in Mathematics. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 3-c. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4>^ 
hrs.; 7^ units. 

7_a, -b, 8-b, -c, 9-c. Calculus. Applications of dififerentiation and 
integration; special methods of integration; the definite integral, appli- 
cations of the definite integral to geometry, physics and mechanics; in- 
troduction to sequences and series. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 3-c. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4>^ 
hrs.; lyi units. 

10-a, 11-b, 12-c. Advanced Calculus and an Introduction to Differ- 
ential Equations. Prof. Slobin. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 9-c Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4>^ 
hrs.; lyi units. 

14-b, 15-c. The History of Mathematics. This course is designed 
especially for those preparing to teach mathematics in the high school. 
It aims to given an historical background and an appreciation of the 
development of various fields of mathematics. Prof. Wells. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1-a, 2-b, 3-c. Rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 4>^ hrs.; 1)4. units. 

16-a, 17-b, 18-c. Secondary School Mathematics and Advanced 
Algebra. A study of secondary school mathematics offered especially 
to seniors who expect to teach mathematics in the high schools. The 
state requirements in the several subjects, and topics in advanced 
algebra will be studied. Prof. Wilbur. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 1-a, 2-b, 3-c Rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 4>^ hrs.; 7>^ units. 

19-b. Solid Geometry. Elements of solid geometry. 

Prerequisites: High School Algebra and Plane Geometry. 
Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; ^Yz units. 

179 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

21-a, 22-b. Mathematics for Students of Agriculture. Elements of 
algebra, geometry and trigonometry. 

Rec, 4 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs. ; 8 units. 

25-c. Mathematics of Finance. A study of simple and compound 
interest, discount, annuities, depreciation, evaluation of securities, 
building and loan associations, and the elements of life insurance. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1-a. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 
6 units. 

101-a, 102-b, 103-c. Elementary Mathematical Analysis. This 
course is designed to prepare students for the study of statistics and 
mathematics of finance. It uses both analytical and graphical methods. 
The subjects studied are some of the fundamental functions, logarithmic 
computations, the simpler elements of least squares, etc. Emphasis is 
placed upon finding mathematical laws or formulas from empirical data. 

Prerequisites: High School Algebra and Plane Geometry. 
Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4J^ hrs.; 7>^ units. 

104-c. Mathematics of Finance. A study of simple and compound 
interest, discount, annuities, depreciation, evaluation of securities, 
building and loan associations, and the elements of life insurance. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 102-b or 1-a. Rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 4>^ hrs.; 7>^ units. 

120-c. Astronomy. A brief descriptive course. The earth as an 
astronomical body; the sun and the solar system; the constellations; 
the stars. Prof. Solt. 

Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

121-c. Astronomy. A brief descriptive course, similar to 120-c, 
but less extensive. Lectures and text. Prof. Solt. 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 2-a. Rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 
\y2 hrs.; 3>^ units. 

Note. — For Advanced Courses in Mathematics see Catalog of the 
Graduate School. 



180 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

George W. Case, Professor 

Edward L. Getchell, Associate Professor 

Thomas J. Laton, Assistant Professor 

E. T. Donovan, Assistant Professor 

E. Howard Stol worthy, Assistant Professor 

Lyman J. Batchelder, Instructor 

John C. Tonkin, Instructor 

Elias O'Connell, Instructor 

1-a. Engineering Drawing. The fundamentals of engineering 
drawing, including free-hand lettering, use of drawing instruments, 
the solution of problems in orthographic projection and a brief study of 
isometric drawing. Prof. Laton and Prof. Stolworthy. 

Required of all Freshmen in Technology. Lab., 6 hrs.; 6 
units. 

2-b, 3-c. Engineering Drawing. An application of the principles 
of descriptive geometry to the solution of problems in points, lines, 
planes and solids. Prof. Laton and Prof. Stolworthy. 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 1-a. Required of 
Freshmen in Mechanical, Electrical and Civil Engineering. 
Lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 1 hr.; 6 units. 

4-a, -c, 5-b. Machine Drawing. A further application of the princi- 
ples of orthographic projection to the drawing of machine parts. Vari- 
ous pictorial systems are studied as an aid in sketching. Problems in 
intersections and developments as applied to sheet metal work are taken 
up. Commercial drafting room methods are studied and employed in 
sketching machine parts, drawing from sketches, making of tracings and 
blueprints. Prof. Laton. 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 1-a. Required of 
Sophomores in Mechanical and Electrical Engmeermg. 
4-c required of Juniors In Industrial Engineering. Lab., 
5 hrs.; 5 units. 

7-c. Agricultural Drawing. Instruction in the subject includes 
drafting room exercises in free-hand lettering, use of drawing instru- 
ments, a brief study of orthographic and isometric projection, together 
with the drawings of plans and elevations of simple form structures. 
Prof. Stolworthy. 

181 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Required of Sophomores in Forestry. Elective for other 
Agricultural students. Lab., 5 hrs.; 5 units. 

10-a, -b. Wood Work. Instruction in the care and use of wood 
working tools and machinery, saw filing, plain cabinet making. Mr. 
Batchelder. 

For Freshmen in Technology. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 5 hrs.; 
prep., lyi hrs.; 7>^ units. 

11-b, -c. Wood Work. Cabinet making and finishing, the use of 
stain, filler, shellac, and varnish as used in cabinet finishing and interior 
wood work. Mr. Batchelder. 

Elective for Liberal Arts and Teacher Training students. 
Lab., 5 hrs.; 5 units. 

12-c. Wood Shop. Carpentry and building, including the con- 
struction of buildings, a study of the steel square and its use in the 
laying out of rafters, stair stringers, trusses, etc. Mr. Batchelder. 

Required of Seniors in Architecture. Lab., 2)4 hrs.; 
lyi units. 

13-c. Wood Shop. Instruction in the care and use of tools in farm 
carpenter shop; saw filing; the making of various implements used on 
the farm; use of steel square; laying out framing; care of lumber on the 
farm. Mr. Batchelder. 

Elective for Sophomores in Agriculture. Lab., 5 hrs.; 5 
units. 

14-b. Wood Shop. Practice teaching. Exercises, under the super- 
vision of the instructor, in teaching manual training in the wood shop. 
Mr. Batchelder. 

For Seniors in the Industrial Teacher Training Course. 
Lab., 5 hrs.; 5 units. 

15-c. Wood Work. Advanced pattern making, involving split and 

loose piece patterns, core boxes, etc. Mr. Batchelder. 

For Seniors in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. 
Lab., 5 hrs.; 5 units. 

16-a, -b. Forging. This is a study of the operations necessary in 
the forging of iron and steel, and is designed to teach the methods of 
drawing, upsetting, welding, twisting, splitting, and punching of iron; 
also the hardening, tempering, and annealing of steel, and the case hard- 
ening of mild steel as adapted to engineering work. Mr. O'Connell. 

182 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Freshmen in the College of Technology. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 
5 hrs. ; prep., 1>^ hrs. 

17-b. Forging. This is a study of the forging of iron and steel; 
and is designed to teach the operations of drawing, welding, upsetting, 
twisting, splitting, and punching of iron; the hardening, tempering 
and annealing of steel; and the case hardening of mild steel as adapted 
to agricultural work. Mr. O'Connell. 

Required of Juniors in Agricultural Teacher Training 

Course. Lab., 7>^ hrs.; 7>^ units. 

18-a. Forging, Advanced work in forging, welding, tempering, case 

hardening, tool dressing. Mr. O'Connell. 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 16. For Seniors in 
Industrial Teacher Training Course. Lab., 5 hrs. ; 5 units. 

20-a, 21-b. Machine Work. Exercises in bench work. Chipping, 

filing, and scraping, and the laying out of work from drawings. Practice 

in operating machine tools and simple lathe work. Mr. Tonkin. 

Required of Mechanical, Electrical and Industrial En- 
gineering Sophomores. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 
lyi hrs.; 1}4 units. 

24-a, 25-b. Machine Work. Advanced work on the lathe, milling 
machine, planers, shaper, and grinding machines, and the manufacture 
of some machine, using more advanced methods and special tools. Mr. 
Tonkin. 

For Seniors in Industrial Teacher Training Course. Lab. 
5 hrs.; 5 units. 

26-a, -b, -c. Machine Work. Advanced machine work, time study 
production methods, and shop management. Mr. Tonkin. 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 25-b. Lab., 5 hrs.; 
5 units. 

30-b. Machine Work. An elementary study of the operation of the 
principal machines and tools suited to the chemist's needs. Mr. Tonkin. 
Required of Freshmen in Chemical Engineering. Lab., 5 
hrs.; 5 units. 

35-a. Farm Shop. Forge and machine shop work in the repair of gas 
engines and the equipment of modern farm buildings, and the making, 
tempering and repair of farm tools. 

Limited to Agricultural Teacher Training Juniors. Rec, 
1 hr.; prep., 1 hr.; lab., 5 hrs.; 7 units. 

183 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

36-c. Farm Shop. Design of farm buildings, the identification and 
selection of lumber, and the use and care of carpenter tools. 

Limited to Agricultural Teacher Training Juniors. Rec, 
1 hr. ; prep., 1 hr.; lab., 5 hrs.; 7 units. 

40-a, 41-b, 42-c. Mechanical Laboratory. This subject will give 
the student instruction in the elements of power plant work, operation of 
machines for testing materials, general survey of laboratory work and 
method of conducting tests. In the spring term a study is made of 
various methods of admitting steam to reciprocating engines. Design 
of plain slide valve and riding cut-off valve by means of Bilgram and 
Zeuner diagrams. Setting of valves; governors; reversing gears for 
locomotives and design of Corliss valve. Prof. Getchell. 

Required of Sophomores in Mechanical Engineering. 
Lab., 4 hrs.; 4 units. 

43-a, 44-b, 45-c. Mechanics. A study of forces and moment of 
forces; determination of stresses in trusses and cranes: centroids and 
center of gravity; rectilinear and curvilinear motion; translation and 
rotation of bodies; work, power and energy. The application of the 
principles of Mechanics to the determination of stress and strain in 
rigid bodies. Thin walled cylinders; riveted joints; torsion; transverse 
loading of beams; deflection in beams of all kinds; study of columns and 
compound stresses. Prof. Getchell. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8-b. Required of Juniors 
in Mechanical, Electrical and Civil Engineering. Rec, 
3 hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; lyi units. 

46-a, 47-b, 48-c. Mechanics. Forces; composition and resolution 

of forces, center of gravity; stresses in cranes framed and structures; 

moment of inertia of areas and solids; motion of translation and rotation; 

work, power and energy; strength of materials; riveted joints; sheer and 

moment diagrams; study of beams of all kinds as regards strength and 

deflection; torsion and columns. Prof. Getchell. 

Required of Juniors in Industrial and Chemical Engineer- 
ing. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; 1]^ units. 

49-a, 50-b, 51-c. Mechanics. Principles of Mechanics as applied 
to architectural work. Winter and spring laboratories to consist of the 
testing of cement and strength of materials. Study of methods of 
obtaining strongest and densest mixtures for concrete and making of 
specimens for later testing. Testing of steels in tension; column tests; 

184 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

shear tests; transverse tests on wooden and concrete beams, etc. Prof. 

Getchell. 

Required of all Junior Architects, Rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 2>^ 
hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 1)4. units. 

52-a. Testing Materials Laboratory. Testing of cements and con- 
crete aggregates. Study of methods of obtaining strongest and densest 
mixtures for concrete and making of specimens for later testing. Prof. 
Getchell. 

Required of all Junior Civil Engineers. Lab., lyi hrs.; 
iy2 units. 

53-c. Testing Materials Laboratory. Tension, torsion and sheer 
tests of steel; compression tests; transverse tests of wooden and concrete 
beams; column tests. Prof. Getchell. 

Required of Junior Mechanical, Electrical and Civil Engi- 
neers. Lab., 5 hrs.; 5 units. 

54-a. Manufacture of Iron and SteeL Study of the location of ores 
and other raw materials entering into the manufacture of pig iron, 
of the blast furnace and conversion of pig iron into wrought iron, Bes- 
semer and open hearth steels and of the manufacture of steel by electrical 
methods. Heat treatment of steel to produce the various degrees of 
hardness, strength and ductility. Prof. Getchell. 

Required of Senior Mechanical and Industrial Engineers. 
Rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 5 units. 

55-a. Heat Treatment Laboratory. Study of the effects of various 

heat treatments on different grades of steel. Testing of the above under 

different conditions. Microscopic identification of steels, etc. Prof. 

Getchell. 

Required of Senior Mechanical Engineers. Lab., 5 hrs.; 
5 units. 

56-c. Kinematics. A study of motion in machine construction ; belts 

and other flexible connectors; gears and gear teeth; wheels in trains; 

epicyclic trains; cams; instantaneous centers; linkwork, velocity and 

acceleration diagrams. Prof. Laton. 

Required of Sophomore Mechanical and Electrical Engi- 
neers. Rec, 1 hr. ; lab., 5 hrs. ; prep., 1 hr. ; 7 units. 

58-a, 59-b, 60-c. Machine Design. The application of the principle 
of Mechanics to the design of machine elements. This work to be taken 

185 



X 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

up with the idea of manufacturing the parts in the most economical 
manner in the shops. General principles of design will be followed rather 
than attempting to develop any particular system of procedure. Prof. 
Laton. 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 45-c. Required of 
Senior Mechanical Engineers. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 5 hrs. ; 
prep., 1>2 hrs,; 7>^ units. 

61-a, 62-b, 63-c. Heat Power Engineering. A general study of 
power generation adaptable to the needs of Civil Engineers. This 
subject will involve only enough fundamental theory to enable the 
students to grasp a working knowledge of such power mechanism as they 
may use after graduation. Prof. Donovan. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 8-b and Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 45-c. Required of Civil Engineering Seniors. Rec, 
1 hr.; lab., lyi hrs.; prep., 1^ hrs.; 5 units. 

64-a, 65-b. Thermodynamics. A study of the fundamental laws of 
thermodynamics and their relation to the operation of mechanisms using 
gases and vapors as their working substances. Prof. Donovan. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8-b. Required of Junior Me- 
chanical, Industrial and Electrical Engineers. Rec, 3 
hrs.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; lyi units. 

65.5-c. Thermodynamics. A further study of the laws of ther- 
modynamics, and their engineering application. Prof. Donovan. 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 65-b. Required of 
Junior Mechanical Engineers. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4>^ 
hrs.; lyi units. 

66-b, 67-c. Thermodynamics. The laws of gases and vapors and 
their application to power plant apparatus. Prof. Donovan. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8-b. Required of Senior 
Chemical Engineers. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4K hrs.; lyi. 
units. 

68-a, 69-b. Mechanical Laboratory. A study of the apparatus and 
methods for testing power plant operation and equipment. Prof. Dono- 
van. 

Prerequisite: Enrollment in Mechanical Engineering 
65-b in winter term. Required of Junior Electrical 
Engineers. Lab., 5 hrs. ; 5 units. 

186 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

68.5-a, 69.5-b. Mechanical Laboratory. Methods of investigating 
operation and testing of power plant equipment. Prof. Donovan. 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 42 -c, and en- 
rollment in 65-b in winter term. Required of Junior 
Mechanical Engineers. Lab., 5 hrs.; 5 units. 

70-a, 71-b. Mechanical Laboratory. Testing of steam and gas 

power plant equipment. Prof. Donovan. 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 65-b. Required 
of Senior Industrial Engineers. Lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 
2>^hrs.; 7>^ units. 

72-b. Mechanical Laboratory. Testing of steam and gas engines in 

accordance with A. S. M. E. power test codes. Prof. Donovan. 

Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering 65-b and 69-b. 
Required of Senior Mechanical Engineers. Lab., 5 hrs; 
prep., lyi hrs.; 7>^ units. 

73-c. Mechanical Laboratory. Testing of steam and gas power 
equipment. Prof. Donovan. 

Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering 71-b or 72-b. 
Required of Senior Mechanical and Industrial Engineers.^ j^^ > 

74-a, 75-b. Power Plants. A study of the steam generating power 

plant dealing with its equipment and costs. Prof. Donovan. 

Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering 65-b or 67-c. Re- 
quired of Senior Mechanical, Electrical and Industrial 
Engineers. Rec. , 2 hrs. ; prep. , 3 hrs. ; 5 units-. 

75.5-c. Power Plants. A continuation of Power Plants 75-b. 
Professor Donovan. 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 75-b. Required , 
of Senior Mechanical, Electrical and Industrial Engineers. 
Lab., 5 hrs.; 5 units. 

76-a, 77-b, 78-c. Automotive Engineering. A study of the general 
construction and operation of motor vehicles, particularly the engine. 
Prof. Stolworthy. 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engifieering 45-c and 65.5-c. 

Required of Senior Mechanical Engineers. Rec, 2 hrs.; 

lab., 2}4 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 7>^ units. 

79_b, _c. Heating and Ventilating. A study of the heat losses of 
buildings, and the design of heating and ventilating systems for resi- 
dences, factories, etc. Prof. Stolworthy. 

187 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Required of Seniors in Mechanical Engineering and Archi- 
tectural Construction. Rec, 1 hr. ; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 1>^ 
hrs.; l]/2 units. 

82-a, 83-b, 84-c, 85-a, 86-b, 87-c. Student Branch of American 
Society of Mechanical Engineering. An organization of Junior and 
Senior students in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering. The 
subject consists of preparation and presentation of addresses on mechan- 
ical engineering topics by members and in which the instructor present 
criticises the work from the point of view of delivery, subject matter and 
terms used. 

Required of Juniors and Seniors in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. Rec, 1 hr. ; prep., >^ hr. ; Xyi units. 

89-a, 90-b, 91-c. Thesis. The thesis embodies research or com- 
mercial investigation. Equal emphasis is placed upon composition and 
accuracy in subject matter. 

Required of Senior Mechanical and Industrial Engineers. 
Rec. 1 hr. ; prep., 4 hrs.; 5 units. 

100-s, 101-c, 102-s, 103-s. Cooperative Work. Industrial Engi- 
neering students spend four terms amounting approximately to one 
year in the employ of industrial concerns of the State of New Hampshire, 
under the general supervision of a member of the Faculty. They re- 
ceive the prevailing rates of pay for this employment. Reports on the 
work they have done are required to be submitted early in the term 
following the period of employment. 

Required of Freshman, Sophomore and Junior Industrial 
Engineers. 

104-b. Personnel Administration. A study of the history, develop- 
ments and methods of solution of the problems connected with the 
human side of production management. Prof. Case. 

Required of Senior Mechanical and Industrial and Junior 
Civil Engineers. Rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., ^yi hrs. ; 7^ units. 

105-a, 106-b, 107-c. Industrial Problems. Typical problem of pro- 
duction in which the Shops of the College are used as a manufacturing 
unit. This problem will include all steps of manufacture from the shop 
drawings to the final assembling and testing. Prof. Laton and Assistants. 

Required of Senior Industrial Engineers. Lab., 5 hrs.; 5 
units. 

188 



METEOROLOGY 

108-c. Industrial Problems. Plant and sales organization and 

study of market for article manufactured during the junior year. Prof. 

Case. 

Required of Senior Industrial Engineers. Rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep., ^^2 hrs.; 1]/2 units. 

109-a. Industrial Management. This subject deals in a broad way 

with the principles of personnel organization for manufacture, time and 

motion studies, planning and production control methods, plant location 

and arrangement and other similar problems in the field of management. 

Prof. Case. 

Required of Senior Mechanical and Junior Industrial 
Engineers and elective for Seniors in Business Funda- 
mentals. Rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 4>^ hrs. ; 1^4 units. 

110-b, 111-c. Industrial Management. A continuation of 109-a, in 
which the various topics are studied in greater detail and from a more 
technical point of view. Prof. Case. 

Required of Junior Industrial Engineers and not elective 
for other students. Rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 4>^ hrs. ; 1}4 units. 

112-a. Materials Handling. Modern methods of conveying and 
storing gases, liquids and solids. Prof. Case. 

Prerequisite: C. E. 44-c. Required of Senior Mechanical 
and Industrial Engineers. Rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 4>^ hrs. ; 7^ 
units. 

METEOROLOGY 

Charles H. Pettee, Professor 
Harry M. Rugg, Instructor 

1-a. Meteorology. Recitations and lectures on wind systems, pre- 
cipitation, humidity, laws of storms and tornadoes, and methods of 
prediction of atmospheric changes. Mr. Rugg. 

Prerequisite: Physics. Required of Juniors in Forestry 
and those Juniors in Civil Engineering who do not enroll in 
Mil. Sci. 24-a. Elective for others. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 
4>^ hrs.; 1^4 units. 



189 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

Major Hugo E. Pitz, Coast Artillery Corps, Professor 
Captain James H. Day, Infantry, Assistant Professor 
Captain Norman P. Williams, Infantry, Assistant Professor 
First Lieutenant George B. Anderson, Coast Artillery Corps, As- 
sistant Professor 
First Lieutenant James F. McGraw, Infantry, Assistant Professor 
Sergeant Fred W. Wood, Coast Artillery Corps, Assistant 
Sergeant Fred H. Brown, Infantry, Assistant 

Military training is carried on concurrently with the academic work 
in order that the college man may be prepared for service in time of 
national emergency as well as for the pursuit of his business or profession. 

Two courses in Military Science are offered, one in Coast (heavy) 
Artillery, and one in Infantry, each leading to a commission in the 
Officers' Reserve Corps of the United States. Each course, which 
covers four years, is divided into the basic course, covering the first two 
years, and the advanced course, covering the succeeding two years. 
The basic course is required of all male Freshmen and Sophomores who 
are physically fit. The advanced course is elective for those who have 
completed the basic course. 

Exemptions or permission to be absent cannot be accorded to fresh- 
men or sophomores; and any student who is absent from any part of 
the instruction will be required subsequently to make up the omitted 
training or its equivalent before being credited with the number of units 
necessary for graduation. 

Students enrolled in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Agriculture will 
be assigned to the Infantry Course, and students enrolled in the College 
of Technology will be assigned to the Coast Artillery Course. Both 
courses include the fundamentals of military training, the object of 
which is the development of those qualities which make for success in 
either civil or military life, as good health and an erect carriage, courtesy 
and agreeable manners, enthusiasm, honor, aggressiveness and leader- 
ship. In addition, each course pays particular attention to the special 
material and methods used in that arm. 

The Coast Artillery Course covers the principles of the construction, 
and the use and care of the large caliber guns used in the coast defenses, 
and in the railroad and mobile artillery. The manning of these weapons 
requires a detailed knowledge of guns and their carriages, the forces 
involved in their firing, motor transportation, advanced surveying, gun- 

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MILITARY SCIENCE 

nery, and artillery tactics. All heavy artillery material embodies the 
most advanced scientific principles and the most up-to-date practice In 
electrical, mechanical and chemical engineering. To the engineering 
student this course ofifers, in addition to military training, an excellent 
opportunity to observe practical applications of his classroom work and 
to enlarge his view of the engineering field. The War Department 
furnishes the necessary guns, tractors, motor vehicles and accessories to 
insure ample opportunity for practical work. 

The Infantry Course includes the following subjects: Command and 
Leadership; Scouting and Patrolling; Musketry; Map Reading and 
Sketching; Military Law; Military History; the Combat Principles of 
the various organizations composing the war strength infantry battalion ; 
and, in addition, a study of the infantry weapons: the caliber .30 service 
rifle, the .45 caliber automatic pistol; the Browning automatic rifle; 
the Browning machine gun; the 37-millimeter gun and the 3-inch 
mortar. Physics, chemistry, history, mathematics and psychology have 
many practical applications In the Infantry Course. 

Equipment furnished by the War Department includes machine guns, 
howitzer weapons, automatic rifles, service rifles, sketching cases, and 
field equipment. The entire R. O. T. C. Is armed with the 1903 (Spring- 
field) caliber ,30 rifle, the same rifle used by the U. S. Army. 

The Reserve Officers Training Corps 

Physically fit male students who take military training may enroll In 
the Reserve Officers Training Corps. Enrollments are for two years in 
either the Basic or the Advanced Course. Members of the Corps are 
loaned* all uniforms and equipment necessary In the training. This 
will include: 

1 U. S. Rifle, Cal. 30 1 Breeches, wool, O. D. 1 Cap, overseas 

2 Collar Ornaments 1 Shirt, wool, O. D. 1 Belt 

1 Coat, wool, O. D. 1 Pair Leggings 2 R. O. T. C. insignia 

Advanced Course. — The students who are selected for the Advanced 
Course and who devote the prescribed time to this course, and attend 
such summer training camps as may be prescribed by the Secretary of 

* A deposit of $15 is required of each student having military equipment in his pos- 
session, whether registered for Military Science or not. At the end of the academic 
year or upon a student's severing his connection with the college, this deposit will be 
refunded to him upon the satisfactory return to the University of all military property 
loaned except that a reasonable deduction will be made to cover any damage beyond 
natural wear and tear or for the loss of any of the equipment. 

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UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

War, are allowed during their junior and senior years commutation of 
subsistence at such rate as the Secretary of War may prescribe. During 
the academic year of 1929-30 this was 30 cents per day, totalling about 
$178 for the two years. In addition, members of the Advanced Course 
are paid at the same rate of pay as privates of the Regular Army, while 
in actual attendance at the summer training camp. 

Membership in the Corps does not require the student to enter into 
any agreement to continue in college a definite length of time, nor does 
it bind him to any military service. He is as much at liberty to leave 
college as though he were not a member. He is required, once having 
entered upon the course, to complete it as a requisite toward graduation 
in any college maintaining a unit of the Corps, and to observe the rules 
and regulations prescribed for the government of the Corps. 

Commissions. — Each year upon the completion of the Advanced 
Course, all qualified students are tendered commissions in the Officers' 
Reserve Corps. 

Summer Camps. — The requirement of members of the advanced 
course to attend the summer training camps is prescribed from time to 
time by the Secretary of War. These camps are organized by bringing 
together members of the R. O. T. C. from several colleges. The training 
taken at college is elaborated upon and special attention is paid to the 
practical side of it. The student is furnished transportation to and 
from the camp and is given an additional clothing allowance, so that his 
only expenses are for laundry and such other personal expenditures 
as he may care to make. Excellent food is provided. Moral conditions 
are carefully controlled by the regular army officers in charge. The 
health and hygiene of the students are under direct supervision of medi- 
cal officers and medical attendance is provided for those requiring it 
while at camp. Athletic contests are a feature of the camp and inter- 
collegiate athletics between members of the different units is encouraged. 
The student agrees to observe the rules of the camp and to give his best 
efforts to the course of training. Thus he is offered at no expense an 
exceptional opportunity for physical and mental development. 

Each spring the University allots two entire days to the Military 
Department at which time the units engage in tactical exercises, cere- 
monies and competitive drills. 

Organization. — The unit is organized into a regiment consisting of 
one battalion, three companies, of infantry and one battalion, three 
batteries, of Coast Artillery. Student officers, selected from the senior 

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MILITARY SCIENCE 

class by the Professor of Military Science and Tactics, with the approval 
of the President, are designated for field, staff and company officers 
not later than the opening of the spring term. 

MILITARY SCIENCE COURSE 

First Year Basic, Infantry 

1-a. Command and Leadership. Physical drill; military courtesy; 
individual, squad, platoon and company close and extended order drill. 
Students perform the duties of privates in the infantry battalion for 
drills, ceremonies and field problems. Lectures and practical work. 

No prerequisites. Required of Freshmen. Rec, 2 hrs.; 
drill, 2 hrs.; prep., 1 hr.; 5 units. 

2-b. Rifie Marksmanship. Theoretical and practical instruction in 
all the phases of rifle marksmanship, including sighting and aiming, 
positions, trigger squeeze, rapid fire, use of scorebook, nomenclature and 
care of the rifle; gallery practice. 

Military Hygiene and First Aid. Lectures and practical instruction 
in personal and troop hygiene. Demonstration of and practical instruc- 
tion in emergency treatment of wounds and injuries. 

Required of Freshmen. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 5 units. 

3-c. Command and Leadership. A continuation of 1-a. 

Required of Freshmen. Rec, 2 hrs.; drill, 2 hrs.; prep., 
1 hr. ; 5 units. 

Second Year Basic, Infantry 

4-a. Scouting and Patrolling. Individual scouting: use of cover, 
crossing of obstacles, map reading, operation of compass, messages. 
The duties of platoon scouts. Observation and sniping posts. The 
conduct of day and night patrols. Map and terrain problems. 

Command and Leadership. Squad, platoon and company close and 
extended order drill. Students perform the duties of corporals in the 
infantry battalion for drills, ceremonies and field problems. 
Rec, 2 hrs. ; drill, 2 hrs. ; prep., 1 hr. ; 5 units. 

5-b. Infantry Weapons (Automatic Rifle). Nomenclature and op- 
eration of the Browning automatic rifle; marksmanship; tactical uses 
of the weapon. 

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UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Combat Principles. Theoretical and practical instruction in the 
conduct of a rifle squad in the field. Practical instruction on varied 
ground with a view to training the student to lead a squad in attack 
and defense and on security missions. 

Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 5 units. 

6-c. Musketry. Includes: range estimation, target designation, 
the eff'ect of fire, fire discipline, and fire control. Lectures; map and 
terrain problems. 

Infantry "Weapons (Automatic Rifie). Firing on the 1000-inch range. 

Command and Leadership. A continuation of 4-a. 
Rec, 2 hrs.; drill, 2 hrs.; prep., 1 hr.; 5 units. 

First Year Advanced, Infantry. 

7-a. Military Sketching. Practical work in sketching and map 
reading. 

37-millimeter Gun and 3-inch Trench Mortar. Instruction covers 
determination of fire data, means of fire control, fire orders, field strip- 
ping, and assembling, going into action and out of action. 

Command and Leadership. Theoretical and practical instruction in 
the duties of officers and non-commissioned officers of infantry. Stu- 
dents act as sergeants for drills, ceremonies and field problems. 

Prerequisites: 1-a, 2-b, 3-c, 4-a, 5-b, 6-c. Rec., 3 hrs.; 
drill, 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 8 units. 

8-b. Combat Principles. Tactical principles; estimate of the situa- 
tion; field orders; tactics of the rifle squad and the rifle section. 

Infantry Weapons (Machine Guns). The nomenclature and opera- 
tion of the caliber .30 Browning machine gun; marksmanship; direct and 
indirect laying; preparation of battery charts. 

Rec, 5 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 8 units. 
9-c. Command and Leadership. A continuation of 7-a. 

Infantry Weapons. Gun drill; range firing with the Browning ma- 
chine gun on the 1000-inch range. 

Rec, 3 hrs.; drill, 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 8 units. 

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MILITARY SCIENCE 

Second Year Advanced, Infantry 

10-a. Combat Principles. Tactics of the rifle platoon, company and 
battalion; functioning of the battalion staff; map and terrain problems. 

Command and Leadership. Students perform the duties of officers in 
the cadet regiment. Theoretical and practical instruction in platoon, 
company and battalion drill, and ceremonies. 

Prerequisites: First Year Advanced. Rec, 3 hrs. ; drill, 
2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 8 units. 

11-b. Military History. Lectures, and study of American military 
history and policy from the Revolution to the World War; study of the 
National Defense Act of 1920. 

Administration. Lectures and problems covering the administration 
of a rifle company. 

Military Law. Lectures on the American system of military law: 
summary, special and general courtsmartial ; preparation of charges; 
the articles of war. 

Military Field Engineering. Problems in the intrenching of the 
rifle squad, section, platoon, and company; the building of obstacles. 

Rec, 5 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 8 units. 

12-c. Combat Principles. Field problems involving the rifle com- 
pany and the infantry battalion. 

Command and Leadership. Continuation of 10-a. 
Rec, 3 hrs.; drill, 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 8 units. 

First Year Basic, Coast Artillery 

18-a. Drill and Command. Military courtesy and discipline. The 
National Defense Act and the R. O. T. C. 

Rec, 2 hrs.; drill, 2 hrs.; prep., 1 lir.; 5 units. 

19-b. Instruction in 2nd Class Gunners' Work for C. A. C. Am- 
munition, cordage, telephones, service of the piece, nomenclature, care 
and adjustment of the 75 mm. anti-aircraft guns, and rifle marksmanship. 
Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 5 units. 

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UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

20-c. Service of the Piece, Nomenclature, Care and Adjustment of 
the 155-mm. Gun. Drill and command. Ceremonies for the battalion 
and regiment. Military hygiene and first aid. 

Rec, 2 hrs.; drill, 2 hrs.; prep., 1 hr.; 5 units. 

Second Year Basic, Coast Artillery 

21-a. Fire Control Instruments. Range section duties for seacoast, 
mobile, and anti-aircraft artillery. Drill and command. 

Rec, 2 hrs.; drill, 2 hrs.; prep., 1 hr.; 5 units. 

22-b. Range Section Duties. Indication and identification of tar- 
gets (war ships and aircraft.) 

Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 5 units. 

23-c. Drill and Command. Each student is given opportunity to 
drill the platoon . Ceremonies. Aiming and laying of guns and mortars. 
Definitions, Coast Artillery. 

Rec, 2 hrs.; drill, 2 hrs.; prep., 1 hr.; 5 units. 

First Year Advanced, Coast Artillery 

24-a. Drill and Command. Map Reading. Military sketching, 
Orientation. Position finding systems (to include heavy artillery and 
anti-aircraft artillery). 

Elective for Juniors. Rec, 3 hrs.; drill, 2 hrs.; prep., 3 
hrs.; 8 units. 

25-b. Position Finding Systems. Gunnery, Heavy and Anti-aircraft 
artillery. Conduct of fire. Analysis of drill and target practice. 

Elective for Juniors. Rec, 5 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 8 units. 

26-c. Drill and Command. Gunnery, Anti-aircraft artillery, con- 
tinued. Analysis of drill and target practice. 

Elective for Juniors. Rec, 3 hrs.; drill, 2 hrs.; prep., 3 
hrs.; 8 units. 

Second Year Advanced, Coast Artillery 

27-a. Artillery Material. To acquaint the student with those types 
of artillery material not covered in previous years, and to round out the 
information gained at camp. 

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MUSIC 

Orientation. To enable the student to perform the topographical 
operations necessary for accurate computation of firing data in the field 
and in seacoast firing. 

Drill and Command. To qualify the student to perform the duties 
of platoon and company commanders and to be instructors of basic 
students in close order drill, physical drill and ceremonies; especial 
attention being paid to the development of leadership qualities and 
methods of instructing and handling men. 

Rec, 3 hrs.; drill, 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 8 units. 

28-b. Military Law and Officers' Reserve Corps Regulations. Mili- 
tary history and policy; administration and supply; military field 
engineering. 

Rec, 5 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 8 units. 

29-c. Military Motor Transportation. Artillery tactics; drill and 
command. 

Rec, 3 hrs.; drill, 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 8 units. 

MUSIC 

Robert W. Manton, Director and Associate Professor 
Frances E. De Wolfe, Instructor in Voice 
Harris S. Shaw, Instructor in Pianoforte and Organ 
Lewis Swain, Bandmaster 

Major: 150 time units of departmental and related depart- 
mental subjects, i.e., Language (French and German, 
important to musical literature). History (History of 
the Fine Arts), English Literature, and Physics (Acous- 
tics), exclusive of elementary subjects. 

The courses offered by the department for a major are of two kinds: 
L Courses which are technical and grammatical in nature and are 
meant to provide a thorough training for students intending to follow 
the musical profession as teachers and c?)mposers. These are Music 
107-a, 108-b, 109-c, 110-a, 111-b, 112-c, 113-a, 114-b, 115-c, 116-a, 
117-b, 118-c, 119-a, 120-b, 121-c. 

2. Courses which treat of the historical, literary and aesthetic side 
of music and are meant for those who wish to acquire a broad apprecia- 
tion of the art and to familiarize themselves with the standard works of 

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UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

musical literature. These courses are Music 101-a, 102-b, 103-c, 104-a, 
105-b, 106-c, 125-a, 126-b, 127-c. 

3. The third group of courses is practical in nature and embraces 
the educational activities of the University Glee Clubs, Band, Orchestra 
and Choir. 

It is recommended that students consult the head of the department 
as early in their freshman year as possible relative to the best disposition 
of order of courses in the major. 

Students who intend to take only one course in Music, for the culti- 
vation of musical taste and general knowledge, are recommended to elect 
either Music 101-a, 102-b, 103-c, Music 104-a, 105-b, 106-c or 125-a, 
126-b, 127-c as best adapted to this end. 

Students interested in some particular musical organization, such as 
glee club or orchestra, are permitted to elect work with the organization 
desired. 

1. University Band 

Prerequisite: Ability to play some band instrument and 
satisfactory completion of Basic Course, R. O. T. C. Open 
to others with special permission of the Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics. 5 units. 

2. The Men's Glee Club 

Open to all undergraduates interested in choral singing 
and who fulfill the requirements of a try-out. 1 unit. 

3. Advanced Choral Club (Men) 

Prerequisite: A grade of 80, or more, in the previous course. 
Participation in some extra-curricular work, i.e., Double 
Quartet, Choir, Vesper Services, and the like. 2-4 units. 

4. The Women's Glee Club 

Open to all undergraduates interested in choral singing and 
who fulfill the requirements of a try-out. 1 unit. 

5. Advanced Choral Club (Women) 

Prerequisite: A grade of 80, or more, in the previous 
course. Participation in some extra-curricular activity, i.e.. 
Treble Clef Club, Choir, Vesper Services, and the like. 
2-4 units. 

6. The University Orchestra 

Open to all undergraduates interested in orchestral playing 
and who fulfill the requirements of a try-out. 1 unit. 

7. Advanced Orchestral Club 

Prerequisite: A grade of 80, or more, in the previous course; 
ability to assist at Vesper Services, exceptional solo tech- 
nique. Departmental class illustrations, string quartet, 
trio playing and the like. 2-4 units. 

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MUSIC 

8. The University Choir 

Open to all students who fulfill the requirements of a 
try-out. 

The purpose of this organization is to supply the music 
each Sunday at the Community Church. Faithfulness 
and dependability, together with pronounced musical 
ability, are necessary qualifications for each member. 
The usual opportunities will be given to study and par- 
ticipate in the finest examples of Church music in existence, 
thereby giving a distinctive educational and cultural value 
in this splendid field of music. 

2 rehearsals: 2 units. 

Note: In all these activities the educational values will be 
strongly stressed, the principles of ensemble, solo work, 
tone production, diction and above all sound musician- 
ship, will be studied and concerts prepared separately and 
in combination to enhance and vitalize the university life. 
They may also be called upon to illustrate as the occasion 
arises the historical and cultural courses of the depart- 
ment. Attendance at rehearsals will be in accordance 
with the rule covering class work. 

101-a, 102-b, 103-c. The Evolution of Music and General History 
from the Earliest Times to the Present Day. This is a literary course 
and instruction is given in the form of lectures. The beginnings of 
music, Greek and Roman music, the early church, systems of notations, 
beginnings of harmony and counterpoint, the Troubadours and Minne- 
singers, the Motet and Madrigal, Folk Song, the 17th, 18th, 19th and 
20th century composers, music in America, modern tendencies, are some 
of the topics treated together with many other phases. This course 
is open to Freshmen and others and presupposes knowledge of the fun- 
damental principles of music. Prof. Manton, 

Elective. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs. ; prep., 2 hrs. ; 4 units. 

104-a, 105-b, 106-c. The Appreciation of Music. This course will 
begin with a study of the elements of music such as: rhythm, melody, 
harmony, constructive formulae and the musical forms employed in 
composition, for upon the recognition of these depends the approach to 
intelligent appreciation. Comprehensive illustrations of the great 
musical literature, will be played and jointly analyzed by the instruc- 
tor and students from the point of view of the listener. This course 
is open and especially recommended to all students who wish to become 
familiar with the art of music in its many phases, and gain a wider 
acquaintance with the masterpieces. Prof. Manton. 

Elective. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs. ; prep., 2 hrs. ; 4 units. 

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UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

107-a, 108-b, 109-c. Harmony, The Grammar of Music. The 
fundamental principles of the craft of music are embodied in the study 
of harmony. This course treats of the different chords in their natural 
and combined relations, triads, seventh and ninth chords with their 
inversions and resolutions; cadences, chromatically altered chords, aug- 
mented chords, suspensions; passing and auxiliary notes, modulation, 
melody writing, pedal point, etc. 

The work consists of exercises on bases and harmonization of given 
melodies, dictation, etc. This course is open and especially recom- 
mended to Freshmen and others, and ability to play some instrument 
will facilitate an understanding of this course. Prof. Manton. 
Elective. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs. ; prep., 3 hrs. ; 5 units. 

1 10-a, 1 1 1-b, 1 12-c. Advanced Harmony and Analysis. This course 
is intended to supplement 107-a — 109-c and to lay stress on the many 
significant innovations found in modern harmony, a thorough study of 
modal harmony and its relation to composition and appreciation of 
fifteenth- and sixteenth-century music; and to give the student a thor- 
ough grounding in preparation for contrapuntal writing. Prof. Manton. 

Prerequisite: Music 107-a — 109-c. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; 
prep., 3 hrs. ; 5 units. 

113-a, 114-b, 115-c. Counterpoint and Composition. Counterpoint 
is the combining of several melodic voices, a horizontal conception of 
writing and is essential to all fijiished craftsmanship. The work will 
treat of the various orders of counterpoint, the treatment of cantus 
firmus in different voices, double counterpoint, choral figuration, etc. 

The work in composition will include thorough training in detail 

relating to sentence formation, two- and three-part forms, inventions, 

dance forms and the various rondo forms up to sonata form. Prof. 

Manton. 

Prerequisite: Music 107-a — 112-c. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; 
prep., 3 hrs,; 5 units. 

116-a, 117-b, 118-c. Canon and Fugue. Canon and Fugue are the 
most advanced forms of polyphonic composition requiring a thorough 
grounding in harmony and counterpoint. The object of this course is to 
perfect the contrapuntal technique of the student, enabling him to study 
the larger and freer forms of composition. The work will be based on 
the fugal works of Bach and Franck, consisting of practice in writing 
canons of all species, and in the analysis and composition of fugues. 
Prof. Manton. 

200 



MUSIC 

Prerequisite: 107-a — 115-c. Lee. or rec., 2 hrs. ; prep., 3 
hrs.; 5 units. 

119-a, 120-b, 121-c. Instrumentation. This course is designed 
to ground the student in the idiomatic writing and technique necessary 
to score effectively for symphonic orchestra. It necessitates an authori- 
tative background in harmony and counterpoint. All the orchestral and 
incidental instruments will be considered individually as to their tech- 
nique, possibilities and limitations; in separate choirs; and in combina- 
tion as a whole unit. 

Orchestral scores will be studied in detail; score reading and reduction 
emphasized ; and original work in this idiom encouraged. Prof. Manton. 

Prerequisite: 104-a — 115-c. 3 hrs.; 7 units. 

125-a, 126-b, 127-c. The History and Development of Choral 
Music. This is a special course consisting of lectures, readings and re- 
ports, and only a limited number of qualified students will be admitted. 

The course is designed to trace a straight line through such study as: 
Gregorian Chant, folk song, the music of the Troubadours, the begin- 
nings of harmony and counterpoint, the work of the Netherland masters 
and of Palestrina and his contemporaries; the German choral works of 
the Reformation, the Tudor School in England; the choral works of 
Bach, Handel, etc., ending with a consideration of the choral literature 
of the nineteenth century and the modern French, English and Russian 
composers. 

Students will meet three times a week, the third meeting being devoted 
to class singing of the works considered in the lectures. Prof. Manton. 
5 hrs.; 5 units. 
Note: No fee is attached to courses 101-a inclusive. 

128-a. Public School Music, Sight Singing, etc. This course deals 
with that part of the theory of music which is absolutely necessary for 
those who may be called upon to take charge of school singing in con- 
nection with their teaching in public schools. It consists of a study of 
the major and minor scales, keys, the measurement of intervals, teaching 
of rhythms, the technique of time beating and conducting, etc. 
Elective. Lee. or rec, 1 hr.; prep., 1 hr.; 2 units. 

PIANOFORTE 

22-a, 23-b, 24-c. Elementary Course. This course consists of a 
correct knowledge of such fundamentals as: notation, nomenclature, 

201 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

rhythm, elementary pedaling and technique, principles of phrasing, 
touches, stress, etc. This is supplemented by studies and simple com- 
positions embodying the above elements and will be adapted to the 
needs of the individual student. 
Elective. 1 lesson. 

25-a, 26-b, 27-c. Intermediate Course. This course consists of 
the development and strengthening of 22-a — 24-c, together with the 
fundamentals of freedom and relaxation, rotary and lateral move- 
ments, hand adjustments, principles of style, tonal production, uneven 
rhythms, embellishments, etc. Adapted to the needs of the individual 
student and supplemented by interesting and vital pianoforte literature. 

Prerequisite: Piano 22-a — 24-c or the equivalent. 1 les- 
son. 

28-a, 29-b, 30-c. Advanced Playing, Interpretation, etc. This 
course presupposes the two previous courses and gives the student a 
grounding in the higher and more subtle phases of piano playing such 
as are necessary for finished .execution. Advanced technique, bravura 
playing, individual interpretation, finished hand adjustment and abso- 
lute tonal command together with work on musical form and pianistic 
evolution as applied to recreation will dominate this course. Adapted 
to the individual needs and supplemented by the master works of 
pianoforte literature. 

Prerequisite: Piano 22-a — 27-c. 1 lesson. 
Note: 22-a — 30-c inclusive are fee courses. 

VOICE 

31-a, 32-b, 33-c. Elementary Course. This course consists of a 
correct knowledge of such fundamentals as: breath control, resonance, 
flexibility of voice, attack, enunciation and articulation. It also con- 
sists of a practical knowledge of sight singing which enables the student 
to read and understand his music as fast as the voice acquires the ability 
to perform the same, supplemented by the correct singing of the simpler 
form of song or ballad. 

Elective. 1 lesson. 

34-a, 35-b, 36-c. Intermediate Course. This course consists of 
the development of the fundamentals of voice placing such as: breath 
control, resonance, etc., together with a progressive step in reading 
made by singing through the different keys. This is supplemented by 

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MUSIC 

songs and ballads of medium difficulty, church music, quartet work. 
Emphasis is placed on dramatic values from the singer's standpoint. 

Prerequisite: Voice 31-a — 33-c or the equivalent. 1 
lesson. 

37-a, 38-b, 39-c. Advanced Course. This course presupposes the 
two previous ones; furthers the fundamentals of voice placing, aids 
in the mastery of all modes, intervals and musical phrases; develops 
the voice and acquires control of it for finished execution. This is 
supplemented by a study of the oratorio, opera, and the master works 
of song. 

Prerequisite: Voice 31-a — 36-c. 1 lesson. 
Note: 31-a — 39-c are fee courses. 

ORGAN 

40-a, 41-b, 42-c. Elementary Course. Manual and pedal technique. 
Short pieces presenting the fundamentals of registration, use of swells, 
etc. 

Prerequisite: Piano 22-a — 24-c or the equivalent. 1 
lesson. 

43-a, 44-b, 45-c. Intermediate Course. The smaller preludes and 
fugues of Bach; easier works of the modern French masters. 

Prerequisite: Organ 40-a — 42-c. 1 lesson. 

46-a, 47-b, 48-c. Advanced Course. Master organ works of Bach; 
preludes, toccatas and fugues, choral preludes; master works of Cesar 
Franck, Widor, Vierne and the English and American schools together 
with a study of adaption, modulation, accompaniment, Gregorian 
chant, mediaeval or modal harmony, conducting, hymnology, etc.; in 
relation to practical church service work. 

Prerequisite: Organ 40-a — 45-c. 1 lesson. 
Note: 40-a — 48-c inclusive are fee courses. 

TUITION , 

Private instruction in piano, 50 minute lesson a week, $36 a term. 
Private instruction in organ, 50 minute lesson a week, $36 a term. 
All tuition is payable at the Business Office at the time of registration. 



203 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Herbert F. Rudd, Professor 

Adolph G. Ekdahl, Associate Professor 

Major: 150 time units in this and related departments, 
exclusive of elementary subjects. 

Graduate Work: For subjects primarily for graduate study 
see Catalog of Graduate School. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Prof. Rudd 

24-a, 25-b5 26-c. Introduction to Philosophy. This is a survey of 
some of the main problems of philosophy. First term: a study of the 
problems of personality and the factors that determine its development. 
Second term: an analysis of the modern sciences and their bearing on the 
persistent problems of philosophy. Third term: an inquiry into modern 
problems, and the ethical principles required for their solution. 
(Formerly given as 24-a, 25-b, 31-a, and 32-b.) 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. Lee. or 
rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs. ; 10 units. 

31-a, 32-b, 33-c. History of Philosophy. A history of philosophic 
thinking from ancient Greece up to and including a study of the critical 
and constructive thinking of contemporary philosophers. (Formerly 
given as 41-a, and 42-b.) 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 
7 hrs.; 10 units. 

41-a. The Art of Thinking : Logic. A study of the methods, criteria 

and processes involved in the search for truth. (Formerly given as 

34-a.) 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 
7 hrs.; 10 units. 

42-b. Oriental Philosophy. An introduction to the great thinkers 
of the East. (Formerly given as 43-c.) 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Lee or rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 
7 hrs.; 10 units. 

43-c. Applied Ethics. A study of the application of ethical theory 
to contemporary social, economic and political problems. (Formerly 
given as 33-c.) 

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PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors who have taken 24-a, 
25-b, 26-c, or who secure the consent of the instructor. 
Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs. ; 10 units. 

44-c. Literary Contributions to Philosophy. A study of philosophic 
tendencies as revealed in selected literary material. Extensive readings 
and reports form the basis of discussion. (Not given in 1930-31.) 

Elective for Seniors who have taken a year's work in 
Philosophy and who possess a general acquaintance with 
literature. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 7 hrs. ; 10 units. 

54-a, 55-b, 56-c. Seminar: Special Problems in Philosophy. 

Elective with consent of instructor for Seniors who have 
taken two years' work in Philosophy. Credit to be 
arranged. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Prof. Ekdahl 

Graduate Work: For subjects primarily for graduate study 
see Catalog of Graduate School. 

The main purpose of the subjects in general psychology is to give 
to the student wishing a well-rounded education an opportunity for 
gaining a knowledge of the human mind and the bases of human be- 
havior. The sequence of courses is arranged so as to lay also a suitable 
foundation for those who might desire to enter graduate work in psy- 
chology or to become psychologists by profession. 

INITIAL SUBJECTS 

21-a. Elementary Psychology. This course together with 22-b 
covers the general field of psychology and consists of lectures, recitations 
and class demonstrations. A study of the sensations, feeling, atten- 
tion, reflexes, instincts and emotions. 

Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

22-b. Elementary Psychology. A continuation of 21-a. A study 
of perception, judgment, imagination, association, memory, learning 
and reasoning. 

Lee or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

SECONDARY SUBJECTS 

Prerequisites: Psychology 21-a and 22-b, unless other- 
wise specified or permission is granted by instructor. 

205 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

23-c. Advanced Psychology. A brief historical survey of the field 
of theoretical psychology. Psychological concepts and theories as 
developed by the various modern "schools" of psychology such as 
Functionalism, Behaviorism and Structuralism are considered. 
Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

37-a. Experimental Psychology. Simple experiments on the sensa- 
tions. Emphasis will be given toward the development of the proper 
technique of psychological investigation. 

Lee. and lab. , 6 hrs. ; prep. , 4 hrs. ; 10 units. 

38-b. Experimental Psychology. Experiments on the complex 
mental processes involving perception, association, imagination, learn- 
ing and reasoning. 

Lee. or lab., 6 hrs. ; prep., 4 hrs. ; 10 units. 

39-c. Experimental Psychology. Psychophysical measurements, 
the determination of Weber constants, limens of sensibility, etc. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 21 -a and 22-b may be waived 
for seniors and pre-medical Sophomores in the following 
courses. Lee. and lab. , 6 hrs. ; prep. , 4 hrs. ; 10 units. 

47-a. Physiological Psychology. A study of the physical basis of 
mind, nerve functions and their correlations with mental processes. 

Lee. or rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 7 hrs. ; 10 units. 

48-b. Comparative Psychology. A study of psycho-genesis or the 
development of "mind" beginning with the one-celled organisms. 

Lee. or rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 7 hrs. ; 10 units. 

49-c. Abnormal Psychology. A study of abnormal phenomena such 
as disorders of perception, association, memory, judgment and per- 
sonality. The psychoses and psychoneuroses will be considered and 
a brief review of mental deficiency presented. Visits to institutions. 

Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 7 hrs.; 10 units. 

51-a, 52-b, 53-c. Seminar. Special Problems in Psychology. 
Credit to be arranged. 



206 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN 

William H. Cowell, Professor, Director of Athletics and Coach of Foot- 
hall 

Henry C. Swasey, Associate Professor, Coach of Baseball, Soccer, 
Basketball 

Paul C. Sweet, Assistant Professor, Coach of Track, Cross- Country, 
Relay and Wintry Sports 

E. W. Christensen, Instructor, Assistant Coach Varsity Football, Coach 
of Hockey 

Carl Lundholm, Instructor, Supervisor and Coach Freshman Football, 
Basketball and Baseball 

Percy F. Reed, Assistant, Coach of Boxing 

Alfred H. Miller, Assistant, Assistant Coach Football, Relay and Track 

Charles O. Nason, Department Secretary 

William F. Marsh, Trainer 

Aims — 1. To promote regulated exercise, and to provide an incen- 
tive and opportunity for every student to receive physical recreation. 

2. To secure good posture, a uniform development and a reasonable 
amount of bodily skill and grace. 

3. To stimulate the habit of exercise. 

Equipment. — The Gymnasium affords accommodation for training 
and indoor games. 

On the ground floor are the lockers and various shower baths. 

On the first floor are offices and the main gymnasium hall. 

On the i^second floor are the offices of the athletic director and 
assistants. 

The Memorial Field adjoins the Gymnasium. The field, one of the 
best in New England, is equipped with a one-fourth mile cinder track, a 
fine sodded grass football gridiron, and adequate stands for the large 
crowds attending New Hampshire activities. Adjoining Memorial Field 
a beautiful pond has been constructed for swimming, skating, hockey, 
and water sports. 

Three minutes' walk from the Gymnasium is^the new baseball field 
and other fields under construction. 

On these fields are found practice grounds for football, soccer, class 
contests, as well as the regulation baseball diamond. 

Requirements. — All men students in the freshman and sophomore 
classes are required to complete the prescribed work in Physical Educa- 
tion. 

207 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

The gymnasium suit adopted by the department consists of a gray 
cotton sleeveless jersey, gray flannel trunks with blue trimming on leg 
seams, blue athletic stockings and rubber-soled tennis or basketball 
shoes. This suit must be worn at all class exercises in Physical Edu- 
cation. 

The minimum requirement of each term's work calls for participation 
in some form of approved physical exercise for at least two periods 
weekly for 9 weeks. 

Students may elect any scheduled activity desired, either as a mem- 
ber of an organized athletic squad or as a member of regular sections 
of an approved activity which has the greatest appeal for the individual 
concerned. 

The activities which are offered at various times of the year are 
baseball, basketball, boxing, cross countr^^ football, hockey, skating, 
skiing, snowshoeing, swimming, tennis, track, volleyball, in-door base- 
ball and handball. 

{Consult ^'Subject and Room Schedule" for Schedule of Approved Ac- 
tivities.) 

51-a. Physical Education. The program for the term consists of 
numerous seasonal activities. Students may elect activity desired. 
For students physically unfit, corrective gym work will be prescribed. 

Required of all Freshmen. Work, 2 hrs.; 2 units. 

52-b. Physical Education. Continuation of recreational activity 
program. 

Required of all Freshmen. Work, 2 hrs.; 2 units. 

53-c. Physical Education. Continuation of recreational activity 
program. 

Required of all Freshmen. Work, 2 hrs. ; 2 units. 

54-a. Physical Education. Term's program consists of numerous 
seasonal activities. Students may elect activity desired. For students 
physically unfit, corrective gym work will be prescribed. 

Required of all Sophomores. Work, 2 hrs.; 2 units. 

55-b. Physical Education. Continuation of recreational activity 
program. 

Required of all Sophomores. Work, 2 hrs.; 2 units, 

208 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

56-c. Physical Education. Continuation of recreational activity 
program. 

Required of all Sophomores. Work, 2 hrs.; 2 units. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

Katharine Watson, Director 
Bertha M. Kirk, Assistant Professor 
Marion Russell, Instructor 

Major: See page 84. 

Students registering in the Professional Physical Education Course 
after September 1, 1929, must obtain a grade of 75 in at least 100 time 
units from the following list of required subjects: 

Physical Education 14-a, 15-b, 16-c, 17-b, 18-a, -b, 19-c, 20-a, 21-b, 
22-c, 23-a, 24-b, 25-c, 26-a, 27-b, 28-c, 29-a, 30-b, 31-c, 32-a, 33-b, 
34-c, 35-a, 36-b, 37-c, 38-c, Chemistry 14-b, 15-c, Zoology 33-a, 34-b, 
35-c, 13-a, 14-b, 15-c, 42-a, 43-b, 44-c, Agric. Chem, 1-a, 23-b, Home 
Economics 63-c, 83-a. 

The aim of this department is to give to each woman student an 
opportunity to enter into activities of a wholesome, stimulating and en- 
joyable nature, which will enable her to reach her utmost of social, 
physical, and mental perfection. 

Requirements: Every woman student must take at least one subject 
of practical work each term of her Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior 
years. 

Every woman student must, upon entering, have a physical exami- 
nation by the University Physician. The results of this examination 
determine the type of activity each may pursue. 

Except in special cases, no more than four units In the same sport 
shall be credited. 

Required costume. — White step-in blouse, black knickers, black stock- 
ings, and high or low black tennis shoes. This costume may be pur- 
chased at Wright & Ditson's, Boston, Mass. 

PRACTICAL SUBJECTS 
Fall term. — Hockey, Soccer, Tennis, Volley-ball, Swimming, Horse- 
back riding. Individual Gymnastics, Archery, Natural Gymnastics, Clog 
Dancing, Natural Dancing, Riflery and BowHng. 

Winter term. — Basketball, Clog Dancing, Natural Dancing, Skating, 
Snowshoeing, Horseback riding. Individual Gymnastics, Formal Gym- 
nastics, Riflery and Bowling. 

209 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Spring term. — Outdoor Baseball, Field and Track, Tennis, Individual 
Gymnastics, Horseback Riding, Archery, Swimming, Folk Dancing, 
Riflery and Bowling. 

1-a, 2-b, 3-c. Physical Education. 

Required of Freshmen. Lab., 2 hrs.; 2 units. 

1.5-a, 2.5-b, 3.5-c. Physical Education. 

Required of Freshmen majoring in Physical Education. 
Lab., 4 hrs,; 4 units. 

4-a, 5-b, 6-c. Physical Education. 

Required of Sophomores. Lab., 2 hrs.; 2 units. 

4.5-a, 5.5-b, 6.5-c. Physical Education. 

Required of Sophomores majoring in Physical Education. 
Lab., 4 hrs.; 4 units. 

7-a, 8-b, 9-c. Physical Education. 

Required of Juniors. Lab., 2 hrs.; 2 units. 

7.5-a, 8.5-b, 9.5-c. Physical Education. 

Required of Juniors majoring in Physical Education. 
Lab., 4 hrs.; 4 units. 

10-a, 11-b, 12-c. Physical Education. 

Elective for Seniors. Lab., 2 hrs.; 2 units. 

10.5-a, 11. 5-b, 12.5-c. Physical Education. 

Required of Seniors majoring in Physical Education. 
Lab., 4 hrs.; 4 units. 

THEORETICAL SUBJECTS 

13-a. Health Problems. Lectures and discussions on college health 

problems. Reference readings and reports. Prof. Kirk and Miss 

Russell. 

Required of all Freshmen. Lee. or rec, 1 hr. ; prep., 1 hr.; 
2 units. 

14-a, 15-b, 16-c. The Theory and Practice of Play. This course 

deals with the theory, nature, and function of organized play. Very 

useful for those who intend to do playground work. Not open to 

Freshmen. Prof. Kirk. 

Required of majors. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 4 
units. 

210 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

17-b. History of Physical Education. This deals with ancient, 
mediaeval, and modern forms of physical education and traces the de- 
velopment into the present type. Miss Russell. 
Lee. or rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 3 hrs. ; 6 units. 

18-a, b. Kinesiology. This course deals with a consideration of body 
mechanics, the muscles involved in various movements, etc. Prof. 
Watson. 

Prerequisite: Zoology 33-a, 34-b, 35-c. Required of 
majors. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 6 units. 

19-c. Scouting. This subject includes methods of organizing and 
conducting girl scout troops, with special reference to subject material. 
Prof. Kirk. 

Required of majors. Lab., lee, or rec, 2 hrs,; prep., 2 
hrs.; 4 units. 

2(>-a, 21-b, 22-c. Clog and Folk Dancing. Intended chiefly for those 
especially interested in teaching physical education. Prof. Kirk and 
Prof. Watson. 

Required of majors. Lee or lab,, 2 hrs,; 2 units. 

23-a, 24-b, 25-c, 26-a, 27-b, and 28-c. Physical Education. Deals 
with teaching material, team plays, methods of coaching, and other 
phases of the subject which are of interest to the prospective teacher. 
Required of students majoring in Physical Education. 

23-a. Technique of Soccer and Formal Gymnastics. Miss Russell. 
Lab., 2 hrs.; lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; prep,, 2 hrs.; 6 units. 

24-b. Technique of Indoor Baseball and Basketball. Prof, Kirk. 
Lab., 2 hrs.; lee. or rec, 1 hr,; prep,, 1 hr, ; 4 units. 

25-c. Technique of Tennis, Archery and Outdoor Baseball. Prof. 
Kirk. 

Lab., 2 hrs.; lee or rec, 1 hr.; prep., 1 hr.; 4 units. 

26-a. Technique of Hockey and Natural Gymnastics. Prof. 
Watson. 

Lab., 2 hrs.; lee or rec, 1 hr.; prep., 1 hr.; 4 units. 

27-b. Technique of Natural, Folk, and Clog Dancing. Prof. Kirk. 
Lab., 2 hrs.; lee or rec, 1 hr.; prep., 1 hr.; 4 units. 

211 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

28-c. Technique of Track and Swimming. Prof. Watson. 
Lab., 2 hrs.; lee. or rec, 1 hr.; prep., 1 hr.; 4 units. 

29-a, 30-b, 31-c. Natural and Advanced Clog and Folk Dancing. 
Prof. Kirk. 

Required of students majoring in Physical Education. 
Lab., 2 hrs.; 2 units. 

32-a, 33-b, 34-c. Practice Teaching. An opportunity is given to 
teach in the public schools under supervision of the college instructors. 
Prof. Kirk. 

Prerequisites: 14-a, 15-b, 16-c. Required of majors. 
Lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 1 hr.; 3 units. 

35-a, 36-b. The Theory and Practice of Individual Gymnastics. 
This course is essentially an advanced course for those majoring in 
Physical Education. Prof. Watson. 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 18-a. Lee. or rec, 2 
hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 6 units. 

37-c. The Theory and Practice of Massage. This course is a con- 
tinuation of 36-b. Prof. Watson. 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 35-a, 36-b. Lee. or 
rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 6 units. 

38-c. Curriculum Building. Instruction in teaching, adaptation 
and preparation of lesson plans. Prof. Watson. 

Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 4 units. 

PHYSICS 

Horace L. Howes, Professor 
Clement Moran, Associate Professor 
Raymond R. Starke, Assistant Professor 
William H. Hartwell, Instructor 
Harold I. Leavitt, Instructor 

Major: 150 time units of departmental and related de- 
partmental subjects. 

1-a, 2-b, 3-c. Introductory College Physics. The properties of 
matter, heat, magnetism, electricity, wave-motion, sound, and light. 
The subject includes experimental lectures, laboratory exercises, recita- 

212 



PHYSICS 

tions from Kimball's "College Physics." Prof. Howes, Prof. Moran, 

Prof. Starke, Mr. Hartwell. 

Required of students in Agriculture. Elective for Arts 
students. Demonstration lecture, 1 hr.;rec., 2hrs.;lab.,2 
hrs, ; preparation and report writing, 3 hrs. ; 8 units. 

6-a, 7-b, 8-c. General Physics. Mechanics and properties of matter 

the first term, followed by heat and selected topics in sound and light 

the second term; magnetism and electricity the third term. Anderson's 

" Physics " and Henderson's " Problems in Physics " are used in recitation 

work. Prof. Howes, Prof. Moran, Prof. Starke. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 201-a, 202-b, and 203-c in 
advance and Mathematics 7-a, 8-b, and 9-c either in 
parallel or as a prerequisite. Required of Sophomore 
Engineers in the Chemical, Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 
and Industrial Courses. Elective for those Arts students 
who have passed Introductory College Physics and have 
the prerequisites in Mathematics. Rec, 3 hrs.; demon- 
stration lecture, 1 hr.; prep., 4>^ hrs.; 8}4 units. 

9-a. General Physics Laboratory. Open only to those students who 

are studying 6-a, or who have previously obtained credit for 6-a. 

Experiments in properties of matter and mechanics with report writing 

and curve-plotting. Reports are carefully criticized by the department 

and corrected by the student. The appreciation of the laws of physical 

science, with the development of laboratory technique and an estimation 

of the limitations of scientific experimentation is the aim. Prof. Moran, 

Prof. Starke, Mr. Hartwell, Mr. Leavitt. 

Prerequisite: The same as for General Physics. Required 
of Sophomores in Chemical, Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 
and Industrial Engineering Courses. Elective for Liberal 
Arts students under the same conditions as those specified 
for Physics 6-a. Lab., 5 hrs. ; report writing and graphical 
representation of data, 6 hrs.; 11 units. 

10-b. General Physics Laboratory. A continuation of Physics 9-a 

to include experiments in heat, sound, and light. Prof. Moran, Prof. 

Starke, Mr. Hartwell, Mr. Leavitt. 

Prerequisites: Physics 6-a and 9-a. Physics 7-b in 
parallel or as a prerequisite. Lab., 5 hrs.; report writing, 
5 hrs.; 10 units. 

11-c. General Physics Laboratory. A continuation of Physics 10-b 
to include experiments in electricity and magnetism. Prof. Moran, 
Prof. Starke, Mr. Hartwell, Mr. Leavitt. 

213 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisites: Physics 6-a, 7-b, 9-a, 10-b. Physics 8-c in 
parallel or as a prerequisite. Lab., 5 hrs. ; report writing, 
5 hrs.; 10 units. 

13-c. Elementary Optics and Photography. Lectures and recitation 
on the fundamental principles of geometrical optics as applied to photo- 
graphic instruments. ^ The laboratory is devoted to the study of focal 
planes, images and other properties of lenses, together with the making 
of photographs. Students will furnish their supplies. Prof. Moran. 

Prerequisites: Physics 1-a, 2-b, 3-c, or the equivalent. 
Not open to Freshmen. Rec, 1 hr.; lee, 1 hr.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 4 hrs.; 8 units. 

15-a. Theory of Electrons. A brief study of the theory of electricity 
to include the passage of a current through a gas by ions, the mobility 
of ions, the determination of the charge and mass of an electron, ioni- 
zation by collision, the corona discharge, cathode rays, positive rays, 
thermionic emission, photo-electricity, X-Rays. Prof. Howes. 

Prerequisites: Physics 8-c and 11-c. Mathematics 7-a, 
8-b, 9-c. Open only to Juniors and Seniors. Required 
of Seniors in Electrical Engineering. Lee, 2 hrs.; quiz, 
1 hr.; prep., 4 hrs.; 7 units. 

17-a, 18-b, 19-c. Pre-Medical Physics. An intensive course in the 
general principles of physics with especial attention to the needs of 
students in preparation for medical work. Prof. Starke. 

Open only to Juniors and Seniors in the Pre-medical 
Course. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 4 hrs.; preparation and 
report writing, 7 hrs. ; 14 units. 

25-b. Advanced Physics for Teachers. The aim is to study the 
most difficult topics to teach to high school or academy students. 
One standard college text and several high-school texts are used as 
reference books. Prof. Howes. 

Prerequisite: A one-year course in college Physics. Open 
only to Juniors and Seniors. Rec, 2 hrs.; lee, 1 hr. ; 
prep., 4>^ hrs.; lyi units. (Given in alternate years.) 

27-a, 28-b, 29-c. Applied Physics for Students in Architecture. 
Recitations and experiments with carefully criticized reports on the 
stresses in solids, pressure in fluids, transmission of heat, resonance of 
sound, intensity of light and distribution of illumination, the measure- 
ment of electric current, etc. Mr. Hartwell. 

214 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Required of Sophomores in Architecture. Lee, 1 hr.; 
rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; report writing, 2 hrs.; 
9 units. 

33-b, 34-c. Household Physics. A study of the principles of physics 
with applications to household processes and appliances. The recita- 
tions will be based on Osborn's "Physics of the Home." Prof. Moran. 

Required of Sophomores in Home Economics. Not open 
to Freshmen. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; lab., 2 
hrs. ; report writing, 1 hr. ; 10 units. 

37-c. Advanced Electrical Measurements. Laboratory work on 
such problems as battery resistance by a potentiometer method, conduc- 
tivity of electrolytes, low resistance by the Kelvin bridge, high resistance 
measurement, magnetic permeability, capacitance and inductance 
measurements, thermo- junction calibration, pyrometry. Prof. Moran. 

Prerequisites: Physics 8-c and 11-c. Required of Seniors 
in Electrical Engineering. Rec, 1 hr.; lab., 4 hrs.; prep., 
2 hrs.; 7 units. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Thorsten Kalijarvi, Associate Professor 
Philip G. Neserius, Instructor 

Major: 150 time units of Political Science and related sub- 
jects, exclusive of elementary subjects. 

Courses in this department aim to give the student a thorough ground- 
ing in Political Science which should not only serve the purpose of general 
culture, but also prepare for more intensive work in fields of specialized 
study, such as law, teaching, politics, government service, and social 
work. Students are strongly urged to supplement their work in Politi- 
cal Science with courses in Economics, History, and Sociology. The 
department, with the view of broadening the student's range of ideas or 
in preparation for research, strongly recommends the acquisition of a 
reading knowledge of one or more foreign languages, preferably French 
and German. 

Students taking the Pre-law Course must obtain an average of 75 or 
better in the following list of subjects: 

Political Science— 101-a, 102-b, 103-c 
Political Science— 104-a, 105-b, 106-c 
Political Science — 113-a, 114-b, 115-c 

215 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Political Science — 118-c 

Political Scienc^-122-a, 123-b, 124-c 

and in enough advanced subjects to make a total of 100 time units. 

GROUP I 
INTRODUCTORY COURSES 

101-a, 102-b, 103-c. An Introduction to the Principles of Political 

Science. All majors in this department are expected to take this course. 

It treats with fundamentals in political science. Classes will be largely 

devoted to lectures occasionally supplemented with a discussion. Text. 

Collateral reading. Prof. Kalijarvi. 

Open to Sophomores with a course in Social Science, or to 
such as intend to major in this department. Lee. or rec, 
3 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs. ; 6 units. 

104-a. American Government. A discussion of both federal and 
state governments in the United States. This discussion will include 
the origin and development of American political institutions, the inter- 
relation of governmental departments, the tendencies for the federal 
government to expand its powers, and the national party system. A 
text and collateral reading will be required. Classes will be largely 
discussion supplemented by an occasional lecture. Mr. Neserius. 

Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors who have had 
courses in the social sciences. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 
6 hrs.; 9 units. 

105-b. Constitutional Law. The aim in this course is to supplement 
in part 104-a, but more especially to survey the constitutional develop- 
ment of this country and government in the terms of supreme, federal, 
and state court decisions. Mr. Neserius. 

Open on the same terms as 104-a. Purely discussion. 
Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

106-c. Municipal Government. This is the logical conclusion to a 

complete survey of local, state, and federal government in the United 

States, which 104-a and 105-b begin. A study of the organization and 

growth of municipal government, the relation of the city to the state, 

the mechanism and legal status of the municipal community, and an 

examination in detail of the government of four or more large typical 

American cities. Mr. Neserius. 

Open on the same basis as 104-a and 105-b. Lee or rec, 
3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

216 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

107-a, 108-b. European Governments. A survey of the British and 

continental systems of government. Details will be stressed only as 

time will permit. Discussion very largely. Mr. Neserius. 

Prerequisite: History 16-a or its equivalent. Consent 
of the instructor in special cases may override require- 
ments. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs,; prep,, 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

109-c. Colonial Governments. This course is the logical successor 

to 107-a and 108-b. The development of colonial empires such as those 

of England, France, Italy, United States, and former Germany will be 

taken up. Mr. Neserius. 

Prerequisite as in 107-a and 108-b. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

GROUP II 
INTERMEDIATE COURSES 

113-a, 114-b, 115-c. International Law. The study of the law 

governing the relations among the various states. Primarily discussions 

supplemented by the weekly preparation of hypothetical cases. Prof. 

Kalijarvi. 

Prerequisites: 101-a, 102-b, 103-c. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

116-a, 117-b. Comparative Government. A survey of the theories 

underlying governments in general. A comparison of the organs or 

institutions of government as they are observed in action or as they 

may be evaluated in theory. Mr. Neserius. 

Open to any major in the department, or to those who have 
had any work in the field from 104-a to 109-c Also ad- 
mission to the class may be obtained with the consent of 
the instructor, Lee or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

118-c. Introduction to Jurisprudence. A study of the generalized 

principles of law and legal institutions. A systematic review of the 

law as a whole, investigating the historical, sociological, analytical, and 

philosophical methods. Discussion and lecture. Mr. Neserius, 

Prerequisite : The student must have taken or be taking one 
of the subjects in Group II. Lee or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 6 
hrs.; 8 units. 

GROUP III 
ADVANCED COURSES 

119-a, 120-b, 121-c. Political Theory. For majors in the depart- 
ment when they have reached their Junior year. Also for graduate 

217 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

students. The work consists of directed reading in political science. 

Mr. Neserius. 

Open only to students in the department or with the in- 
structor's consent. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 8 
units. 

122-a, 123-b, 124-c. Seminar. Prof. Kalijarvi. 

Open to all majors and graduate students to meet course 
requirements or with the department's consent. Papers 
will be prepared on assigned topics and reports made under 
the guidance of the head of the department or a proxy. 
Lee. or rec, 1 hr.; prep., 3 hrs.; 4 units. 

125-a, 126-b, 127-c. Research and Thesis. Prof. Kalijarvi. 

Required of all graduate students. Open to Seniors 
majoring in the department who have attained a high aver- 
age. Only a limited number will be admitted. This course 
cannot be taken without the consent of the head of the de- 
partment. A flexible way of testing out the student who 
must conduct original research himself under the super- 
vision of the head of the department. He will be directed 
and instructed in the methods of research by conference. 
Credit to range from 4 to 12 for undergraduates and from 
4 to 25 for graduates. 

128-a, 129-b, 130-c. International Relations, or World Government. 

A study of the forms of international organizations and world politics. 

This course deals with the rise of the modern nations and their relations 

to each other. Prof. Kalijarvi. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors majoring in Political Science, 
History or Economics. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 10 hrs.; 
12 units. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

T. Burr Charles, Professor 
Carl L. Martin, Assistant Professor 
Homer O. Stuart, Instructor 
Charles A. Bottorff, Instructor 

1-c. Farm Poultry. A general subject in poultry husbandry, tak- 
ing up the breeds, housing, incubation, brooding, feeding, breeding, 
culling and selection, and management. Prof. Charles and Mr. Stuart. 

Required of all Sophomores in Agriculture except those 
in Forestry. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 2}4 hrs.; prep., 2>^ hrs.; 
7 units. 

218 



POULTRY 

5-b. Poultry Management. A subject in poultry management in 
which the students lay out plans for, and make drawings of a 1,000- 
bird poultry plant, taking into consideration every phase of management. 
Prof. Charles. 

Prerequisite: Poultry 1-c. Required of all Seniors in 
Poultry. Elective for others. Lee, 3 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 4 hrs. ; 9 units. 

6-b. Poultry Diseases. A subject treating of the anatomy of fowl, 
with clinics showing various common poultry diseases, and lectures 
giving methods of prevention and treatment. Mr. Bottorff. 

Prerequisite: 1-c. Required of all Juniors in Poultry. 
Elective for others. Lee, 3 hrs.; lab., lyi hrs.; prep., 4>^ 
hrs.; 10 units. 

7-b. Incubation. A study of the theories involved in incubation 
and brooding, with each student running an incubator and keeping all the 
necessary records. Mr. Stuart. 

Prerequisite: Poultry 1-c. Required of all Seniors in 
Poultry. Elective for others. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 5 hrs.; 
prep., 3 hrs. ; 10 units. 

9-c. Poultry Feeding. A subject dealing with the principles of 
feeding, and the comparative value of various grains and feeds used in 
poultry feeding. Each student is obliged to do practical work in feeding 
and caring for a flock of hens. Prof. Charles and Mr. Stuart. 

Prerequisite: Poultry 1-c. Required of Seniors in Poul- 
try and Teacher Training. Elective for others. Lee, 3 
hrs.; lab., 4 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 10 units. 

10-a. Poultry Breeding. A subject giving the theory and practice 
involved in breeding for egg production, including practical work in 
the selection of breeding stock. Prof. Charles and Mr. Stuart. 

Prerequisite: Poultry 1-c. Required of all Seniors in 
Poultry. Elective for others. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 
7 units. 

11-b. Poultry for Teachers. This subject is designed to give to 

Teacher Training students the information which they will need in 

teaching Poultry in secondary schools. Open to Teacher Training 
students only. Mr. Stuart. 

Lee, 1 hr.; lab., lyi hrs.; prep., \]/2 hrs.; 5 units.. 

219 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

12-c. Poultry Brooding. This is a laboratory subject designed to give 
to students special information in the care and management of chicks. 
Required of Teacher Training and Poultry students. Mr. Stuart. 

Lab., 4 hrs.; 4 units. 

13-c. Poultry Practice. This subject is designed to give the stu- 
dent practical work at a successful poultry plant, somewhere in the State 
of New Hampshire, in the hatching and rearing of chickens. The 
student will be obliged to spend the time from April 1 to September 1 
on a poultry plant to be selected by the head of the department. 

Required of all Juniors in Poultry. 50 units. 

14-a, 15-b, 16-c. Poultry Research. In this subject the student 
makes a study of some poultry problem, getting such accurate and de- 
tailed information as will add materially to his fund of knowledge. 
Prof. Charles and staflF. 

Required of all Seniors in Poultry. Hours to be arranged. 
6 to 9 units. 

17-b. Poultry Marketing. A study of the market classes of poultry 
and eggs, their preparation for market, packages used, the storage of 
poultry, the storage and preservation of eggs and the judging and scoring 
of eggs and poultry. Prof. Charles. 

Required of all Juniors in Poultry. Elective for others. 
Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 7 units. 

22-c. Poultry House Design and Construction. Students design and 
construct various types of poultry houses and equipment. Prof. 
Charles and Mr. Batchelder. 

Required of all Seniors in Poultry. Elective for others. 
Lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 1 hr. ; 3 units. 

23-a. Poultry Breeds and Judging. The history, characteristics 
and classification of the different breeds of poultry. Laboratory will 
consist of practice in judging and scoring of fowls from the utility and 
exhibition standpoint. Mr. Stuart. 

Required of Poultry Seniors. Elective for others. Lee, 2 
hrs.; lab., 2^ hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 6>^ units. 

31-a, 32-b, 33-c. Poultry Seminar. A seminar subject where each 
student studies recent bulletins on poultry subjects, writes abstracts of 
them, and delivers to the class an opinion on these bulletins. Group dis- 

220 



SOCIOLOGY 

cussions covering pertinent poultry topics will also be held. Prof, 

Charles and staff. 

Prerequisite: Poultry 1-c. Required of all Seniors in 
Poultry. Elective for others. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 2 hrs.; 5 
units. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Donald C. Babcock, Professor {In Charge) 
Esther L. Brown, Assistant Professor 
Philip M. Marston, Assistant Professor 
Roland E. Partridge, Assistant Professor 
Gwendolyn Jones, Instructor 

1-a, 2-b, 3-c. Social Science. Social Viewpoints, an introduction 
to the social sciences. Various approaches to the problems of human 
society will be made, taking by turn the points of view of the anthro- 
pologist, the biologist, the historian, the economist, the sociologist, etc. 
The influence of physical environment upon man, the evolution of the 
major institutions and the significance of some of the problems con- 
fronting society will be discussed. 

Required as a group elective for Freshmen in Liberal Arts. 
A prerequisite for Education, History, Philosophy, Psy- 
chology, and Sociology. Elective for Sophomores by per- 
mission. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Albert N. French, Professor 

Hannibal G. Duncan, Associate Professor 

Roland E. Partridge, Assistant Professor 

Major: 150 time units of departmental and related de- 
partmental subjects, exclusive of elementary subjects. 

Graduate work: See Catalog of the Graduate School. 

It is the purpose of this department to present to students, in a con- 
structive manner, some of the major theories and principles, results of 
scientific investigations, and general in^formation regarding associa- 
tional activities and relationships in their various forms. 

In addition to general background and fundamental courses, special 
courses are designed (1) to supplement the work in other departments 
where a better understanding of social relations would be an asset, and 
(2) to offer preparatory professional courses to those anticipating the 

221 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

teaching of sociology, engaging in social work, personnel work, and 
group leadership. 

It is recommended that majors in the Department of Sociology acquire 
fundamental training in Psychology and Zoology and add as preferred 
electives such supplementary courses as Principles of Economics, or 
Political Science, or Philosophy, and when their backgrounds will permit. 
Economics 10-a, Statistics 7-b, Philosophy 34-a, 35-b, 36-c, and 
Political Science 119-a, 120-b, 121-c and 118-c. 

Initial Subjects — Group A 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

14-a, 15-b, 16-c. Principles of Sociology. This elementary course 
aims to give the student a background for social relationships. It 
presents some of the viewpoints of modern sociologists; discusses some of 
the major social problems and social institutions; sets forth and analyzes 
the basic principles of sociology as related to the foundations of social 
life; suggests the development of personality, isolation versus social 
interaction, and social control. Prof. Duncan. 

Required of all majors in Sociology. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; 

prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

20-a, 21-b. Social Survey. This elementary survey of the social 
aspects of intellectual history includes a comparative study of the 
writings of early social theorists as well as present-day sociologists. 
Particular attention will be given to the development of outstanding con- 
cepts and theories deemed necessary as a cultural background. Prof. 
Partridge. 

Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

22-c. Social Emergence. A synthetic study in social amelioration, 
social evolution and social work. Prof. Partridge. 

Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. (Previously 
given as 25-b.) 

Secondary Subjects — Group B 
Prerequisites: Junior standing and Sociology 14-a, 15-b, 
and 16-c 

17-a. Social Psychology. An analytic study of human traits in so 
far as these are basic to a study of social personality and social psy- 
chology. The approach is largely from the angle of sociology. Prof. 
French. 

222 



sociologV 

Required of all majors. Prerequisite: 3 terms of major 
standing or instructor's permission to register. Lee. or 
rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 6 hrs. ; 9 units. 

18-b. Societal Psychology. A further analytic study of the princi- 
ples of social psychology largely from the standpoint of psychology. A 
more detailed analysis of the social dynamics of nature and nurture, of 
modifying human traits, of heredity and social environment, of behavior 
and creative experience, of institutional stimuli and cultural responses. 
Prof. French. 

Prerequisite: Major standing or instructor's permission to 
register. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

19-c. Social Dynamics. A synthetic study of the principles of social 
change, social conflict, etc., in light of modern biology, psychology, 
education and other social sciences. The approach is philosophical. 
Prof. French. 

Prerequisite: Preliminary study in General Psychology or 
Philosophy 34-a. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 
units. (Previously given as 24-a.) 

23-a. Man and Culture (Anthropology). It is the purpose of this 
course to treat the characteristics of pre-historic races and their culture, 
together with the criteria used in distinguishing various human races and 
stages of culture; to study specifically the psychological and sociological 
implications involved in rites, beliefs, and other cultural acquisitions of 
man. Prof. Duncan. 

Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 6 units. (Previously 
given as 19-c.) 

24-b. Race and Population Problems. This course consists of 
theories and policies of population; the increase of numbers; the problems 
of quality as affected by the differential birth rate, migrations, and racial 
mixtures; the sociological effects of cultural diffusion; and the control 
of population increase. Prof. Duncan. 

Lee or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 6 units. 

25-c. Immigration and Assimilation. This course deals with im- 
migrant backgrounds, immigrants, their children and grandchildren. 
It traces the natural process of assimilation, showing the conflicts and 
adjustments peculiar to each generation. Prof. Duncan. 

Lee or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 6 units. 

223 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

26-a. Social Research. A general treatment of the technique in 
gathering data and the various methods of evaluation. Certain com- 
prehensive problems like marriage and the family, criminology, social 
work, etc., will be studied by appropriate methods. Prof. Duncan. 

Required of all majors. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs. ; prep., 6 hrs. ; 9 
units. 

28-b. Urban-Rural Sociology. This course is a survey of certain 
problems and conditioning factors and influences of community life, 
trends in quality and quantity of population and of suggested remedial 
measures for improvement. Prof. French. 

Required of Juniors in Agricultural Teacher Training. 
Lee. or rec, 2 hrs. ; prep., 4 hrs.; 6 units. 

27-b. Criminology. This subject presents a general survey of the 
theories of crime; the causes of crime from the viewpoint of personality 
and the social situation; and the aims underlying the treatment of 
offenders. Prof. French. 

Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

29-c. Educational Sociology. This course is a study of educational 
procedures considered in the light of psychological theory and the 
principles of sociology. Prof. French. 

Prerequisite: A professional interest in teaching. Re- 
quired of Seniors in Home Economics Teacher Training. 
Lee or rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 6 hrs.; 9 units. 

29.5-c. Social Work. The purpose of this course is to give an in- 
sight into the nature of social work. Prof. French. 

Lee or rec, 2 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 6 units. (Given as 40-c 
in 1929-30.) 

Advanced Subjects — Group C 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of the pro- 
fessor in charge. 

30-a, 31-b, 32-c. Seminar: Sociological Research. Provision is 
here made for social research. Typical methods involved in the tech- 
nique are first studied and illustrated; later opportunity is given to pur- 
sue the following subjects: 

(a) A seminar in population problems. 

(b) A seminar in social case work. 

(c) A seminar in social theory. 

224 



STATISTICS 

Prerequisite: A major in Sociology or the equivalent, 
otherwise by invitation. Credit to be arranged. 

33-c. Seminar: Professional Research. Methods of teaching social 
science in high school and junior college are studied. Objectives, 
selection, organization and presentation of content are analyzed. 
Seniors planning to teach may request invitation. Prof. French. 

Credit to be arranged. 

STATISTICS 

George N. Bauer, Professor 

i-a, 2-b. Statistical Methods. This is a basic course and aims to 
present some of the fundamental principles and methods of statistics. 
It is designed as the introductory course for students of business and 
engineering. It deals with such topics as the graphical representation 
of statistical material, frequency distribution, measure of dispersion, 
averages, time series, index numbers, and correlation. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 103-c or Mathematics 8-b or 
8-c. Required of Sophomores in the Business Funda- 
mentals Course, of Juniors in the Industrial Engineering 
Course, and recommended for Sociology majors. Rec, 3 
hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 7 units. 

4-a, 5-b. Economic and Business Statistics. Applications of the 
statistical method to economic and business problems. Price levels, 
seasonal changes, economic cycles, principles used in business forecasting 
including a consideration of existing business barometers. 

Prerequisites: Statistics 1-a and 2-b. Elective for 
Juniors and Seniors. Rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 5 hrs.; 8 units. 

7-c. Social Statistics. Applications of the statistical method to 
social problems. Some of the recent results achieved in this field. A 
study of the relation of certain social phenomena to the economic cycle. 
Application of the method of correlation to determine the lag of one 
time series in relation to another. 

Prerequisites: Statistics 2-b. Recommended for majors in 
Sociology. Electivefor Juniors and Seniors. Rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 5 hrs.; 8 units. 

225 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

ZOOLOGY 

C. Floyd Jackson, Professor 

Alma D. Jackson, Associate Professor 

Edythe M. Richardson, Assistant Professor 

* Donald G. Barton, Instructor 

Dorothy T, Barton, Instructor 

James M. Sanders, Instructor 

John E. Sheehan, Assistant 

Ruth E. Thompson, Assistant 

Major: 150 time units in this and related departments, 
exclusive of elementary subjects. 

Graduate work: For subjects primarily for graduate study 
see Catalog of the Graduate School. 

Courses in the Department of Zoology are divided as follows: 

Group A is primarily for Liberal Arts students, pre-medical students, 
and those majoring in Zoology. Students from other courses may, 
however, elect from this group, provided they have the proper prerequi- 
sites. 

Group B includes the required subjects in Agriculture and Home 
Economics, as well as certain other electives for either Agriculture, 
Home Economics or Liberal Arts students. 

Group C includes advanced subjects primarily for major or pre-medical 
students. 

Note: Students desiring to prepare for Medical or Dental Schools 
will consult the head of the department. 

Students pursuing the regular Pre-medical Course must obtain a 
grade of 75 or better in at least 100 time units during their junior and 
senior years. 

Group A. Liberal Arts Subjects 

1-a, 2-b, 3-c. Principles of Zoology. An elementary study of the 

principles of life, its development, structural basis and physiological 

activity. The subject is continuous throughout the year. This subject 

is intended to give a practical knowledge of animal life, and is required of 

all pre-medical students and others intending to major in the Department 

of Zoology. Students are advised to carry the laboratory work (Zoology 

4-a, 5-b and 6-c) parallel with this subject. Prof. Jackson. 

Freshmen subjects. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 5 hrs.; 10 units. 

* On leave of absence. 

226 



ZOOLOGY 

13-a, 14-b, 15-c. Hygiene and Sanitation. A detailed study of the 
principles of health preservation. The subject deals with hygiene of 
digestion, muscular hygiene, neural hygiene, and various other impor- 
tant physiological processes affecting health. The latter half of the work 
is devoted to a study of food, water, and general sanitation, and the con- 
trol of bacterial disease. The subject is continuous throughout the year. 
Prof. Jackson. 

Prerequisite: One year of Zoology. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 4 hrs.; 7 units. 

16-a, 17-b, 18-c. Evolution and Eugenics. Lectures and assign- 
ments dealing with the various problems of evolution and their relation 
to human life. Evidence of man's origin based on anatomical, embryonic, 
and paleontological data, will be discussed. This will be followed 
by a consideration of the chief problems of eugenics. Prof. Jackson. 

Prerequisite: Two years of Zoology. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; 
prep., 4 hrs.; 7 units. 

19-a, 20-b, 21-c. Advanced Zoology. Arranged to suit the need of 
students who wish to specialize in Zoology. Two lectures a week will 
deal with the teaching of zoology; methods of presenting the subject 
both in high schools and colleges; methods of conducting laboratory 
classes; the grading of examination papers and the preparation of labora- 
tory material. In addition students may choose for laboratory work 
some special subject for investigation. 

Prerequisite: This subject may not be elected except by 
students who have completed at least 75 units in Zoology 
or Entomology with an average grade of at least 80. Open 
only to students by special permission. Credit and hours 
to be arranged. 

22-a, 23-b, 24-c. General Taxonomy and Morphology. A study of 

the structure, classification, habits, and ecological relationships of the 

different groups of invertebrate animals, and the classification and 

ecological relationships of the vertebrates. The purpose of this subject 

is to acquaint the student with a large number of type forms, and with 

the identification, habits, and habitats df the common invertebrate and 

vertebrate animals. Mrs. Barton. 

Required of Zoology majors. Prerequisite: One year of 
Zoology. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 4 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 10 
units. 

30-b, 31-c. General Zoology. A detailed study of the fundamental 
principles of life; the nature and physiology of protoplasm; the struc- 

227 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

ture of the cell and the processes of cell division. The structure and 

physiology of man will be discussed in detail. Mr. Sanders. 

Required of Freshmen in Agriculture. Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; 
lab., iy2 hrs.; prep., 3>^ hrs.; 8 units. 

32-a. Genetics. A detailed study of the physical basis of inherit- 
ance, laws governing Mendelian inheritance, and the application of such 
laws to plant and animal breeding. (Same content as 50-c.) For agri- 
cultural students. Prof. Richardson. 

Lee. or rec, 2 hrs.; lab., lyi hrs.; prep., 3>^ hrs.; 8 units. 

33-a, 34-b, 35-c. Human Anatomy and Physiology. A survey 

of the structure and function of the human body, with a study of the 

fundamental principles of hygiene as applied to the different systems. 

Collateral readings, written reports and conferences required. Prof. 

Richardson. 

Required of Sophomores in Home Economics. Elective 
for Liberal Arts Sophomores not having credit in 2-b and 
3-c. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 8 units. 

Group C. Advanced Major and Pre-medical Subjects 

36-a, 37-b, 38-c. Histology. A study of the detailed structure of 
vertebrate animals, cell specialization and the manner in which tissues 
are combined into organs. The subject is of special interest for pre- 
medical students, those interested in becoming laboratory technicians 
or in teaching zoology. A great deal of attention is paid to general 
histological technique. Prof. A. D. Jackson. 

Prerequisite: Two years' work in Zoology. Junior subject. 
Lee or rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 6 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 12 units. 

39-a, 40-b, 41-c. Embryology. A detailed study of invertebrate 
and vertebrate embryos and their method of development. The first 
term's work is a brief resume of invertebrate embryology for six weeks. 
Protochordata one week, and the remainder of the term on vertebrates, 
closing with the development of the frog. The second term is spent 
entirely on the chick. The third term deals with mammalian embryol- 
ogYi the last half being spent on human embryology. Lectures and 
text books are used throughout the course. Laboratory work is on type 
specimens of available embryos. The subject is primarily for pre-medi- 
cal and advanced zoology students. Prof. A. D. Jackson. 

Prerequisite: Two years' work in Zoology. Senior subject. 
Lee or rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 4 hrs.; prep., 5 hrs.; 12 units. 

42-a, 43-b, 44-c. Advanced Physiology. An advanced study of 
human physiology with special emphasis on nutrition, circulation, respi- 

228 



ZOOLOGY 

ration, excretion and secretion. The work will consist of lectures, 

assigned topics and laboratory experiments. Mrs. Richardson. 

Prerequisite: Two years' work in Zoology. Lee. or rec, 
3 hrs.; lab., 1)4. hrs.; prep., 6>^ hrs.; 12 units. (Not given 
in 1931-32.) 

45-a, 46-b, 47-c. Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates. A 

careful study of the anatomy of the vertebrate animals. The first 
term's work is osteology and myology; the second term considers the 
digestive and vascular systems; the third, respiratory, excretory, repro- 
ductive, and endocrine systems. Laboratory dissections are made of 
each type of vertebrate. This is a fundamental course for pre-medical 
students, students of physical education, or those interested in advanced 
zoology. Mr. Sanders. 

Prerequisites: Zoology 1-a, 30-a or 33-a. Sophomore 
subject. Lee. or rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 5 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 12 
units. 

48-a, 49-b, 5Q-C. Cytology and Genetics. A detailed study of the 
cell, including morphology, the chemical and physical nature of proto- 
plasm, mitosis, meiosis, syngamy, and related phenomena leading up to 
the physical basis of inheritance and the study of Mendel's laws, the ex- 
pression and interaction of the genes, linkage, sex and its inheritance, the 
inheritance of quantitative characters, and the types and causes of 
variations. Prof. Richardson. 

Prerequisite: Two years' work in Zoology. Lee. or rec, 
3 hrs.; lab., l]/2 hrs.; prep., 6^ hrs.; 12 units. 

5 1-a, 52-b, 53-c. Advanced Neurology. A comparative study of the 
nervous systems of the lower animals and a detailed study of the mor- 
phology, physiology, and histology of the human nervous system. This 
subject is intended to give a practical knowledge of the nervous system 
and its operation. Prof. Richardson. 

Prerequisite: Two years' work in Zoology. Lee. or rec, 3 
hrs.; lab., lyi hrs.; prep., 6>^ hrs.; 12 units. (Not given 
in 1930-31.) 

Zoology 100-a,-b,-c. Zoology Honors. Each term the head of the 
Department of Zoology will permit not more than two percent of the 
most proficient students in Zoology to transfer to this subject. This will 
consist of the work elected and such additional work as may be pre- 
scribed, which will include conferences and a thesis; to be followed at the 
close of the term with a comprehensive examination which may include 
all previous work taken in the department. 

Prerequisites: Special appointment. Credit: To be ar- 
ranged. 

229 



THE TWO-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE 

Frederick W. Taylor, Dean 



The Two- Year Course in Agriculture which was established in 1895 
affords a splendid opportunity for the farm boys of the state to acquaint 
themselves with the fundamental principles and with the latest and 
most approved practices of agriculture. This course is arranged espe- 
cially for the young men who wish to make a business of dairying, live- 
stock raising, poultry, horticulture or general farming, but who do not 
have the time, money or preparation to take a regular four-year course. 

The classes of the two-year course are for the most part separate and 
distinct from those of the four-year courses. The work of the first year 
is largely a study of the sciences like bacteriology, chemistry, botany, and 
physiology which underlie successful plant and animal production. In 
short, the student is made to understand the scientific reasons for our 
common farm practices. The second year contains numerous elective 
subjects which make it possible for students to spend at least two-thirds 
of their time in specializing along some particular line of work in which 
they expect to engage later on. 

The two-year course now consists of three terms of about twelve 
weeks each for two years. Students may enter at the beginning of the 
winter or spring terms, although we advise them to enter only at the 
beginning of the course in September. The work of this course is 
made as thorough and practical as the limited time will permit. The 
students are given practice both in the laboratory and in the field in 
doing many of the very things which are taught them in the classroom. 

Military Science is not required of two-year students, but any student 
desiring to take this subject may elect it with the four-year students. 

A student who meets the entrance requirements of the University 
may receive credit, towards graduation from a four-year course in the 
College of Agriculture, for work completed with a grade of 75 or better 
in certain agricultural subjects of the two-year course. 

Entrance Requirements. — The two-year course is open to both young 
men and young women. The only entrance requirements are a common 
school education involving a reasonable knowledge of reading, writing, 
spelling, arithmetic, English grammar, geography, and United States 
history. The course is best adapted to students from 17 to 21 years of 
age. Older students frequently take the course, but younger ones are 
not encouraged to enter. 

230 



TWO-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE 

Tuition and Fees. — The tuition for students who are residents of New 
Hampshire is $75 per year. For out-of-state students the tuition is 
$175 per year. One-third of the tuition is payable at the beginning of 
each term. 

Scholarships. — The University grants to residents of the state a lim- 
ited number of scholarships which cover the tuition charges. Students 
desiring to secure scholarships should apply to the Dean of the Faculty, 
Durham, N. H. 

Expenses. — The expenses of this course will vary with the tastes and 
frugality of the students. An estimate of the expenses for one year is 
as follows : 

High Average Low 

Tuition 

Books 

Room 

Board 

Laundry 

Incidentals 

$625 $437 $300 

Farm Experience Requirement. — In order to graduate from this 
course every student must present satisfactory evidence of having had 
practical experience in farm work, either through having worked on a 
farm for at least two years after he was 12 years of age, or through having 
worked on a farm for at least four months after he was 15 years of age. 

Opening — Closing. — The course for this year will open Monday, 
September 22, 1930, and will close Monday, June 15, 1931. A Christmas 
recess of two weeks and a spring recess of seven days is given. 

Certificate of Graduation. — No degree is given at the end of this 
course, but a "Certificate of Graduation" is presented to all students 
who complete the prescribed course of 270 units or its equivalent. 



$175 


$75 




30 


25 


$22 


120 


72 


63 


215 


215 


175 


35 


20 


15 


50 


30 


25 



231 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



TWO-YEAR COURSE OF STUDY 

First Year 

Fall Winter Spring 
Term Term Term 
Units Units Units 

Eng. 201-a, 202-b, 203-c {Grammar and Composition) 8 8 8 

Agr'l Chem. 201-a, 202-b {Chemistry) 8 8 

Agr'l Eco. 203-a (Rural Economics) 8 

Agr'l Eco. 202-b (Farm Records and Accounts) 6 

Bot. 201-a, 202-b (Elements of Botany) 8 6 

Bot. 203-c (Plant Diseases) 5 

*A. H 201-b (Types and Breeds) 9 

*D. H. 201-a (Farm Dairying) 10 

*For. 201-c (Farm Forestry) 7 

M. E. 201-b (Agricultural Drawing) S 

M. E. 202-c (Forge Work) 3 

M. E. 203-c (Wood Shop) 5 

Hort. 201-c (Fruit Grmving) 7 

Zool. 201-c (Physiology and Hygiene) 7 

P. E. 51-a, 52-b. S3-c (Physical Education) 2 2 2 

Convocation 1 1 1 

45 45 45 

Second Year 

Agron. 202-a (Field Crops) 8 

Agron. 203-b (Soils) 7 

Agron. 201-c (Farm Equipment) 8 

Ento. 201-b (Economic Entomology) 7 

Convocation 1 1 1 

Electives from subjects listed below 36 30 36 

45 45 45 

Electives 

Agr'l Eco. 204-a (Agricultural Marketing) 6 

Agr'l Eco. 205-a (Farm Statistics) 6 

A. H. 203-a (Anatomy) 7K 

A. H. 205-a (Animal Breeding) 10 

Hort. 203-a (Greenhouse Management) 7 

Hort. 205-a (Orchard Problems) 8 

Hort. 207-a (Advanced Horticulture) 4—8 

P. H. 201-a (Farm Poultry) 8 

P. H. 205-a (Poultry Breeding) 7 

P. H. 208-a (Breeds and Judging) 6}4 

Agr'l Eco. 201-b (Farm Management) 9 

Agron. 204-b (Manures and Fertilizers) 7 

A. H. 202-b (Feeds and Feeding) 7 

A. H. 204-b (Animal Diseases) 7J^ 

D. H. 202-b (Dairy Manufactures) 10 

Hort. 204-b (Home Decoration) 8 

Hort. 208-b (Advanced Horticulture) 4-8 

P. H. 203-b (Poultry Diseases) 10 

P. H. 206-b (Incubation) 11 

P. H. 209-b (Poultry Marketing) 7 

A. H. 206-c (Animal Diseases) 7K 

D. H. 203-c (Dairy Production) 9 

Hort. 202-c (Vegetable Gardening) 7 

Hort. 206-c (Small Fruits) 7 

Hort. 209-c (Beekeeping) 7 

Hort. 210-c (Advanced Horticulture) 4-8 

P. H. 204-c (Poultry Feeding) 11 

P. H. 207-c (Poultry Brooding) 4 

* Students desiring to specialize in Poultry may substitute P. H. 201-a, 203-b and 
204-c for these subjects. 

232 



TWO-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE 

♦DESCRIPTION OF SUBJECTS OF TWO-YEAR COURSE 

IN AGRICULTURE 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

201-b. Farm Management. Textbook, lectures, and recitations 

relating to farming as a business. Problems of marketing, buying, size, 

cropping systems, balance in organization, etc. Prof. Eastman. 

Elective second year. Lee, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 5 
hrs.; 9 units. 

202-b. Farm Records and Accounts. Lectures and practical farm 
problems relating to the use of accounts and research information in 
farming. Actual farm figures used. Prof. Eastman. 

Required first year. Lee. and lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 
6 units. 

203-a. Rural Economics. Intended to acquaint the two-year man 
with some of the outstanding agricultural questions of the present time 
and their relation to theoretical and practical economics. Prof. Eastman . 
Required first year. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 5 hrs.; 8 units. 

204-a. Agricultural Marketing. A consideration of the increasing 
importance of marketing and some of its attendant problems. Special 
phases of cooperative marketing developed. Prof. Eastman. 

Elective second year. Lee, 3 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 6 units. 

205-a. Farm Statistics. An elementary subject dealing with prob- 
lems of chance in everyday occurrences, and with some consideration of 
dispersion and correlation. Prof. Eastman. 

Prerequisite: Algebra. Elective second year. Lee, 1 
hr.; lab., 2 hrs,; prep., 3 hrs.; 6 units. 

AGRONOMY 

201-c. Farm Equipment. This subject will include the mapping of 
farms, leveling for drains, a study of farm Tmplements and of farm build- 
ings. Practical exercises are given in map making, laying out drains, 
comparing farm machines, rope splicing, etc. Prof. Taylor. 

Required second year. Lee and ree, 2 hrs.; lab., 2>^ hrs.; 
prep., 3K hrs.; 8 units. 

* Only Two- Year students in Agriculture are admitted to these subjects, except by 
special arrangement with the Dean. 

233 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

202-a. Field Crops. Lectures and recitations on the culture, uses 
and value of the field crops grown in New England. Laboratory prac- 
tice will include seed testing, seed identification, corn and potato judg- 
ing, hay judging, and a study of the difi^erent legumes, grasses and grains. 
Mr. Higgins. 

Required second year. Lee. and rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 3 hrs. ; 8 units. 

203-b. Soils. Textbook and recitations upon the physical and 
chemical properties of soils. The subject will be made as practical as 
possible in its application to farm work. Laboratory experiments will 
be performed to illustrate the principles studied. Mr. Higgins. 

Required second year. Lee. and rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 3 hrs.; 7 units. 

204-b. Manures and Fertilizers. Textbook and recitations upon 
the constituents of farm manures, the home-mixing of fertilizers, and 
the modifications required by different soils and crops. Prof. Taylor. 

Elective second year. Lee. and rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 
7 units. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

201-b. Types and Breeds of Livestocks. A study of the different 
breeds of horses, cattle, sheep, and swine in respect to their origin, his- 
tory, development, characteristics, and adaptability to different con- 
ditions of climate and soil. One afternoon each week is devoted to 
judging the different breeds. 

Required first year. Lee and rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 4 hrs. ; 9 units. 

202-b. Feeds and Feeding. An elementary study of the laws of 
nutrition, the character, composition, and digestibility of feed stuffs, 
and the methods of feeding different kinds of farm animals. Numerous 
samples of grains and by-products are used for the purpose of familiariz- 
ing the students with the different feed stuffs. Practice is given in cal- 
culating rations for various purposes. 

Required second year. Lee and rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 
7 units. 

203-a. Anatomy of Farm Animals. Same as A. H. 4-a. T}4 units. 
Prof. Martin. 

234 



TWO-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE 

204-b. Animal Diseases. Same as A. H. S-b. 7>^ units. Prof. 
Martin. 

205-a. Animal Breeding. Same as A. H. 7-a. 10 units. 

206-c. Animal Diseases. Same as A. H. 6-c. 1}4 units. Prof. 
Martin. 

BOTANY 

201-a. Elements of Botany. In this subject the student is given a 
succinct account of the form and structure of plants, and of how plants 
grow and feed. Mr. Dunn. 

Required first year. Lee. and rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 4 hrs,; 
prep., 2 hrs.; 8 units. 

202-b. Elements of Botany. Similar to 201-a. Mr. Dunn. 

Required first year. Lee. and rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs,; 
prep., 2 hrs.; 6 units. 

203-c. Fungous Diseases of Plants. The principal fungous diseases, 
their cure and their prevention. Mr. Dunn. 

Required first year, Lee. and rec, 1 hr. ; lab., lyi hrs.; 
prep., \]4 hrs.; 5 units. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

201-a. Agricultural Chemistry. A study of the elementary princi- 
ples of chemistry, with special emphasis upon the elements of importance 
in agriculture. Prof. Phillips and Mr. Pickett. 

Required first year. Lee and rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 2^ hrs.; 
prep., 3^ hrs.; 8 units. 

202-b. Agricultural Chemistry. Elements of the chemistry of 
plants, soils, fertilizers, lime, foods and animal physiology. Prof. 
Phillips and Mr. Pickett. 

Prerequisite: Agricultural Chemistry 201-a. Required 
first year. Lee and rec, 2 hrs.; lat., lyi hrs.; prep., 3^ 
hrs.; 8 units, 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

201-a. Farm Dairying. A general survey of the field of dairy hus- 
bandry in all its phases. Mr. Moore. 

235 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Required first year.' Lee. and rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 5 hrs.; 10 units. 

202-b. Manufacturing Dairy Products. Producing, handling and 
distributing milk; manufacturing and distributing ice cream, butter, 
condensed milk and other dairy products. Mr. Moore. 

Elective second year. Lee. and rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 2^ hrs.; 
prep., 4>^ hrs.; 10 units. 

203-c. Dairy Production. The field of dairy husbandry in its rela- 
tion to the producer. Care, feeding and management of dairy animals; 
dairy herd development; dairy cattle judging. Prof. Fuller. 

Elective second year. Lee. and rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 4 hrs.; 9 units. 

ENGLISH 

201-a, 202-b, 203-c. Grammar and Elementary Composition. Prof. 

Cortez. 

Required first year. Lee. and rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 5 hrs.; 
8 units. 

ENTOMOLOGY 

201-b. Principles of Economic Entomology. The relation of the 
structure and classification of insects to methods of insect control. The 
preparation and application of insecticides. Spray machinery and appli- 
ances. Prof. O'Kane and Prof. Lowry. 

Required second year. Lee and rec. , 2 hrs. ; lab. , 2 yi hrs. ; 
prep., lyi hrs.; 7 units. 

FORESTRY 

201-c. Farm Forestry. The care and management of farm wood- 
lots; log and board scaling; logging and milling; estimating standing 
timber; protection from fire, insects, fungi, etc; thinning immature 
stands; seeding and planting; natural regeneration. Prof. Stevens. 

Required second year. Lee. and rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 3 hrs.; 7 units. 

HORTICULTURE 

201-c. Fruit Growing. This subject embraces a study of commercial 
orcharding. Each fruit is studied with reference to planting, culti- 

236 



TWO-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE 

vating, pruning, fertilizing, picking, packing, storing and marketing. 
Prof. Potter. 

Required first year. Lee. and rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 3 hrs.; 7 units. 

202-c. Vegetable Gardening. A study of the commercial methods 
of vegetable growing. Special attention is given to the home garden. 
Prof. Hepler. 

Elective second year. Lee. and rec, 2 hrs.; lab., lyi hrs.; 
prep., l]/^ hrs.; 7 units. 

203-a. Greenhouse Management. Combined lecture, demonstra- 
tion and laboratory work in greenhouse management. Mr. Macfarlane. 

Elective second year. Lee. and rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 3 hrs.; 7 units. 

204-b. Home Decoration. A study of ornamental trees, shrubs 
and flowers; their culture, proper arrangement and decorative value, 
with special reference to the home surroundings. Prof. Hepler. 

Elective second year. Lee. and rec, 2 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; 
prep., 4 hrs.; 8 units. 

205-a. Orchard Problems. This subject deals with the principal 
problems of farm and commercial orchard management. It is designed 
to show the application of the principles of fruit growing to practical 
conditions. Prof. Latimer. 

Elective second year. Lee and rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 5 hrs.; 
8 units. 

206-c. Small Fruits and Plant Propagation. A study of the propa- 
gation of horticultural plants and the culture and marketing of miscel- 
laneous small fruits including the strawberry, cranberry, raspberry, 
blackberry, grape, and blueberry. This subject will also include a brief 
study of the principles of plant breeding. Prof. Latimer. 

Elective second year. Lee and rec, 2 hrs.; lab., lyi hrs.; 
prep., lyi hrs.; 7 units. 

207-a, 208-b, 210-c. Advanced Horticulture. Special work in any 
phase of horticulture may be taken by arrangement with the head of the 
department. Prof. Potter and staff. 

Prerequisites will depend upon the work taken. Elective 
second year. Hours and units to be arranged. 

237 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

209-c. Beekeeping. This subject deals with the life history and 
habits of honey bees with special reference to apiary conditions. The 
laboratory work consists of practice in handling bees, construction and 
use of hives, hive fittings, and winter cases. Prof. Hepler. 

Elective second year. Lee. and rec, 2 hrs. ; lab., lyi hrs.; 
prep., lYi hrs.; 7 units. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

201-a. Farm Poultry. A general subject designed especially for 
two-year students who are going back to the farm to take up practical 
poultry work. The subject will include work in managing, feeding, 
housing, breeding, incubation, brooding, and marketing, with laboratory 
work as practical as can be made. Prof. Charles and Mr. Stuart. 

Lee. and rec, 3 hrs.; lab., 2 hrs.; prep., 3 hrs.; 8 units. 

203-b. Poultry Diseases. Same as P. H. 6-b. 10 units. Dr. 
Bottorff. 

204-c. Poultry Feeding. Same as P. H. 9-c. 10 units. Prof. 
Charles and Mr. Stuart. 

205-a. Poultry Breeding. Same as P. H. 10-a. 7 units. Prof. 
Charles and Mr. Stuart. 

206-b. Incubation. Same as P. H. 7-b. 10 units. Mr. Stuart. 

207-c. Poultry Brooding. Same as P. H. 12-c. 4 units. Prof. 
Charles and Mr. Stuart. 

208-a. Breeds and Judging. Same as P. H. 23-a. dyi units. Mr. 
Stuart. 

209-b. Poultry Marketing. Same as P. H. 17-b. 7 units. Prof. 
Charles. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

201-b. Agricultural Drawing. A brief study of the use of drafting 
instruments, followed by sketches and working drawings of wood and 
concrete construction as applied to farm mechanics and farm buildings. 
Prof. Stolworthy. 

Lab., 5 hrs.; 5 units. 

238 



TWO-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE 

202-c. Forging. This is a study of the forging of iron and steel, and 
is designed to teach the operations of drawing, upsetting, welding, twist- 
ing, splitting and punching. A study is made of the construction, care, 
and management of the forge, and instruction is given in tempering, case 
hardening and annealing. Mr. O'Connell. 
Lab., 3 hrs. ; 3 units. 

203-c. Wood Shop. Farm carpentry and joinery. Care and use of 
tools, making of implements for the farm, and care of lumber on the 
farm. Mr. Batchelder. 

Lab., 5 hrs.; 5 units. 

ZOOLOGY 

201-c. Human Anatomy and Physiology. A general survey of the 

structure and physiology of the human body. The most important 

principles of hygiene will be pointed out from time to time as various 

systems are discussed. Mr. Sanders. 

Required first year. Lee. and rec, 3 hrs.; prep., 4 hrs.; 
7 units. 



239 



NEW HAMPSHIRE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 

STATION 

John C. Kendall, Director 



The New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, a branch of 
the University, was established by the state, August 4, 1887, under 
an act of Congress of March 2 of that year. This and subsequent acts 
appropriated funds for conducting research work on agricultural prob- 
lems in New Hampshire and throughout the nation. 

The investigations conducted by the Experiment Station vary ac- 
cording to their nature, some lasting through one season only and some 
covering a period of years. The projects of the Station which now 
number 84 include fundamental investigations to determine the under- 
lying principles of agricultural science and others of more practical 
application. 

Appropriations from the state enable the Experiment Station to carry 
on a much more extensive state service work on agricultural problems. 
Advantage of the opportunities offered by the Experiment Station has 
been taken by the state in connection with the tests of seeds, fertilizers, 
and feeding stuffs; and samples of these collected by the State Depart- 
ment of Agriculture are tested at the Station laboratories each year, in 
accordance with legislative enactments. 

Information relating to agricultural practices is supplied by the 
various departments and entails a large volume of correspondence in 
answer to individual inquiries. Samples of soil are tested; plants and 
insects are identified; blood samples from hens are tested, and post 
mortem examinations of animals made. 

The library of the Experiment Station, which is open daily to students 
and visitors, contains complete files of all bulletins issued by the experi- 
ment stations in other states, all United States Department of Agri- 
culture bulletins, and many other reports, bulletins and records as well 
as books of agriculture value. 

Publications of the Station comprise 249 bulletins of the regular series 
and 31 circulars, 39 technical bulletins, 25 scientific contributions and 4 
school bulletins. The publications cover a wide range of subjects and 
contain the information gathered by the experts of the Station while 
working on the various projects. The bulletins are issued at regular 
intervals and notices of publications are sent to all residents of New 
Hampshire requesting them. 

240 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE EXTENSION 

SERVICE 

(AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS) 
John C. Kendall, Director 



What the colleges and universities are to those young men and women 
who come within their walls, the extension service is, only to a lesser 
degree, to the thousands who are beyond the reach of the classroom. 

The teachings of the college and the findings of the Experiment Station 
and the United States Department of Agriculture are now being carried 
to farms and homes throughout the state by a regularly established 
force of field workers. A cooperative arrangement was first made pos- 
sible in 1914 between the United States Department of Agriculture, the 
state college and the counties of the state by the Smith-Lever Act of 
Congress, which appropriated funds to be offset by each state. This 
arrangement was extended by the State Legislature of 1925, which passed 
a special extension appropriation for county work, and by the Capper- 
Ketcham Act of Congress of 1928. There are now ten agricultural agents 
in the ten counties, ten home demonstration agents, and ten boys' and 
girls' club agents and five assistant agents. Farm management, dairy- 
ing, forestry, soils and crops, poultry, horticulture, nutrition, clothing 
and home management demonstrations are also conducted with special- 
ists in charge. 

The extension service works largely through a group of rural people 
known as the Farm Bureau, one of which has been formed in each 
county. With its corps of fifty-two men and women the extension 
service relieves the college teaching staff and station workers from much 
of the miscellaneous extension work which they handled in the past. It 
also carries the work to a much larger public and carries it in a much 
more intimate way than it would otherwise be possible to do. 

The publications of the extension servicfe comprise 162 press bulletins, 
103 circulars and 35 bulletins. Notices of new bulletins are sent to a 
mailing list, which is maintained in cooperation with the Experiment 
Station. Bulletins are sent free to all who request them. 

Reading courses in fifteen subjects in agriculture and home economics, 
prepared by members of the resident college staffs are offered during the 
winter months. 

241 



DEGREES AND HONORS, 1929 



At the Fifty-ninth Annual Commencement Exercises, Monday, 
June 17, 1929 at which Charles Stelzle of New York City made the 
Commencement address, President Edward M. Lewis conferred the 
following degrees and certificates: 

HONORARY DEGREES 

DOCTOR OF LAWS 

Charles William Tobey, Temple. 
William David Gibbs, St. Louis, Mo. 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Mary Lyon Cheney Schofield, Peterborough. 
George Martin Putnam, Contoocook. 

ADVANCED DEGREES 

MASTER OF ARTS 

In Education: 

Blanche Elliott Danforth, Th.B., Gordon College, 1928, Peabody, 

Mass. 
Florence Hamilton Hewitt, B.A., Wellesley, 1904, Portsmouth 
Minor: EngHsh. 

Thesis: "The Organization and Supervision of a High School Eng- 
lish Department with Special Reference to the Problem of Work- 
ing with Young Teachers." 
Helen Gwendolyn Jones, B.A., U. of N. H., 1927, Concord 
Frank Herbert Lewis, B.S., U. of N. H., 1922, Tilton 

Minor: Educational Psychology. 
Lester Eric Smith, B.A., Bates College, 1924, Rochester 

Minor: English. 
Ralph Frank Weston, B.A., U. of N. H., 1925, Pelham 
Minor: Educational Psychology. 

In History: 

Patrick John Murnane, B.A., U. of N. H., 1928, Somersworth 
Minor: English. 

242 



DEGREES 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 

In Agricultural and Biological Chemistry: 
Frank Stott Schlenker, B.S., U. of N. H., 1927, Haverhill, Mass. 
Minor: Chemistry and Physics. 
Thesis: "Chemical Phases of Poultry Paralysis." 

In Botany: 

Russell Bissey, B.S., Colo. Agri. College, 1927, Durham 
Minor: Agricultural and Biological Chemistry. 
Thesis: " Relative Values of Herbicides for the Control of Mustard." 
Ralph Richards Jenkins, B.S., U. of N. H., 1927, Durham 

Thesis: "Effect of Hydrocyanic Acid Gas on Greenhouse Plants 
Sprayed with Bordeaux Mixtures." 

In Chemistry: 

William Prescott White, B.S., U. of N. H., 1927, Rye Beach 
Minor: Agricultural and Biological Chemistry. 
Thesis: "The Oxidation of Ammonia from Crude By- Product 
Liquors." 

In Education: 
Samuel Lucky Cutler, B.S., Mass. Agri, College, 1927, Springfield, 
Mass. 
Thesis: "The Junior Craftsman League: — An Experiment in the 
Motivation of Manual Training for Character Education." 

In Entomology: 
James Gilder Conklin, B.S., Conn. Agri. College, 1926, Durham 
Minor: Horticulture. 

Thesis: "Some Details in the Performance of Lime-Sulphur Spray 
When Applied to Scale Insects." 
Charles Carlton Plummer, B.S., Conn. Agri. College, 1928, Durham 
Minor: Zoology. 

Thesis: "The Life History and Control of the White Pine Weevil in 
New Hampshire." 
Warren Adelbert Westgate, B.S., U. of N. H., 1928, Plainfield 
Minor: Agricultural and Biological Chemistry. 
Thesis: "Some Factors Involved in the Wetting, Penetration and 
Toxicity of Contact Insecticides." 

In Horticulture: 
Edwin Herbert Putnam, 2nd, B.S., U. of N. H., 1928, South Lynde 
boro 

243 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Minor: Botany. 

Thesis: "Growth Characteristics of the Mcintosh Apple." 
Edwin John Rasmussen, B.S., U. of Wis., 1927, Durham 

Minor: Chemistry. 

Thesis: "The Period of Blossom Bud Differentiation in the Baldwin 
and in the Mcintosh Apple." 
William Watson Smith, B.S., U. of N. H., 1924, Gilford 

Minor: Agricultural and Biological Chemistry. 

Thesis: "The Comparative Efficiency of Common and Cold 
Storage for Apples as Indicated by Respiration Rate." 

In Mathematics: 

Leo Henry Maynard, B.S., U. of N. H., 1926, Nashua 
Minor: Electrical Engineering. 
Thesis: "The Historical Development of Integration." 

In Political Science: 

Dorothy Nutting Prescott, LL.B., Portia Law, 1926, Haverhill, Mass. 
Minor: Economics. 

In Psychology: 

George Seavey Nossiff, B.A., U. of N. H., 1928, Dover 

Minor: Zoology. 
Susan Taylor Rinear, B.A., U. of Wis., 1924, Durham 
Minor: Sociology. 

Thesis: "A Study of the Social Intelligence of Fifty-seven Superior 
4-H Club Girls." 

In Zoology: 
Walter Albert Chipman, Jr., B.S., U. of N. H., 1927, Durham 
Minor: Chemistry. 

Thesis: "Studies of the Effects on the Offspring of the Prenatal 
Feeding of Caffeine to Albino Rats." 

DEGREES CONFERRED (258) 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

College of Agriculture (24) 

Name Course P. O. Address 

Leon Wallace Batchelder A. H. Durham 

Woodbury Dow Bell For. Hollis 

Maurice Elmer Bickford D. H. Center Harbor 

244 



DEGREES 



Name 
John Maurice Chandler 
Alexander Blackwood Currie 
Clyde Sutherland Eaton 
Guilford Smith Elwood 
John Beecher Evans 
Paul James Fenton 
Alexander Leo Guptill 
Richard Moses Hare 
George Warren Higgins 
Gerald Randolph Hyde 
Roger Manus Lindsay 
*Edward Butterfield McClenning 
Eric Lumsden McNab 
Walter Stokes Mason 
Warren Edward Percival 
Frank Dudley Reed 
*CharIes Mermier Smith 
♦Carl Emil Walker 
Howard Melvin Wiggin 



Oscar Sumner Aiken 
*Harold Willey Avery 
Theodore Henry Ayer 
Harold Marshall Babbitt 
Madelene Edson Bakeman 
Edwin Betz 
Jane Elizabeth Blake 
Dorothy Claire Block 
Joseph Edward Bourque 
Mary Elizabeth Breck 
Elizabeth Frances Brown 
Florence Melissa Brown 
Fred Herman Brown 
Robert Edmund Bruce 
Edward Henry Buff am 
David Robert Campbell 
William Laurence Chadwick 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


For. 


Bartlett 


A.H. 


Manchester 


P.H. 


Greenville 


P.H. 


Derry 


For. 


North Stratford 


T. T. 


A ndover 


T. T. 


Northwood 


Gen. 


Amherst 


Gen. 


Salem 


For. 


Goffstown 


For. 


Lakeport 


Gen. 


Westmoreland 


Hort. 


East Andover 


P.H. 


Canobie Lake 


For. 


Gorham 


P.H. 


Newport 


Hort. 


Laconia 


For. 


Contoocook 


Gen. 


Stratham 


beral Arts (102) 


Econ. 


Farmington 


Bus. Fund 


. Manchester 


Educ. 


Milton Mills 


Bus. Fund 


\. Hartford, Conn. 


Sociology 


Franklin 


Zoology 


Whitefield 


Econ. 


Manchester 


H. E. Tr. 


North Hampton 


Zoology 


Somersworth 


H. E. Tr. 


Claremont 


H. E. I. 


Ashland 


Math. " 


Derry 


Econ. 


Concord 


Educ. 


Ashland 


Pre-Med. 


Manchester 


Arch. 


Durham 


Bus. Fund. 


Sutton 



245 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
♦Randolph Wallace Chapman 
Elizabeth Lucinda Child 
Doris Hilda Clifford 
Hurley Eliphalet Cloutman 
Mildred Viola Corey 
Dane Pettee Cummings 
Margeret Valentina Dicey 
Gordon Sumner Dow 
John Henry Dow 
Roger Herwald Downing 
Lloyd Walter Dunlap 
Gertrude Alice Eldridge 
Lloyd Llewellyn Evans 
Ralph Maxon Garlock 
Arthur Gilbert 
Carmel Irene Goodhue 
Crystal Goodwin 
Beatrice Abigail Gray 
Donald Brooks Harriott 
Harris Hatch 
John Knight Hatch 
John Enoch Hayford, Jr. 
Virginia Porter Haynes 
Clarissa Hills 
Ethel Mae Hobbs 
Joseph Mahlan Houser 
*Cecil Vernon Howell 
Isabelle Madeline Huntoon 
Earle Fletcher Jenkins 
Robert Otis Jennings 
James Joseph Johnson 
George Elias Joslin 
Theodore Louis Karabelas 
Norman Luther Larson 
Pauline LeClaire 
Morris Leo Leopold 
Winston Hammond Lothrop 
Stewart Foster Lovell 
Edward James McNamara 



Course 

Educ. 

Edtic. 

Educ. 

Zoology 

Phys. Ed. 

Bus. Fund. 

H. E. I. 

Bus. Fund. 

Bus. Fund. 

Bus. Fund. 

Educ. 

Sociology 

Bus. Fund. 

Econ. 

Pre- Med. 

H. E. I. 

Sociology 

H. E. Tr. 

Sociology 

Econ. 

Bus. Fund. 

Bus. Fund. 

Sociology 

Econ. 

Sociology 

Pre- Med. 

Math. 

Sociology 

Educ. 

Econ. 

Chem. 

Sociology 

Pre- Med. 

Educ. 

H.E. 

Pre-Med. 

Bus. Fund 

Bus. Fund. 

Bus. Fund. 

246 



P. O. Address 
Groveton 
Woodsville 
Conway 
Conway 
Manchester 
Peterboro 
East Derry 
North Hampton 
Lakeport 
Wentworth 
Laconia 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Wentworth 
Manchester 
Somersworth 
Wolfeboro 
Dover 

Bellows Falls, Vt. 
Concord 
Stratham 
Dover 
Newton 

Brookline, Mass. 
Pelham 
Somersworth 
Canterbury 
Dover 
Warner 
Bradford, Vt. 
Winchester, Mass. 
Somersworth 
Spofford 
Dover 
Berlin 
Nashua 
Lisbon 
Dover 
Goffstown 
West Lebanon 



DEGREES 



Name 


Course 


P. 0. Address 


Helen Lavinia McShane 


Econ. 


Dover 


John Joseph Mara 


Pre-Med. 


Manchester 


Evelyn Alice Melendy 


H.E. 


Bedford 


Willard Everett Mooar 


Botany 


Hudson 


Miriam Andrews Nealley 


Zoology 


South Berwick, Me. 


John Francis Nelson 


Arch. 


Gloucester, Mass. 


Norbert Coyne Nodes 


Bus. Fund 


. Bergenfield, N. J. 


Arnold Frederick Noyes 


Bus. Fund 


. Sunapee 


James Diamond Osgood 


Sociology 


Pittsfield 


Isabelle Paige 


H. E. Tr. 


Weare 


Sylvester Mansfield Parshley 


Econ. 


Wolfeboro 


Cynthia Madalyn Patten 


H. E. I. 


Brookline, Mass. 


Charlotte Mildred Pearl 


H. E. Tr. 


Exeter 


Charlotte Lucy Peaslee 


H. E. Exl 


!. Reed's Ferry 


*Ruth Emery Pitcher 


H. E. Tr. 


Keene 


Hattie Frances Record 


Educ. 


East Jaffrey 


Gordon Franklin Reed 


Econ. 


Gorham 


David Dunlop Robinson 


Arch. 


Lawrence, Mass. 


Edward Isaac Rosenthal 


Pre-Med. 


Manchester 


Marion Russell 


Zoology 


Dover 


Robert Everett Sargent 


Bus. Fund 


. Franklin 


Paul Hayward Scovell 


Educ. 


Unity 


Gordon Bailey Seavey 


Econ. 


Westford, Mass. 


*Charles Arthur Sewell 


Math. 


Dover 


Richard Emery Smith 


Econ. 


Laconia 


Wilmot Haven Smith 


Arch. 


Plymouth 


Carolyn Emma Soper 


H. E. I. 


Shelbourne Falls, Mass. 


*Alice Spinney 


Sociology 


Worcester, Mass. 


Clarence Emons Sprague 


Econ. 


Concord 


Lucy Catharine Stewart 


H. E. I. 


Exeter 


Ronald Edmund Tetley 


Econ. 


Laconia 


Roger Ramsdell Thompson 


Econ^ 


Somersworth 


Ruth Eliza Thompson 


Zoology 


Hudson 


Edward Francis Tile 


Botany 


Groveton 


Rodger Milton Tolman 


Educ. 


Rochester 


Ross Vilardo 


Pre-Med. 


Garfield, N. J. 


Gardner Howard Wales 


Econ. 


Penacook 


Margaret Elizabeth Walsh 


Math. 
247 


Lexington, Mass. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Frank Emil Watts, Jr. 
Warren Gilbert Wentworth, Jr 
Marjorie Marie West 
Henry Ambrose Willey 
Louise Sherman Woodman 
Ruth Louise Woodman 
Frank George Woodward 
Harriett Frances Wyatt 

College 

Arthur Joseph Adams 
Robert Cuthbert Adams 
Edward Neil Aldrich 
Frank Clement Ames 
George Lloyd Atwood 
Willard Frederick Bean 
David Milton Beck 
Leon Eli Boodey 
George James Bowden 
Charles Anthony Bujnievicz 
Edward Parker Burnham 
Thomas Arthur Caie 
Justin Munro Clark 
Thomas William Colby 
Real DesRochers 
Theodore Elliott 
Charles Richard Fish 
*Kenneth Eugene Glidden 
Hollis Robert Goode 
Melville Stuart Hodgdon 
Edward Hamilton Hunt 
Reginald Foster Knapton 
Raymond Malcolm Knight 
Wilfred Burleigh Krabek 
**Kenneth Stacy Lane 
Joseph Walton Langford 
Daniel Joseph Lucinski 
Everett Brooks Moore 
Leon Uless Morrissette 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


Bus. Fund. 


, Maiden, Mass. 


Botany 


Dover 


Zoology 


Worcester, Mass. 


Econ. 


Durham 


Math. 


Woburn, Mass. 


Sociology 


Amesbury, Mass. 


Econ. 


Woodsville 


H. E. Tr. 


North Rochester 


of Technology (42) 


Chem. 


Somersworth 


C.E. 


Gilsum 


Chem. 


Lancaster 


C.E. 


Wilton 


I.E. 


Berlin 


C.E. 


Errol 


Arch. 


Durham 


E.E. 


Barrington 


Chem. 


Somersworth 


Chem. 


Laconia 


I.E. 


Nashua 


I.E. 


Berlin 


Chem. 


Portsmouth 


E.E. 


Haverhill, Mass. 


Chem. 


Manchester 


E.E. 


Dover 


Chem. 


East Kingston 


Chem. 


South Berwick, Me 


Chem. 


Winchester, Mass. 


E.E. 


Dover 


I.E. 


Exeter 


Arch. 


Henniker 


I.E. 


New London 


Chem. 


Dover 


C.E. 


Concord 


E.E. 


East Candia 


C.E. 


Haverhill, Mass. 


E.E. 


Keene 


E.E. 


Farmington 



248 



DEGREES 



Name 


Course 


P. 0. Address 


Albert Robert Neal 


E.E. 


Portsmouth 


Edward Arthur Necker 


I.E. 


West Norwood, N. J. 


John Lewis PhilHps 


E.E. 


Rochester 


Warren Baker Pinney 


Arch. 


Springfield, Mass. 


Herbert Briggs Reed 


M.E. 


Keene 


Francis Chadbourne Savage 


I.E. 


Groveton 


Bernard Shedd 


Chem. 


Manchester 


Robert Leslie Snodgrass 


Arch. 


Berlin 


William Albert Stocker 


Arch. 


Sunapee 


Malcolm Percival Toone 


Arch. 


West Concord 


Carl Emil Turschmann 


E.E. 


Somersworth 


Stanley Norman Vogel 


C.E. 


Manchester 


John Quincy Wendell 


E.E. 


Portsmouth 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 



College of Liberal Arts (90) 



Peter John Agrafiotis 
Margaret Baker 
Mary Haywood Barker 
Charles Edwin Batchelder 
*Elisabeth Blum Bauer 
Frederic Moore Biathrow 
Mildred Evelyn Brannen 
Marjorie Lind Britton 
Ralph Adams Brown 
John Ogden Buckley 
Gertrude Burnham 
Arthur Travers Burroughs 
Earl Francis Cahalan 
Celia Storrs Campbell 
*Martha Grace Carl 
Marian Louise Cheney 
John Revie Clark 
Esther Mary Cleveland 
Ethel Mary Collins 
Walter Woodworth Cook 
Margaret Laura Cournoyer 



Hist. 


Manchester 


Hist. 


Manchester 


Eng. 


New Castle 


Eng. 


Portsmouth 


Eng. 


Durham 


Hist. 


Hanover 


Eng. 


Durham 


Hist. 


Marlboro 


Hist. 


Concord 


Poli. Sci. 


Nashua 


Eng. 


Grafton Center 


Hist. 


Hudson 


Hist. 


West Somerville, Mass 


Eng. 


Enfield, Conn. 


Hist^ 


Schenectady, N. Y. 


Latin 


South Berwick, Maine 


Hist. 


Manchester 


French 


North Stratford 


Eng. 


Portsmouth 


Eng. 


Manchester 


French 


East Jaffrey 


249 





UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 


Course P. 0. Address 


Edward William Crawford 


Music 


Manchester 


Marjorie Agnes Dahlberg 


French 


Manchester 


Burnham Burrowes Davis 


Eng. 


Conway 


Marjorie Dillingham 


Hist. 


Somersworth 


Winona Mabel Dimock 


French 


Portsmouth 


Merial Louise Duncan 


Art 


Manchester 


Lillian Eleanora Ekstrom 


French 


Manchester 


Lyle Harlan Farrell 


Eng. 


Portland, Maine 


Leo Patrick Fitzgerald 


Hist. 


Dover 


*John Daly Fleming 


Eng. 


Flushing, N. Y. 


Richard Joseph Flynn 


Pre-Law 


Dover 


Ralph Lees Fowler 


Poli. Sci. 


Dover 


Horace Brown Francis 


French 


Manchester 


Irene Louise Gadbois 


Eng. 


Manchester 


Rober Wendell Googins 


Hist. 


Dover 


*Iva Louise Handy 


Eng. 


Keene 


Eleanor Woodward Harris 


Hist. 


Keene 


Kora Temple Harris 


Latin 


Boothbay Harbor, Maifie 


Mary Louise Haselton 


Hist. 


Manchester 


Charlotte Pauline Hirschner 


Eng. 


Amesbury, Mass. 


Ruth Frances Home 


Eng. 


Rochester 


Gerald Albion Jack 


French 


Topsham, Maine 


John Alfred Jackson 


Hist. 


Durham, Conn. 


Lloyd Charles Johnson 


Poli. Sci. 


Milford 


Walter Leslie Jones 


Poli. Sci. 


Bellows Falls, Vt. 


Raymond Joseph Joyal 


Hist. 


Somersworth 


John Thomas Kelley 


Poli. Sci. 


Nashua 


Mary Helen Kidder 


Eng. 


New London 


Paul James Kirvan 


Poli. Sci. 


Portsmouth 


Eloise Leocadie Ledoux 


French 


Nashua 


Dorothy Mae Little 


French 


Methuen, Mass. 


Julia Winter Locke 


French 


Saco, Maine 


Alice Frances McWeeney 


Ger. 


Nashua 


William Anthony Mahoney 


Eng. 


North Conway 


John Marcellus Manning 


Poli. Sci. 


Durham 


*Ella Josephine Martin 


Psych. 


Hartland, Vt. 


Marshall Edward Messenger 


Poli. Sci. 


Westmoreland 


Elizabeth Claire Moynihan 


Latin 
250 


North Walpole 



DEGREES 



Name 


Course 


P. 0. Address 


Elizabeth Louise Murdoch 


Eng. 


Manchester 


Wallace Stevens Nelson 


Poll. Sci. 


Portsmouth 


Maurice Seymour Nichols 


Pre-Law 


Henniker 


Ruth Gertrude Norris 


Latin 


Woodsville 


Gertrude Elizabeth Nye 


Eng. 


Atkinson 


♦Esther Elizabeth Otis 


Latin 


Farmington 


Ruth Beveridge Phelps 


Eng. 


Durham 


Gyneth Prew 


Eng. 


Foxboro, Mass. 


Lawrence Sargent Putnam 


Hist. 


South Lyndeboro 


Shirley Gertrude Putnam 


Eng. 


Portland, Maine 


Archie Rabinovitz 


Eng. 


Concord 


Mary Gertrude Raymond 


Latin 


Reed's Ferry 


Robert Hodgkins Reynolds 


Poll. Sci. 


Dover 


Eugene Edward Rourke 


Hist. 


Exeter 


Joseph Sandy Roy 


Psych. 


Amesbury, Mass. 


Helen Frances St. George 


Eng. 


Walpole 


Francis John Silvia 


Hist. 


Middleboro, Mass. 


Dorothy Rita Slack 


Eng. 


Stratham 


Esther Hervey Smith 


Eng. 


Dover 


Arthur Ladd Somers 


Poli. Sci. 


Gloucester, Mass. 


Leon Leslie Soule 


Poli. Sci. 


Brunswick, Maine 


Louise Amelia Sprague 


French 


Concord 


**Lewis Morgrage Stark 


Music 


Goffstown 


Robert Joseph Starke 


Eng. 


Lawrence, Mass. 


John Wilbur Tahaney 


Poli. Sci. 


Beverly, Mass. 


Julia Alice Taylor 


French 


Durham 


*Mary Elizabeth Timmins 


French 


Exeter 


John Demosthenes Valakis 


Hist. 


Manchester 


James Gray Walls 


Poli. Sci. 


Newton 


Celia Thaxter Williams 


Hist. 


New Castle 


Norman Holt Young 


Hist. 


Rochester 



* Indicates "With Honor" (average of 85 to ^90 for college course). 

** Indicates "With High Honor" (average of 90 or above for college course). 

TWO-YEAR CERTIFICATES 



College of Agriculture (6) 



Charles Warren Brown 
Howard Newton Bullock 



Hampton Falls 
Saxton^s River, Vt. 



251 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Name P. O. Address 

Karl Edward Fish Peterhoro 

Arthur Massingham Durham 

Roy George Parkhurst Colebrook 

Charles Richard Waters Hampton 



252 



PRIZES AWARDED, 1929 



BAILEY PRIZE 

Kenneth Eugene GHdden, South Berwick, Maine 

BARTLETT PRIZE 

John Henry Adams, Keene 

KATHERINE DeMERITT MEMORIAL PRIZE 

Carrie May Hopkins, Francestown 

DIETTRICH MEMORIAL CUP 

Elizabeth Margaret Ahern, Charlestown 

ERSKINE MASON MEMORLU. PRIZE 

Gertrude Elizabeth Nye, Atkinson 

HOOD ALL-ROUND ACHIEVEMENT PRIZE 

George Lloyd Atwood, Berlin 

HOOD DAIRY CATTLE JUDGING PRIZES 

Bernard Arthur Kimball, Contoocook 
Eugene Henry Seften, Bedford, Mass. 
Alonzo Robertson Gile, Tilton 

MILITARY HONOR MEDAL 

Randolph Wallace Chapman, Groveton 

AMERICAN LEGION AWARD 

Thomas William Colby, Haverhill, Mass. 

PHI MU MEDAL 
Ruth Emery Pitcher, Keene 

PHI SIGMA PRIZE 
Ruth Eliza Thompson, Nashua 

CLASS OF 1899 PRIZE 
Edward Butterfield McClenning, Westmoreland 

MASK AND DAGGER ACHIEVEMENT PRIZE 

Charlotte Pauline Hirschner, Amesbury, Mass. 

253 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

DELTA CHI ACHIEVEMENT PRIZE 

Leonard Boast Bushey, Concord 

CHI OMEGA PRIZE 

Yvette DuPaul Menard, Manchester 

ALPHA XI DELTA CUP 

Mary Elizabeth Timmins, Exeter 

ALPHA CHI OMEGA PRIZE 

Elizabeth Margaret Ahern, Char lest own 

EDWARD THOMSON FAIRCHILD PRIZES 

Paul James Kirvan, Portsmouth 

Thomas W. Colby, Haverhill, Mass. 

David Robert Campbell, Durham 

PSI LAMBDA SCHOLARSHIP CUP 

Dorothy Claire Block, North Hampton 

INTERCOLLEGIATE WRITING CONTEST 



Essays: 



First Prize — Doris H. \'ivian, Gloucester, Mass. 
Second Prize — Elizabeth M. Ahern, Charlestown 

Short Stories: 

First Prize — Elizabeth M. Ahern, Charlestown 

Poems: 

First Prize (co-winner) — Dorothy P. Duncklee, West Lebanon 



254 



STUDENTS, 1929-1930 



Abbreviations Designating Courses 
Agr. Ch. — Agricultural Chemistry 
A rch. — Architecture 
A. Ch.— Arts Chemical 
A. Cn. — Architectural Construction 
A. G. — Arts General 
Agr. — General Agriculture 
Agr. Tr.— Agriculture, Teacher Training 
A. H. — Animal Husbandry 
Bus. Fund. — Business Fundamentals 

C. E. — Civil Engineering 

Ch. E. — Chemical Engineering 

D. H. — Dairy Husbandry 

Ed. Tr.— Education, Teacher Training 
Educ. — Professional Education 

E. E. — Electrical Engineering 
Engr. — Engineering 

For. — Forestry 

H. E. D. — Home Economics, Dietitian 

H. E. I. — Home Economics, Institutional 

H. E. Tr. — Home Economics, Teacher Training 

Hort. — Horticulture 

I- E. — Industrial Engineering 

I- Tr.— Industrial, Teacher Training 

M. E. — Mechanical Engineering 

P' H. — Poultry Husbandry 

Phys. £(/.— Professional Physical Education for Women 

Pre-Law — Pre-Law 

Pre-Med.—Fre-UedicaX 



GRADUATE STUDENTS (56) 



Name 
Abbott, Harold Elliott, B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1928 
Ames, Elizabeth H., A.B. 

Mount Holyoke, 1927 
Bauer, Elizabeth Blum, B.A. 

New Hampshire, 1929 



Course 

Major Chemistry 

Major Zoology 

Major English 
Minor German 
255 



P. O. Address 
Lakeport 

Somersworth 

Durham 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Bourque, Joseph Edward, B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1929 
Breck, Mary Elizabeth, B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1929 
Daggett, Albert Frederick, B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1928 
Dearborn, Roland Balch, B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1928 
Eastwood, Medora Viola, B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1927 
Eaton, Frank Lewell, B.A, 

Oskaloosa College, 1925 
Eddy, George Norman, Th.B. 

Gordon College, 1929 
Eddy, Ruth Garland, Th.B. 

Gordon College, 1929 
Ekdahl, Hulda Elisabeth, B.A. 

Syracuse University, 1923 
Elliott, Charles Ned, B.A. 

New Hampshire, 1928 
Fox, Robert Howard, B.A. 

Ohio State, 1929 
Fritz, James Clarence, B.S. 

Penn State, 1929 

Fuller, John McElroy, B.S. 
Iowa State, 1911 

Fussell, Clyde Greenleaf, B.A. 

Middlebury, 1925 
Geremonty, Francis Howard, 
B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1925 
Googins, Robert Wendell, B.A. 

New Hampshire, 1929 
Gordon, Philip Augustine, Th.B. 

Gordon College, 1928 
Guptill, George Herbert, B.A. 

New Hampshire, 1928 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


Major Zoology 


Somersworth 


Minor Chemistry 




Major Home Econ. Tr. 


Windsor, Vt. 


Major Chemistry 


Concord 


Minor Mathematics 




Major Horticulture 


New Boston 


Minor A gr. Chemistry 




Major Home Econ. Inst. 


Plymouth, 




Mass. 


Major Education 


Wells, Maine 


Major Sociology 


Durham 


Minor Psychology 




Major Sociology 


Durham 


Minor Psychology 




Major Education 


Nashua 


Minor History 




Major History 


Contoocook 


Minor English 




Major Entomology 


Dayton, Ohio 


Minor Botany 




Major Agr. and Bio. 


Berlin, Penn. 


Chem. 




Minor Zoology 




Major Dairy 


Durham 


Husbandry 




Minor Economics 




Major Education 


Whitefield 


Major Political Science 


Manchester 


Minor History 




Major Education 


Dover 


Minor History 




Major Philosophy 


Groveland, 


Minor History 


Mass. 


Major Political Science 


Raymond 


Minor History 




256 





GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Course 

Major Education 



Major Agr. Economics 
Minor Statistics 
Major History 
Minor Education 
Major Chemistry 
Minor Mathematics 



Name 
Hill, Bernice Mary, B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1923 
Hoitt, Samuel Waldo, B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1928 
Joyal, Raymond Joseph, B.A. 

New Hampshire, 1929 
Krabek, Wilfred Burleigh, B.S 

New Hampshire, 1929 
Landelius, Conrad Goethe E., Th.B. Major Sociology 

Gordon College, 1928 Minor Phil, and 

Psychology 
Lane, Walter Eben, B.A. Major Education 

Bates College, 1912 
Lowry, Mrs. Doris Gallup, B.S. Major English 

Simmons College, 1923 Minor History 

McKelvey, IsabelleW'ilder, B.A. Major Education 

Wheaton College, 1921 
Martin, Josephine Ella, B.A. Major Psychology 

New Hampshire, 1929 Minor Zoology 

Morrison, Leonard Samuel, B.S. Major Education 

New Hampshire, 1910 
Murphy, Anna Dorothy, B.A 

Boston University, 1929 
Murray, Harry Lee, B.S. 

University of Maine, 1929 



Major French 
Minor English 
Major Botany 



Nulsen, William B., B.S. 

Calif. Inst, of Technology, 1918 
Nye, Gertrude Elizabeth, B.A. 

New Hampshire, 1929 
Parkinson, Everton Harry, B.A. 

Wesleyan, 1926 
Pease, Perley Henry, B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1926 
Pickett, Thomas Austin, B.S. 

Mass. Agr. Coll., 1928 

Putnam, Shirley Gertrude, B.A. 
New Hampshire, 1929 



Major Mathematics 
Minor E. E. 
Major English 
Minor French 
Major Education 

Major Education 

Major Agr. and Bio. 

Chem. 
Minor Chemistry 
Major English 
Minor Education 

257 



P. O. Address 
Center Straf- 
ford 
Durham 

Somersworth 

Dover 

Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

North Ber- 
wick, Me. 
Durham 

Whitefield 

Hartland, Vt. 

Whitefield 

Springfield, 

Vt. 
Hampden 
Highlands^ 

Maine 
Durham 

Westville 

Whitefield 

Meredith 

Beverly, 

Mass. 
Portland, 
Maine 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name Course 

Rasmussen, Edwin John, B.S., M.S. Major Horticulture 

Univ. of Wisconsin, 1927 Minor Botany 

Redden, Elizabeth Adelaide, B.A. Major Sociology 



Minor Education 
Major Zoology 
Minor Chemistry 
Major English 
Minor Education 
Major Mathematics 
Minor Education 
Major Zoology 



New Hampshire, 1928 
Rosenthal, Edward Isaac, B.S 

New Hampshire, 1929 
Scott, R. Beatrice, B.A. 

Wellesley College, 1913 
Sewell, Charles Arthur, B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1929 
Smith, Charlotte Marie, B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1927 
Stark, Lewis Morgrage, B.A. 

New Hampshire, 1929 
Swain, Howard Eugene, B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1916 
Tepper, Albert Edward, B.S. 

Penn State, 1928 
Thompson, Ruth Eliza, B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1929 
Tyler, Kenneth Ellsworth, B.S. Major Education 

Tufts, 1922 
Walker, Carl Ernest, B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1929 
Watson, Alice Louise, B.S. 

New Hampshire, 1928 
Wellman, Mrs. Blanche Walker, 

B.A. Major Education 

Colby College, 1898 

New Hampshire, M.A , 1928 
Weston, Helen Brown, B.S. Major Education 

New Hampshire, 1917 
Woodman, Louise Sherman, B.S. Major Education 

New Hampshire, 1929 
Wright, Murray Johnson, B.A. Major Education 

Dartmouth, 1926 



Major English 
Minor History 
Major Education 

Major P. H. 
Mi7ior Agric. Ecofiomics 
Major Zoology 
Minor Bota7iy 



Major Forestry 
Minor Botany 
Major Agric. Chemistry 
Minor Education 



P. O. Address 
Durham 

Dover 

Manchester 

Wolfeboro 

Dover 

Dover 

Goffstown 

Exeter 

Ridley Park, 

Pa. 
Nashua 

Hampton 

Contoocook 

Durham 

Durham 

Whitefield 

Woburn, 
Mass. 
Alton 



258 



Name 
Abbiati, Flora Regina 
Adams, John Henry 
Adams, Robert Wallace 
Adams, Watson Clark 
Agranovitch, Edward Irving 
Ahem, Elizabeth Margaret 
Allan, Philip Farley 
Allen, William Henry 
Allsworth, Clayton Reed 
Amsden, Hope Adelaide 
Andrews, Muriel Elizabeth 
Annett, Dorothy Adaline 
Annon, Roberta Charlotte 
Arren, John Francis 
Atwood, Bryce Olding 
Atwood, Elizabeth 
Atwood, Marjorie Alice 
Averka, Peter Charles 
Bachelder, Harvey Lloyd 
Bailey, John Weston 
Baker, Chester Aloysius 
Baldwin, HoUis Walter 
Ball, Beverley Winniette 
Ball, Wilma Frances 
Ballard, Robert Oilman 
Bannon, Loretta Marie 
Barnes, Ernest Edward 
Bartlett, Benjamin Thomas, Jr 
Bartlett, Fremont Dayton 
Barton, Charles Aimer 
Barton, Roger Freeman 
Batchelder, Earl Boyce 
Bernaby, Helen Florence 
Bianchi, Charles Francis 
Blaisdell, Paul Henry 
Blake, Arnold Clark 
Blakey, Bernard Edward 
Blodgett, Parker McKay 



SENIORS 




SENIORS (341) 




Course 


P. 0. Address 


A. G. 


Milford 


A.G. 


Keene 


E.E. 


Pittsfield 


E.E. 


Exeter 


g Pre-Law 


Colchester, Conn. 


A.G. 


Charlestown 


A.G. 


West Lebanon 


A.G. 


Conway Center 


A.G. 


Branford, Conn. 


A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Somersworth 


A.G. 


Rollinsford 


A.G. 


Manchester 


E.E. 


Manchester 


E.E. 


Manchester 


H. E. I. 


Pelham 


Educ. 


Pelham 


A.G. 


Lawrence, Mass. 


Bus. Fund 


. Concord 


M.E. 


West Newbury, Mass. 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Colebrook 


For. 


Manchester 


A. G. 


Lancaster 


E.E. 


Penacook 


A.G. 


Laconia 


Agr. Tr. 


Mason 


, Jr. A.G. 


Berry Village 


A.G. 


Berlin 


M.E. 


Newmarket 


A.G. 


Groveton 


Bus. Fund 


Manchester 


H. E. Ext. 


Fremont 


A.G. 


Worcester, Mass. 


A.G. 


Concord 


M.E. 


Hill 


Bus. Fund 


. Peterborough 


Agr. Tr. 


Kensington 


259 





UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Bodge, Dorothy Kendall 
Boulanger, Edmee Adeline 
Boyles, Abbott Webster 
Brien, George Edward 
Brierley, Jean 
Bronson, Hazel Ruggles 
Brooks, Mabel 
Brown, Daniel Adams 
Brown, Ruth Margaret 
Brunei, Sara Louise 
Buckley, Anna Kathryn 
Bunker, Ruth Eleanor 
Burnham, Florence Ethel 
Burnham, Gertrude Mary 
Butterfield, Kenneth Parmenter 
Call, Arthur Joseph, Jr. 
Callahan, Millicent Eda 
Calnan, Beatrice Brennan 
Castle, Mildred Frances 
Chapman, Bernard Fulton 
Chase, Clayton Warren 
Chellis, Margaret Louise 
Churchill, Edith Mary 
Churchill, Randolph Emerson 
Clark, Beatrice Ethel 
Clark, Jesse Keyes 
Clement, William George 
Cleveland, Harlan Samuel 
Clifford, Alene Estelle 
Cohen, Sophie Adella 
Colby, Halstead Norman 
Collins, Arthur Bailey, Jr. 
Connor, Lester Earl 
Cooper, Bradley Marshall 
Cooper, Robert Folsom 
Couser, Thomas Clifford 
Crowley, James William 
Crowther, Stephen Thomas 
Cummings, Mary Louisa 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


A. G. 


Rochester 


A.G. 


Dover 


E.E. 


Chester 


M.E. 


Springvale, Maine 


A.G. 


Lawrence, Mass. 


A.G. 


Claremont 


Phys. Ed. 


Hampton 


A.H. 


Rowley, Mass. 


A. G. 


Deerfield 


A.G. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Kingston 


A. G. 


Kittery, Maine 


A.G. 


Grafton Center 


For. 


Antrim 


A.G. 


Exeter 


H. E. Tr. 


Enfield 


Educ. 


Manchester 


A. G. 


Laconia 


A.G. 


Groveton 


C.E. 


Milford 


A.G. 


Kezar Fc^lls, Maine 


A. G. 


Raymond 


A. G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Dover 


E.E. 


Charlestown 


A.G. 


Laconia 


A.G. 


North Stratford 


Educ. 


Conway 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


I.E. 


Concord 


For. 


Hampton 


A.H. 


Henniker 


M. E. 


Lincoln 


Bus. Fund. 


Exeter 


Bus. Fund. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Rockland, Mass. 


Educ. 


Derry Village 


A.G. 


Colebrook 


260 





SENIORS 



Name 
Cummings, Merlyn Arthur 
Currier, Edna Louise 
Dacey, Joseph James 
Daigle, Rene Maurice 
Damon, Mazzios 
Dauphinee, Gertrude Chapman 
Davis, Alice Lillian 
Dawson, George Romans 
DeCourcy, John Henry 
Dickinson, Louise Anna 
Donnelly, John Joseph 
Dow, Lena May 
DuBois, William Haskell 
Duncklee, Dorothy Page 
Dunlap, Lloyd Walter 
Duquette, Henry Benjamin 
Durgin, Evangeline 
Durgin, Roslyn Caverly 
Dustin, Frank Carleton 
Dwyre, Katherine Claire 
Eastham, Alice Scott 
Eastwood, Eric 
Ellis, Clifford Weston 
Eugley, Arthur Reddington, Jr. 
Evans, John Beecher 
Farley, Ellen Josephine 
Farnsworth, Hugh McLellan 
Farrand, Katherine Louise 
Files, Bertrand Colby 
Fitzgerald, John Thomas 
Fitzgerald, Richard A. 
Flanigan, Justin Edward 
Flayhan, Alfred Charles 
Ford, Arthur Leonard Dunning 
Fosburgh, David Lionel 
Frame, Marion Ellen 
French, Harold Taylor 
Frye, Gilman Virgin 
Fuller, Henry Ellsworth 



Course 
M.E. 
A.G. 
A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 
Bus. Fund. 
A. G. 
A. G. 
A. G. 
A. G. 
A. G. 
E.E. 
H. E. I. 
Bus. Fund. 
A.G. 
Educ. 
E.E. 
A.G. 
Agr. 
C.E. 
A. G. 
A. G. 

Bus. Fund. 
Bus. Fund. 
Educ. 
For. 
A. G. 
A. G. 
A.G. 
E.E. 
A.G. 
A.G. 
A.G. 
A.G. ^ 
A. G. 
C.E. 
A. G. 
A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 
E.E. 
261 



P. O. Address 

Alton 

Salisbury, Mass. 

Kingston 

Manchester 

Exeter 

Amesbury, Mass. 

Fremont 

Plymouth 

Manchester 

Rochester 

Dover 

North Hampton 

Concord 

West Lebanon 

Laconia 

Penacook 

Newmarket 

Newmarket 

Penacook 

Canaan 

Portsmouth 

Lynn, Mass. 

Nashua ■ 

Exeter 

North Stratford 

Adams, Mass. 

Portland, Maine 

Berlin 

Meredith 

Milford 

Manchester * 

Portsmouth 

Dover 

Exeter 

Manchester 

Center Barnstead 

Exeter 

Franklin 

Nashua 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Gaffield, Alice Louise 
Gardner, Frederick deWitt 
Gee, Warren Herbert 
George, Howard Wakeman 
Gienty, Edward Kenneth 
Gile, Alonzo Robertson 
Gillette, Charles Welcome 
Glazier, Phyllis 
Gleason, Margaret Elizabeth 
Goodwin, Crystal Evelyn 
Googins, Danforth IMerton 
Gray, Gertrude 
Grenier, Jacques Lionel 
Grenier, Jean Donat 
Griffin, Eliza Caroline 
Gulliver, Reginald Everett 
Gulumian, Hrant Garabed 
Guston, Gustaf David 
Hadley, George Langdon 
Hall, James Henry 
Hall, Herbert Lorenzo 
Ham, Winifred Priscilla 
Hammond, William Lawrence 
Hampson, Louise Edith 
Hanley, James Anthony 
Hare, Georgianna Watson 
Harriman, Donald Ray 
Hartford, Lenora Lienor 
Hartford, Rachel Eva 
Hartshorn, George Main 
Harwood, Kate Marion 
Hayes, Maxwell Connary 
Hennessey, Thomas Edward 
Hill, Bertha Pauline 
Hills, Florence 
Hobbs, Paul W^esley 
Hobson, Dorothy May 
Hodgdon, Albion Reed 
Hodgdon, Marvis Blanche 



Course 

A.G. 

A.G. 

M.E. 

Bus. Fund. 

C.E. 

D.H. 

I.E. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

E.E. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 

A.G. 

Educ. 

M.E. 

Arch. 

Pre-Law 

A.G. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

E.E. 

A. Ch. 

A. G. 

H. E. Tr. 

Educ. 

H. E. I. 

A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 

A. G. 

I.E. 

A.G. 

H. E. I. 

A.G. 

Agr. 

A. G. 

A. C. 

A. G. 

262 



P. O. Address 

Bradford, Vt. 

Portsmouth 

Winchester 

Manchester 

Warner 

Tilton 

Nashua 

Salem Center 

Derry 

Dover 

Kennebunk, Maine 

Whitefield 
Manchester 

Manchester 

East Granby, Conn. 

Needham, Mass. 

Penacook 

Brockton, Mass. 

Manchester 

Warner 

Plymouth 

Manchester 

Manchester 

Littleton 

Franklin 

Amherst 

A shland 

Tilton 

Derry 

Barns tead 

Nashua 

Lincoln 

Somersworth 

Manchester 

Nashua 

North Hampton 

Gorham 

Dover 
Rochester 



SENIORS 




Name 


Course 


P. 0. Address 


Holt, Ralph Davis 


M.E. 


Nashua 


Hopkins, Carrie May 


A.G. 


Francestown 


Hounsell, William Booth 


A.G. 


Conway 


Houston, Norman Johnson 


I.E. 


Bath 


Howe, Martha Whittier 


H. E. I. 


Portland, Maine 


Howell, Harold Alton 


For. 


Dover 


Hunt, Stanley Elwyn 


Agr. Ch. 


Lakeport 


Huntoon, Alonzo Herbert 


Agr. Tr. 


Derry 


Hyde, Gerald Randolph 


For. 


Goffstown 


Jackson, Clarence E. 


Bus. Fund 


I. Lebanon 


Jackson, James Matthew 


Pre-Law 


Dover 


Johnson, Dorothy Preston 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Johnson, Fred Arnold 


Arch. 


Berlin 


Johnson, Ralph Roscoe 


Pre- Med. 


Hampton 


Jones, Dorothy Eleanor 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Kellam, David Bean 


Ch.E. 


North Conway 


Kemp, Wyman Foster 


Ch.E. 


Portland, Maine 


Kendall, Elizabeth Parker 


H. E. I. 


Manchester 


Kidder, Mary Helen 


A.G. 


New London 


Kimball, Russell Gibbs 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


King, Anna Julia 


A.G. 


North Walpole 


Kirk, John Kenneth 


A. Ch. 


Manchester 


Kushious, Anna Hyla 


A. G. 


Portsmouth 


Lamb, Joseph Lane 


Ch.E. 


Portsmouth 


Lanouette, Jessie Corinne 


A.G. 


Somersworth 


Larrabee, Julia Lucretia 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Lassell, Mary Bessom 


H. E. I. 


Newmarket 


Lockwood, Grace Florence 


A. G. 


Dover 


Lord, Florence Madeline 


A.G. 


Conway 


Low, Winifred 


A. G. 


Derry 


Luce, Hazel Ruth 


A.G. 


Exeter 


Lundstrom, Edith Olivia 


A. G. 


Worcester, Mass. 


Lyford, Walter Henry, Jr. 


Ch. E. ^ 


Epping 


McCann, James Philip 


A. G. 


Dover 


McCooey, Daniel Farley 


Pre- Med. 


Dover 


McDanolds, Margaret Roe 


A.G. 


North Haverhill 


MacDonald, Raymond Francis 


A. G. 


Peterborough 


McFarland, Donald Jackman 


A.G. 


Concord 


McGrail, Marie Jeannette 


A.G. 
263 


Dover 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Mcintosh, Sheldon Weeks 
McLeod, John Kenneth 
Marsh, Morris Raymond 
Marston, Evelyn Ellen 
Martoski, Stanley John 
Mason, Walter Stocks 
Mattoon, Gertrude Beckler 
Maynard, Helen Gertrude 
Meader, Faith 
Michaud, Albert Jenness 
Miller, Paulyn Robin 
Minah, Theodore Warren 
Mitchell, Alta Doris 
Monat, Urgel Alcide 
Moran, Phyllis Marguerite 
Morin, Aline Lydia 
Morton, Paul Fillmore 
Muchmore, Arthur Sherman 
Muggleston, Harold William 
Mulcahy, Edmund Justin 
Nason, Dorothy Ellsworth 
Nealley, Miriam Andrews 
Nelson, John Francis 
Nelson, William J. 
Nudd, Philip 
O'Brien, Margaret Helen 
Palmer, Gordon Franklin 
Paolino, Pasquale 
Paradis, Doris \'iola 
Parker, Clifford Addison 
Parks, Philip Edwin 
Patch, Lloyd Gilman 
Patenaude, Merle Roscoe 
Peabody, Ethel Capitolia 
Pearson, Dorothy 
Pearson, Marion Eva 
Pederson, Ernest Otto 
Pelkey, Mildred Cecelia 
Perkins, Daniel Nahum 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Pre- Med. 


Concord 


M.E. 


Gonic 


A.G. 


Ashland 


A.G. 


Adams, Mass. 


P.H. 


Canohie Lake 


Educ. 


Colebrook 


A.G. 


Concord 


Educ. 


Gonic 


Bus. Fund 


. Gorham 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


Bus. Fund 


. Nashua 


H. E. I. 


Bristol 


For. 


Durham 


A.G. 


Somersworth 


A. G. 


Berlin 


E.E. 


Portland, Maine 


D.H. 


North Woodstock 


A. G. 


Rochester 


Educ. 


North Walpole 


A.G. 


Dover 


A. G. 


South Berwick, Maine 


Arch. 


Gloucester, Mass. 


A.G. 


Quincy, Mass. 


E.E. 


Hampton 


A. G. . 


Maiden, Mass. 


A.G. 


Moultonhoro 


A.G. 


Lawrence, Mass. 


A.G. 


Somersworth 


Agr. Tr. 


Exeter 


A. G. 


Bradford, Mass. 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


C.E. 


Henniker 


H.E. 


Peterborough 


Educ. 


Stratham 


A.G. 


Brookline, Mass. 


A.G. 


Berlin 


A.G. 


Peterborough 


A.G. 


Dover 


264 





Name 
Perkins, Ernest Marshall 
Perreault, Raymond Richard 
Petazzi, Leona Louise 
Pettee, Fred Cristy 
Pickwick, Madeline 
Pike, Mary Currier 
Pinkham, Marcia Winter 
Powers, Samuel Eugene 
Priest, Leona Frances 
Prince, George Howard 
Prince, William Lawton 
Purinton, Walter George 
Putnam, Ida Lydia 
Quimby, Cedric Dean 
Randall, George William 
Reed, Ethel Minnie 
Reed, Gilbert Hood 
Reinhart, Alvin Richard 
Richard, Heloise Elsie 
Robinson, Kenneth Heaton 
Rogers, Frank Alna, Jr. 
Ronald, James Andrew 
Rowe, Marjorie Pauline 
Rundlett, Harold Goodsoe 
Sacco, Mctor 
Sanborn, Forrest John 
Savory, Emily Elizabeth 
Sawyer, Hollis Freeman 
Sawyer, Leon Randolph 
Sawyer, Ray Stillman 
Scamporino, Vincent James 
Schwartz, Louis 
Scott, Harold Samuel 
Scovell, Paul Hay ward 
Scripture, Paul Newcomb 
Sewell, Dorothy Augusta 
Shea, John Robert 
Sheehan, Eleanor Lucy 
Shepard, Harriett Eleanor 



SENIORS 




Course 


P. 0. Address 


Bus. Fund. 


East Kingston 


Pre-Med. 


Rochester 


A.G. 


Milford 


Bus. Fund. 


Francestown 


H. E. I. 


Manchester 


Phys. Ed. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Portland, Maine 


Bus. Fund. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Newmarket 


A.G. 


New Boston 


A.G. 


Dorchester, Mass 


C.E. 


Raymond 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Ch.E. 


Claremont 


Educ. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Claremont 


A.G. 


Braintree, Mass. 


I.E. 


Medfield, Mass. 


A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Keene 


A.G. 


Franklin 


A.G. 


Atlantic, Mass. 


A.G. 


Concord 


Arch. 


Exeter 


Arch. 


Portsmouth 


A. Ch. 


Laconia 


H. E. Tr. 


Warner 


A.G. 


Groveton 


C.E. 


South Danbury 


Bus. Fund. 


Manchester 


Pre-Law 


Salem Center 


A. G. 


Portsmouth 


Bus. Fund. 


Milford 


Educ. 


Haverhill, Mass. 


Agr. Ch. 


Surry 


A.G. 


Dover 


A. G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Bedford 


265 





UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Shepard, Paul Benjamin 
Simonds, Gardner William 
Sirhakis, Nicholas William 
Small, John Albert 
Smith, Edward Swan 
Smith, Grace Edith 
Smith, Harold William 
Smith, Harry Russell, Jr. 
Smith, Henry Mat hew 
Smith, Marion Edith 
Smith, Pauline Leavitt 
Smith, Raymond Elmer 
Southmayd, Elwyn Harold 
Stevens, Isabelle 
Stevens, Jesse John 
Stewart, Thomas Armour 
Stolovsky, Louis 
Stolworthy, Ruth Helen 
Stone, Edith Louise 
Stoughton, Roy Leslie 
Sutton, John Pitkin 
Sylvestre, Naomi Rosana 
Szlosek, Stanley Francis 
Szuch, Alec Michael 
Tapscott, Raymond Thomas 
Tarr, Dorothy Elizabeth 
Tarr, Forace Austin, Jr. 
Taylor, Alfred Henry 
Terry, Joseph Church 
Tinker, James Foster 
Todd, Catherine Alberta 
Tomasian, Thomas 
Tounge, Harry Goodwin, Jr. 
Towle, Ruth Celia 
Truell, Harold Arthur 
Tucker, Francis Pearce 
Tufts, Oliver Augustus, Jr. 
Twombly, Gertrude Messenger 
Vachon, Edmond Joseph 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


A.G. 


New London 


A. G. 


Manchester 


I.E. 


Somersworth 


Bus. Fund. 


Nashua 


Arch. 


Charlestown 


A.G. 


Goffstown 


E.E. 


Rochester 


Pre-Law 


Dover 


M.E. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Lakeport 


A.G. 


North Hampton 


A.G. 


Dover 


Pre-Law 


Franklin 


A.G. 


Hyde Park, Mass. 


A.G. 


Whitefield 


A.G. 


Derry 


Pre-Law 


Lebanon 


A. G. 


Durham 


A.G. 


Dover 


Ch.E. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Colebrook 


H.E. 


Littleton 


M.E. 


Nashua 


Ch.E. 


North Walpole 


M.E. 


Somersworth 


A.G. 


North Hampton 


M.E. 


North Hampton 


Ch.E. 


Pearl River, N. Y. 


M.E. 


Fall River, Mass. 


E.E. 


Manchester 


Educ. 


New London 


M.E. 


Nashua 


Pre- Med. 


Wakefield, Mass. 


A.G. 


Conway 


A.G. 


Newport 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Lancaster 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Dover 


266 







SENIORS 




Name 


Course 


P. 0. Address 


Vatcher, George Irving 


E.E. 


Hancock 


Vaughan, Evelyn Frances 


A.G. 


Groveland, Mass. 


Vaughan, Mary Eleanor 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Vogel, Helen Frances 


H. E. Tr. 


Manchester 


Waite, John Herrick 


A.H. 


Peterborough 


Wallace, Douglas Murray 


A.G. 


Tilton 


Walsh, Marguerite Elizabeth 


A. G. 


Lexington, Mass. 


Watson, Ethel Mary 


A.G. 


Candia 


Watson, George Wilder 


A.H. 


Durham 


Weast, Florence lola 


A.G.^ 


Contoocook 


Webster, David Brinton 


A.G. 


Hudson 


Webster, Russell Goodwin 


A. G. 


South Berwick, Maine 


Wendelin, Carl Gustav 


A. G. 


Concord 


Wettergreen, John Adams 


C.E. 


Maiden, Mass. 


Wheeler, Kenneth Eugene 


E.E. 


New London 


White, Grace Milton 


A.G. 


Concord 


Whittemore, John Kenneth 


Agr. Tr. 


Londonderry 


Wilder, William Wallace 


Educ. 


Newton 


Wile, Lester Milton 


A. G. 


Winthrop, Mass. 


Williams, Celia Thaxter 


A. G. 


Newcastle 


Wilson, Eunice Maude 


A. G. 


Milan 


Withington, George Wesley 


E.E. 


Penacook 


Wolf, Edward Isreal 


Bus. Fund 


. Milford 


Wood, Winchester Ridout 


E.E. 


Lebanon 


Woodward, Charles Philip 


Bus. Fund 


. Milford 


Wright, Lawrence Whitney 


M.E. 


Keene 


Wright, Stanley William 


A.G. 


Rochester 


Yeaton, Rose Dearborn 


A.G. 


Tilton 


Youland, Zelma Ruth 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Young, Louise Shackford 


A.G. 


Dover 


JUNIORS (335) 




Name 


Course 


P. 0. Address 


Adams, Earl Marshall 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Aldrich, Lucien Brainerd 


C.E. 


Keene 


Alexander, Thomas Branch 


Ch.E. 


Newport 


Allan, Richard Kent 


Bus. Fund 


. West Lebanon 


Annis, Mary Coding 


Educ. 


Londonderry 


Austin, George Fred 


E.E. 


Manchester 



267 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Baer, Adolph Jacob 
Bagley, Clifford Howard 
Bagley, Gerald Ransom 
Ballou, Laurence Frank 
Barrett, Hildah Eda 
Barron, Ralph Ernest 
Barton, Carlton Claudius 
Bean, Rachel Winnifred 
Beede, Marcelia Louise 
Bergquist, Marion Elizabeth 
Berry, Donald Fiske 
Billman, Kathryn Luella 
Black, Fannie 
Blair, Jeanette Moore 
Blanchard, Emery Caswell 
Blount, Wayne Lawrence 
Boardman, William Dana 
Bodwell, Frances Louisa 
Boothroyd, Kenneth Ingham 
Bouchard, Lucien George 
Bournival, Emile Ernest 
Bowker, Marshall Edward 
Boyd, Earl James 
Brennan, Eleanor Teresa 
Brennan, Thomas Joseph 
Brierley, Frances 
Bromley, Edward Daniel 
Brooks, Charles Hussey 
Brown, Donald Mason 
Brown, Mary Emma 
Brown, Wilfred Ernest 
Brungot, Clarence Jorgen 
Bryant, Floyd Goodwin 
Buckminster, Kenneth Bridge 
Burdett, Keith Franklyn 
Burleigh, Austin Holmes 
Bushey, Leonard Boast 
Butman, Clarence Dana 
Butson, Ernest Henry 



Course 
Bus. Fund. 
Bus. Fund. 
Hort. 
E.E. 
A. G. 
Pre-Law 
Agr. Tr. 
A.G. 
Educ. 
A. G. 
Pre-Law 
A. G. 
A. G. 
A.G. 
Educ. 
M.E. 
Bus. Fund. 
A. G. 
C.E. 
Pre- Med. 
Bus. Fund. 
E.E. 
M. E. 
Phys. Ed. 
Bus. Fund. 
A. G. 
A. G. 
A.G. 

Bus. Fu7id. 
A. G. 
M.E. 
M.E. 
A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 
Bus. Fund. 
M.E. 
M.E. 
Bus. Fund. 
Bus. Fund. 

268 



P. O. Address 

Dover 

Amesbury, Mass. 

Lebanon 

Troy 

Lisbon 

Worcester, Mass. 

Newport 

Errol 

Campion 

Manchester 

New Boston 

Wollaston, Mass. 

Portsmouth 

Peterborough 

Meredith 

Littleton 

Everett, Mass. 

Rochester 

Woodsville 

Nashua 

Manchester 

Kittery, Maine 

North Hampton 

Dover 

Dover 

Lawrence, Mass. 

Lebanon 

Dover 

Milford 

Deer field 

Manchester 

Berlin 

Tilton 

Concord 

Swampscott, Mass. 

Tavares, Fla. 

Concord 

Lebanon {West) 

Lisbon 



Name 


Course 


P. 0. Address 


Campana, Fiore 


A. G. 


Franklin 


Carlen, Jans Julius 


E.E, 


Concord 


Carlton, Leslie Herbert 


A.G. 


Fremont 


Carr, Dorothy June 


A. G. 


Hill 


Carville, Rose Frances 


A. G. 


Dover 


Casey, James Patrick 


A. G. 


Somersworth 


Cassily, Elizabeth Frances 


A. C. 


Dover 


Charron, Roland Bartholomew 


Pre-Med. 


Nashua 


Chase, Leslie Oliver 


A.G. 


Milton 


Cheetham, Tom 


Ch.E. 


Nashua 


Christensen, Harry Edward 


Pre-Med. 


Gloucester, Mass, 


Christie, Aldis 


For. 


Groveton 


Christopher, Esther Webster 


H.E. 


South Lyndehoro 


Cilley, Barbara Louise 


A. G. 


Kingston 


Cilley, Charles Dorr 


A.G. 


Dover 


Clapp, Kenneth Turner 


Bus. Fund. 


Hampton 


Clark, William Edward 


M.E. 


Charlestown 


Clarner, Louis George Karl 


A. G. 


Concord 


Colburn, George Clement 


A.G. 


Newton, Mass. 


Cold well, Harry Irving 


E.E. 


Goff's Falls 


Connor, Margaret Elizabeth 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Cook, George Milton 


A. G. 


New Bedford, Mass. 


Corson, Hazel 


A.G. 


Rochester 


Corson, Hilda 


A.G. 


Rochester 


Cressy, Muriel Gladys 


A.G. 


Concord 


Crocker, Robert Wellington 


E.E. 


Rochester 


Crosby, Ralph William 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Croteau, Oscar Frederick 


A.G. 


Marlboro 


Cunningham, Horace James 


E.E. 


Berlin 


Currier, Fred Leslie 


A. G. 


Pittsfield, Mass, 


Gushing, Merchant LeRoy 


Ch.E. 


Plaistow 


Daggett, Helen Eaton 


A.G. 


Concord 


Danforth, Mildred Emeline 


A.G. 


Berwick, Maine 


Daniels, Almon Meikle 


P.H.^ 


Henniker 


Davis, Henry Albert 


Agr. Ch. 


East Sullivan 


Davis, Ruth Elenore 


A.G. 


Needham, Mass. 


Dean, Rexford Stanley 


A.G. 


Durham 


Delude, Frederick Edward 


Ch.E. 


Keene 


Dick, Arthur Freeman 


E.E. 
269 


Wilton 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Dickey, Frank Wallace 
Dodge, Thelma Louise 
Donovan, Jeremiah Joseph 
Douglas, Howard William 
Dowd, Henry Hubert 
Downing, Charles Jackson 
Dresser, Holland Lamb 
Dubuc, Maurice Henry 
Dunlap, Kenneth Roberts 
Edwards, Evan Jonathan 
Ellingwood, Daniel Milton 
Engel, Fiesco Byron 
Ennis, Joseph John 
Evans, Carl Buntin 
Faber, David 
Fay, Charles Robert 
Fearer, Joseph Leonard 
Fenton, Austen Wells 
Fish, Joseph Theodore 
Fisher, Vernon Hoitt 
Fleischman, Bessie 
Flower, Eugene Haskell 
Fowler, Jewett Wilcox 
Freaman, Sadie 
Galeucia, Anna Joy 
Gates, Elizabeth Aldine 
Gaunt, Nelson 
Gay, Richard Lewis 
Gleason, Eleanor 
Googins, Herbert Russell 
Gordon, Florence Rosamond 
Go wen, Elizabeth 
Granville, Pearle 
Greenwood, Earle Spencer 
Griffin, Eleanor Frances 
Grinnell, Victoria Louisa 
Guptill, Leroy A. 
Guy, John Timothy 
Hagerty, Edward Daniel 



Course 

E.E. 

A. G. 

A. G. 

A.G. 

Arch. 

C.E. 

A. G. 

For. 

A. G. 

C.E. 

A. G. 

M. E. 

For. 

E. E. 

Pre- Med. 

E.E. 

M.E. 

A.G. 

C.E. 

Ch.E. 

A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 

M.E. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

A. G. 

A. G. 

Bus. Fund. 

Phys. Ed. 

Bus. Fund. 

A. G. 

A.G. 

H.E. 

Bus. Fund. 

A.G. 

H.E. 

Agr. Tr. 

Pre-Med. 

Pre- Med. 

270 



P. O. Address 

Manchester 

North Hampton 

Exeter 

Brattleboro, Vt. 

Nashua 

Wentworth 

South Portland, Maine 

Nashua 

Laconia 

Manchester 

Littleton 

Penacook 

Arlington, Mass. 

Concord 

Nashua 

Keene 

Hampton 

Wrentham, Mass. 

East Kingston 

Andover 

Portsmouth 

Manchester 

Concord 

Dover 

Alton 

Charlestown 

Worcester, Mass. 

Keene 

Dublin 

Portsmouth 

Manchester 

Greenland 

Madison 

Goffstown 

Portsmouth 

Derry 

Northwood Ridge 

Somersworth 

Nashua 



JUNIORS 



Name 
Hagstrom, Herbert Roger 
Hale, Ruth Frances 
Hall, Marjorie Louise 
Ham, Carlton Wilfred 
Hanna, Charles Russell 
Harrington, Richard Morgan 
Haseltine, Edward John 
Hasiotis, Arthur Chrlstos 
Haskell, Genevieve Mary 
Hazen, Catherine Alice 
Hazen, Henry Allen 
Henning, Avis Mary 
Higgins, Paul William 
Hikel, Theodore Roosevelt 
Hill, Richard Oscar 
Hills, Dorothy Childs 
Horan, George Christopher 
Horrigan, Frank Henry 
Hoyt, Stanley Currier 
Huse, Evelyn Adelaide 
Ingham, George Donald 
Jablonowski, Joseph Francis 
Jackson, Mildred Lois 
Jenkins, Walter Scott 
Johnson, Irving Ernest 
Jones, Frank Malcolm 
Kelley, Genevieve May 
Kellstrand, Gunnar Edwin 
Kelly, Henry Edward 
Kimball, Bernard Arthur 
Kirkpatrick, Ilda Billings 
Krinsky, Abraham Eben 
LaFarge, William Francis 
Lamb, Wilfrid Thomas 
Lambert, Alfred Anselm 
Lamprey, Anna Signor 
Lane, Henry Chester 
Lane, Kenneth Bradley 
Lang, Harry Frank 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


A.G. 


Worcester, Mass. 


H.E. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Dover 


D.H. 


Dover 


Pre-Law 


West Swanzey 


I.E. 


Jamaica Plain, Mass. 


A. G. 


Reed's Ferry 


Pre- Med. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Nashua 


A. G. 


Lebanon 


Agr. 


Lebanon 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Cranston, R. I. 


M.E. 


Plymouth 


Ch.E. 


Enfield 


A.G. 


Hollis 


Bus. Fund. 


Manchester 


A. G. 


Wakefield, Mass. 


I.E. 


Plaistow 


A.G. 


Goffstown 


E.E. 


Lowell, Mass. 


A. G. 


Terryville, Conn. 


H.E. 


Bethlehem 


A.G. 


Manchester 


C.E. 


Reed's Ferry 


E.E. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Lincoln 


M.E. 


Rockland, Mass. 


A.G. 


Manchester 


D.H. 


Contoocook 


A.G. 


Concord 


Bus. Fund. 


Somersworth 


Bus. Fund. 


Northwood Narrows 


Bus. Fund. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Marlboro 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Pre- Med. 


Keene 


D.H. 


Claremont 


Pre-Law 


Colebrook 


271 





UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Langlois, Fred Clayton 
Lavallee, Hubert Arsene 
Lazure, Albert Clarence 
Leach, Chester 
Learned, Robert Craig 
Leavitt, Dorothy Maude 
Leggett, Norman Kentley 
Lehtinen, Holger Gustav 
Leitch, Donald Robert 
Lemay, Louis Bertrand 
Lester, Bernice Howard 
Lewis, Allen Ingalls 
Littlefield, Nance Winslow 
Lloyd, Ronald Joseph 
Lockett, Marjory Davis 
Lorden, Leonard Sloan 
Lovell, Mary Virginia 
Low, Waldron Garfield 
Lucy, Robert Anthony 
Lynch, Edward Kenneth 
Lynch, Robert Emmett 
McLaren, Harry Spurr 
MacNaught, Elizabeth 
Mack, Donald William 
Mailman, Eugene Whitman 
Mann, Philander Leon 
Martin, Frank Sawyer 
Marvin, Edward 
Matoian, Christopher George 
Melendy, Elizabeth Nella 
Menard, Yvette 
Miller, Ralph M. 
Monahan, William Davis 
Moore, Leonard Eugene 
Moore, Leroy Elbert 
Moorehouse, Clifton Davis 
Morse, Victor Louis 
Mozes, Edward 
Mullane, James 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


A.G. 


Lebanon 


I.E. 


Berlin 


Pre-Law 


Berlin 


C.E. 


Moultonhoro 


E.E. 


Woodsville 


A. G. 


Tilton 


Arch. 


Manchester 


Bus. Fund. 


West Concord 


Pre- Med. 


Manchester 


Bus. Fund. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Ipswich, Mass. 


C.E. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Hampstead 


Ch.E. 


Bellows Falls, Vt. 


H.E. 


Exeter 


A.G. 


Milford 


A.G. 


Goffstown 


A.G. 


Derry 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


Bus. Fund. 


Hanover 


A. G. 


Manchester 


Arch. 


Manchester 


H.E. 


Rocliester 


E.E. 


Claremont 


A. G. 


Keene 


Educ. 


East Concord 


Bus. Fund. 


Newport 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


E.E. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Bus. Fund. 


Townsend, Mass, 


Pre-Med. 


Lancaster 


E.E. 


Durham 


I.E. 


Manchester, Mass. 


A.G. 


Tilton 


Ch.E. 


Brattleboro, Vt, 


Pre-Med. 


Manchester 


A. G. 


Portsmouth 


272 





JUNIORS 



Name 
Murdoch, Robert Norman 
Nerbonne, Pauline Mary 
Niebels, Alva Carpenter 
Nightingale, Elsie Thayer 
Nims, Harold Barrett 
Ojanen, Richard Jakko Hendrick 
Osgood, Raymond Hanson 
Otis, Evelyn Natalie 
Papp, Alpha James 
Parkinson, John Anthony 
Perkins, Donald Merrill 
Phelps, Henry Maynard 
Phelps, Marion Avis 
Philbrook, Viola Beatrice 
Phipps, Robert Howard Kingsbury For. 
Pillsbury, Louise Mabel 
Pinkham, Arthur George 
Piper, Donald Joseph 
Pitz, Donald R. 
Potts, Leslie Trueman 
Presby, Harold Freeman 
Pridham, George Sherman 
Prisk, Charles William 
Qualey, Philip Paul 
Rand, Elizabeth 
Raymond, Agnes Thurston 
Redden, Agnes Marie 
Redden, Daniel Joseph 
Reed, Paul Joseph 
Reed, Percy Floyd 
Remick, Philbert Ernest 
Richardson, Stuart Ashley 
Richer, Annette Georgette 
Riley, Matthew Howard 
Roberts, Wade Hayson 
Robinson, Forrest Joy 
Robinson, Francis Edwin 
Ross, Karl Grier 
Rouillier, Napoleon Ernest 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


A. G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Manchester 


For. 


Providence, R. I. 


A.G. 


Charlton, Mass. 


Bus. Fund. 


Keene 


Ch.E. 


Claremont 


E.E. 


Laconia 


A.G. 


Farmingion 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Bus. Fund. 


Penacook 


A.G. 


Smiapee 


Bus. Fund. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Durham 


A.G. 


Meredith 


y For. 


Gorham 


H.E. 


Derry 


E.E. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Franklin 


Ch.E. 


Durham 


E.E. 


Durham 


P.H. 


Henniker 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


C.E. 


Yalesville, Conn. 


A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Epping 


A.G. 


Errol 


A.G. 


Dover 


Bus. Fund. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A. G. 


Durham 


A.G. 


Riverton 


Bus. Fund. 


Lowell, Mass. 


A.G. ^ 


Manchester 


E.E. 


Somersworth 


A.G. 


Dover 


E.E. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Durham 


P.H. 


Gorham 


For. 


Goff's Falls 


273 


• 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Rowden, William Grant 
Riuld, Carol Corlies 
R niter, Cordon Cetlric 
Runiney, joanctte Marion 
Ryiler, Arthur Chaiullor 
Salt marsh, William Rollins 
Siinders, Crace Koniarek 
Sanel, Rose 

Sargent, Clayton David 
Savage, Kenneth Sinclair 
Sawyer, John Raymond 
Sawyer, Lloyd X'incent 
Sawyer, Richard Merrill 
Schiirman, Joseph Leonard 
Scruggs, Paul \\'a>land 
Seften, ICugene Henry 
Serafini, l^orenzo D. 
Shapiro, Mollie Mary 
Shattuck, C^.ranville 
Shea, John Joseph 
Sinclair, Dorothea Winkler 
Skoog, Allan Peter 
Slack, Stanton McCue 
Slavin, Robert Moran 
Smith, George Wendell 
Smith, Jean Esther 
Smith, \'era Maria 
Smith, X'incent Frazier 
Solomon, Samuel Frank 
Spcnce, Dorothy Adelaide 
Spillane, Anna 
Stankiewicz, Mitchell John 
Steere, Edith Ruth 
Steeves, Ethel Elizabeth 
Sterling, William Clinton 
Stetson, Robert Shaw 
Stevens, Edith ^Largaret 
Sturgis, John Edgar 
Sucke, Edmond Adolph 



Course 

A.G. 

A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 

A.G. 

A. G. 

Bus. Fund. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

A. G. 

E.E. 

A.G. 

Ilort. 

E.E. 

A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 

Agr. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 

A. G. 

Ch. E. 

A. G. 

A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

A. G. 

For. 

H.E. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

I.E. 

A.G. 

Arch. 

A.G. 

274 



P. O. Address 

Grovcton 

Durham 

Concord 

Berlin 

Wollaston, Mass. 

Concord 

Durham 

Concord 

GoffstOU'71 

River ton 

Plymouth 

Woodstock 

Exeter 

Portsmouth 

Woodsville 

Bedford, Mass. 

Hanover 

Portsmouth 

Granhy, Conn. 

Manchester 

Exeter 

Hampton 

Franklin 

Nashua 

Goffstown 

Lancaster 

Meriden 

Peterborough 

Franklin 

Berwick, Maine 

Newmarket 

Newport 

A mesbury, Mass. 

Dover 

Melrose, Mass. 

Plaistow 

Haverhill 

Durham 

Hyde Park, Mass. 



Name 
Sullivan, Genevieve Deasy 
Swain, Vernon Trickey 
Szalajeski, Eugienia 
Tallman, Earl Armstrong 
Tasker, George Waldermere 
Taylor, George 
Theodos, Mathew Ralph 
Thurston, Elsie Estella 
Tibbetts, Marion Ellen 
Tiffany, Henry Dyer 
Tilton, Richard Gould 
Tobey, Ardra 
Tonkin, John Fremont 
Toothaker, Curtis Cady 
Trent, George James 
Trombly, Lillian Oberlin 
Tufts, Betty Raymond 
Tuttle, George Edward 
Uicker, John Joseph 
Vanni, Jocondo Dominick 
VanStelten, Anna 
Varney, Marjory Eleanor 
Vasiliou, Vasilios Antoniou 
Vaughan, Oscar Lockwood 
Vintinner, Frederick James 
Vivian, Doris Haskell 
Walker, Agnew Geno 
Walker, Charles Monroe 
Walker, Edith Catharine 
Wallace, Ruth Evelyth 
Webster, John Randolph 
Weeks, Dorothy Eleanor 
Went worth, Cecil Agnew 
Wheeler, Elmer Moore 
Whipple, Verna Alliene 
Whitcher, Frank Earl 
Whitcomb, Arthur Knowlton 
Whiteley, William Milner 
Whittemore, Pauline Elizabeth 



JUNIORS 




Course 


P. 0. Address 


A.G. 


Manchester 


E.E. 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


A.G. 


Laconia 


C.E. 


Manchester 


Agr. Tr, 


New London 


Pre-Med. 


Hudson 


Bus. Fund. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Wolfeboro 


A.G. 


Groveton 


A.G. 


North Weare 


A.G. 


Laconia 


A.G. 


Wolfeboro 


Pre-Law 


Durham 


I.E. 


Rockland, Mass. 


Pre-Med. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Concord 


Educ. 


Lancaster 


Hort. 


Dover 


I.E. 


Derry 


Bus. Fund. 


Peterborough 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Alton Bay 


Bus. Fund. 


Manchester 


Arch. 


Portsmouth 


Pre-Med. 


Lisbon 


A.G. 


Gloucester, Mass. 


Bus. Fund. 


Lebanon 


A.G. 


Chelmsford, Mass. 


A.G. 


Contoocook 


A.G. 


Dover 


E.E. 


Hartland, Vt. 


Phys. Ed. 


Pittsfield 


Pre-Law 


Dover 


Arch. 


Milford 


H.E. 


Lebanon 


E.E. 


Bartlett 


E.E. 


Bellows Falls, Vt. 


Bus. Fund. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Lyme 


275 





UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Whittemore, Ruth 
Whynott, Wallace Everett 
Wiggin, Lena Blanche 
Wiggins, Clifford Roy 
Willand, Allen Benjamin 
Willey, Floyd Lester 
Wilson, James Lawrence 
Wilson, Rhoda Mae 
Winer, Pauline 
Wood, Marjorie \^irginia 
Wooldridge, William Wallace 
WooUey, Austin Gilbert 
Worthen, Eugene Porter 
Wright, Marion 
Young, Edna Susan 
Young, Irene Harriett 
Young, William Carleton 



Name 
Abbiati, Ennio 
Abramson, Benjamin 
Ahlgren, Adler Robert 
Akeson, Elmer Gunnar 
Allen, Fred Ernest 
Alley, Elizabeth Stetson 
Alpers, Bernard Jacob 
Ames, Mary Natalie 
Atwood, Charlotte Ann 
Augustinus, Robert Herman 
Avery, Margaret Elizabeth 
Ayer, Gordon Roundy 
Ayers, John Robert 
Baker, Florence Mildred 
Baker, Robert Gordon 
Bakus, Samuel Themistoklis 
Ball, Charlotte Mabel 
Barker, Laurence Alvin 
Barnaby, Barbara Copeland 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


A.G. 


Lyme 


Pre- Med. 


Antrim 


A.G. 


Stratham 


Ch.E. 


Montpelier, Vt. 


Bus. Fund. 


Manchester 


Pre-Law 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Haverhill 


A.G. 


Derry Village 


H.E. 


Epping 


A.G. 


Hampton 


M.E. 


Laconia 


C.E. 


Andover, Mass. 


M.E. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Alton 


A.G. 


Ossipee 


H.E. 


Newmarket 


Pre-Law 


Dover 


[ORES (346: 


) 


Course 


P. 0. Address 


For. 


Barre, Vt. 


A.G. 


Berlin 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Concord 


D.H. 


North Hampton 


A.G. 


Union 


A.G. 


Salem, Mass. 


H.E. 


Somersworth 


A.G. 


Lisbon 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Wolfeboro 


C.E. 


Keene 


A. G. 


Everett, Mass. 


A.G. 


Concord 


E.E. 


Derry 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Colebrook 


E.E. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 



Name 
Bartlett, Waldrof Ray, Jr. 
Bean, Nan Gordu 
Bemis, Millard Stanton 
Berry, Mary Marjorie 
Billman, Edward S. 
Black, Rose 
Blais, Maurice Adelard 
Blaisdell, Daniel Crysler 
Blake, Leon Hurd 
Blanchard, George Walton 
Boothby, Bradford Saunders 
Bowen, Fay Sanford 
Bowman, Audrey Elizabeth 
Brannen, Malcolm Dodge 
Bresnahan, Clare Alberta 
Bretschneider, Estelle Mary 
Brisson, Emma Diana 
Bronstein, Joseph Edward 
Brooks, Earl 

Brown, Charles Knowlton 
Brown, Edna Frances 
Brown, Joseph True 
Burbank, Robert William 
Burns, Arthur Royal 
Burrill, Guy Francis 
Burton, Charles William 
Bussell, Arthur Lalor 
Butson, Helen Sarah 
Buttrick, Carlton Elwin 
Caldwell, Stacy Wadaz 
Callahan, Robert Henry 
Campbell, John Bernard 
Carpenter, Harriet Leah 
Carpenter, Helen Genevieve 
Carrigan, John Edward 
Cataldi, Angelo 
Caverly, Ruth Elizabeth 
Chaloner, Raymond Pierce 
Chandler, Warren David 



SOPHOMORES 




Course 


P. 0. Address 


Hort. 


Newport 


A.G. 


Concord 


Pre- Med. 


Dublin 


Pre-Law 


Rochester 


Bus. Fund. 


Wollaston, Mass 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Dover 


E.E. 


Plymouth 


Bus. Fund. 


Manchester 


Bus. Fund. 


Portland, Maine 


s Bus. Fund. 


Wakefield, Mass. 


A.G. 


Meredith 


H.E. 


Salmon Falls 


A.G. 


Durham 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A. G. 


Exeter 


A.G. 


Newmarket 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Manchester 


M.E. 


South Danhury 


H.E. 


Keene 


Agr. 


Deerfield 


A.G. 


Derry 


Bus. Fund. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Claremont 


Agr. 


Chichester 


A.G. 


Dumont, N. J. 


Bus. Fund. 


Woodsville 


A.G. 


East Hampstead 


Bus. Fund. 


Portsmouth 


Bus. Fund. 


Gloucester, Mass. 


A. G. 


Manchester 


A. Ch.^ 


Newmarket 


A.G. 


Somersworth 


Pre- Med 


Somersworth 


A.G. 


Wolfeboro 


A.G. 


Strafford 


Bus. Fund. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Dover 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Chase, Louise Lowell 
Chase, Malcolm Jerome 
Clapp, Richard Caswell 
Clark, Clifford Rowe 
Coburn, Paul Wayne 
Colburn, Francis Leslie 
Coleman, Clark Moody 
Conroy, John Joseph 
Croke, Harry William 
Crowell, Oilman Kimball 
Crowley, Bernard Francis 
Currie, Wilsie Austin 
Curtis, Horace Leslie 
Cushman, Otis French 
Dallinger, William Stearns 
Dane, John Alexander 
Davie, Elsie Enid 
Dearborn, Paul Edward 
Dickerman, Edmond Howard 
Dodge, Ralph Lendell 
Dodge, Richard Morgan 
Dodge, Ruth Ellen 
Dolloff, Charles Clarence 
Donovan, Francis Rule 
Dorfman, Edmund 
Dorsey, Regal Harry 
Dosenberg, Fred August 
Downing, Cecelia Eleanor 
Duffy, Ethel Maria 
Dunford, Ernest Frank 
Dunford, Ralph Chester 
Dustin, Edward Eugene 
Eadie, William Robert 
Egbert, Margaret Baker 
Elkavich, Frank Daniel 
Ellsworth, Russell Jenkins 
Eustis, Richard James 
Fecteau, Ivanetta Mae 
Fernald, Mary Louise 



Course 
A. G. 
C.E. 

Bus. Fund. 
Arch. 
Arch. 

Bus. Fund. 
Agr. 

Bus. Fund. 
For. 
Ch.E. 
Bus. Fund. 
A.G. 
M.E. 
E.E. 
A.G. 
A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 
Bus. Fund. 
I.E. 
D.H. 
A.G. 
A.G. 
M.E. 
Bus. Fund. 
Pre-Law 
A.G. 
Educ. 
A.G. 
Phys. Ed. 
M.E. 
E.E. 
C.E. 
For. 
A. G. 
Pre- Med. 
Arch. 
Educ. 
A. G. 
A. G. 
278 



P. O. Address 

Manchester 

Seabrook 

Concord 

Portsmouth 

Londonderry 

Co7itoocook 

Portsmouth 

Newport, R. I. 

Claremont 

Concord 

Concord 

Providence, R. I. 

Lakeport 

Stratham 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Concord 

Concord 

Tilton 

Brookline 

Bradford 

Manchester 

New Boston 

Maiden, Mass. 

Keene 

Berlin 

Wallingford, Conn. 

Alexandria 

Nashua 

Dover 

Keene 

Keene 

Penacook 

Manchester 

Wolfeboro 

Nashua 

Penacook 

Marblehead, Mass. 

Exeter 

Nottingham 



Name 
Ferryall, Thelma Pearl 
Fessenden, David William 
Fields, Marion Lena 
Finley, Holman Haines 
Fisher, Joseph Raymond 
Flanders, Yora Virginia 
Fleischman, Nathan 
Flint, Elizabeth Josephine 
Folsom, Edward Simeon 
Ford, Vera Mae 
Foster, Walter John 
Freeman, Charles Faulkner 
Freese, George Lamb 
Frost, Leonard Rudolph 
Fuller, Frederic Dresser 
Gadd, Eileen Ross 
Gates, Frederick Arthur 
Geoffrion, Raymond Adrien 
Gibbons, William Edward 
Gleason, John Ripley 
Goodrich, Ralph Winthrop 
Gordon, Elliott Bishop 
Gordon, Herbert 
Grady, John Francis 
Graham, Arthur Samuel 
Greene, Robert Gushing 
Grossman, Bernard 
Hackler, Ivah Augustus 
Hagerty, Norman Albert 
Halstead, Ruth 
Handschu maker, Edward 
Hanley, Howard Eugene 
Harriman, Alfred Munroe 
Harriman, Elmer Lane 
Harris, James Campbell 
Hartigan, John Louis 
Hawkes, Harold Melvin 
Hayes, Charles Gilman 
Hayes, James Henry 



SOPHOMORES 




Course 


P. 0. Address 


A. Ch. 


Nashua 


Pre-Law 


Brookline 


A. G. 


Reed's Ferry 


Bus. Fund 


'. Colehrook 


Bus. Fund 


. Rochester 


A.G. 


Ansonia, Conn. 


Bus. Fund 


. Manchester 


A.G. 


Plymouth 


Bus. Fund 


. Dover 


H.E. 


Plymouth 


A.G. 


Suncook 


Bus. Fund 


. Concord 


E.E. 


Bristol 


C.E. 


Concord 


Ch.E. 


North Stratford 


A.G. 


Plymouth 


Bus. Fund. 


. Waltham, Mass. 


M.E. 


Newmarket 


M.E. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Dublin 


A.G. 


Rochester 


I.E. 


Wonalancet 


Bus. Fund. 


Concord 


C.E. 


Chichester 


A. Ch. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Keene 


Pre- Med. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Marlboro 


Bus. Fund. 


. Nashua 


A.G. 


Hampstead 


Ch.E. 


Manchester 


Bus. Fund. Providence, R. I. 


C.E.- 


Warner 


I.E. 


Bartlett 


A.G. 


Queen's Village, N. Y. 


Pre- Med. 


Rochester 


Educ. 


Portland, Maine 


A. Ch. 


Exeter 


A.G. 


Wollaston, Mass. 


279 





UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Hayward, Kenneth William 
Hazen, Hollis Milan 
Hazzard, Norman Earl 
Head, Francis Allison 
Healy, Arthur Joseph 
Heath, Wesley Knowlton 
Henderson, Lawrence William 
Hikel, Nolan George 
Hinckley, Owen 
Holmberg, Gerald William 
Hooper, Helen Arlyne 
Hooper, Robert Wilkins 
Hoyt, Frank Edward 
Hubbard, Harriet Stone 
Jackson, Norton 
Jaques, Leigh Francis 
Jenkins, Dorothy Alfreda 
Jenney, Doris Arvella 
Jennison, David Blanchard 
Johnson, Elmer Noyes 
Joyal, Jean McAllister 
Keller, Otto Pitman 
Kelso, Velna Marriett 
Kerr, Benedict Alexander 
Kibbey, Francis Bernard 
Kirsch, Dorothy Ellen 
Knabenshue, Karl Emmons Hill 
Korol, Myroslaw 
Lampron, Herman George 
Lampson, Seth Albert 
Lane, Frances Elohe 
Lang, Everett Hilton 
Lang, Francis Edward 
Lanzilli, Carlo Edmund 
Leavitt, Morrill William 
Lehman, Jane Clifton 
Levine, Sayra 
Levingston, Ida Bertha 
Little, Robert George 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


M.E. 


Hancock 


A.H. 


Concord 


Agr. Tr. 


Berlin 


A.G. 


Farmington 


Pre-Law 


Manchester 


M.E. 


Franklin 


A.G. 


Merrimack 


A.G. 


Plymouth 


A.G. 


Mamaroneck, N. Y. 


I.E. 


Bedford 


Phys. Ed. 


Greenland 


E.E. 


Sanbornville 


A.G. 


Gorham, Maine 


A.G. 


Peterborough 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Worcester, Mass. 


Educ. 


New Durham 


A.G. 


South Portland, Maine 


A.G. 


Milford 


A.G. 


Newburyport, Mass. 


H.E. 


Tilton 


M.E. 


Laconia 


A.G. 


Hillsboro 


A.G. 


Gloucester, Mass. 


A.G. 


Cornish Flat 


A.G. 


New Boston 


Pre-Law 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Pre-Med. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


New London 


A.G. 


Errol 


Ch.E. 


Durham 


A.G. 


Somersworth 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


Arch. 


Tilton 


A.G. 


New York City 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Concord 


Bus. Fund 


I. Concord 


280 





SOPHOMORES 



Name 
Lord, Almon Mudgett 
Lord, Fred Adalbert 
Lord, Harry Donald 
Luce, Beatrice Mabelle 
McCammon, Mildred Mannette 
McDonald, Donald Franklin 
MacDonald, Jean 
McFadden, Albert Edmund 
McGinley, Harold Everett 
McGlynn, Kathryn Lucille 
Mclnnis, Katherine 
Mclntyre, Alice Ruth 
McKoan, Thomas Paul 
McLellan, John Bailey 
McNutt, Mary Elizabeth 
Magnuson, George Adolf 
Mailman, Harry LeRoy 
Mann, Guy Webster 
Markowitz, Harry 
Marshall, Richard Barton 
Martin, Henry George 
Mather, Carol Samble 
Mauricette, Robert Edgerly 
Maynard, Alexander Emile 
Meader, Annie Mckery 
Mecheski, Edward Michael 
Meehan, Nancy West 
Meloon, Harriett Apphia 
Merrill, Edith Myra 
Merrill, John Arthur 
Metcalf, Clarence Walter 
Meunier, Lionel Lucien 
Mitchell, Walter Russell 
Molloy, Agnes Margaret 
Moore, Gordon Lorenzo 
Moore, Mark Mason 
Moreau, Jean Wilfred 
Morin, Gerard Ludger 
Morrill, Alberta Ross 



Course 
Agr. Ch. 
D.H. 
For. 
A. G. 
A.G. 
C.E. 
Phys. Ed. 
Pre- Med. 
E.E. 
A.G. 
A. G. 

Bus. Fund. 
A. G. 
Arch. 
A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 
A. G. 
Agr. 

Bus. Fund. 
Bus. Fund. 
D.H. 
A. G. 
I.E. 
C.E. 
A.G. 
Agr. Ch. 
A.G. 
Phys. Ed. 
A.G. 
C.E. 

Bus. Fund. 
Pre-Law 
A. G. 
A. G. 
E.E. 
M.E. 
A.G. 
Pre-Law 
A. G. 
281 



P. O. Address 

Dover 

Salem Depot 

South Portland, Maine 

Exeter 

Portsmouth 

Manchester 

Brookfield, Mass. 

Dover 

Tilton 

Nashua 

Concord 

Whitefield 

Westville 

Woodsville 

Durham 

Concord 

Keene 

East Concord 

Wallingford, Conn. 

Milford 

West Hopkinton 

Manchester 

Dover 

Nashua 

Dover 

Northfield, Mass. 

Dover 

Ossipee 

Groveton 

Storrs, Conn. 

Alstead 

Nashua 

Plymouth 

Nashua 

Portsmouth 

Milford 

Manchester 

Berlin 

East Kingston 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Morrison, Robert Herman 
Morse, Arthur Congdon 
Morton, Sarah Elizabeth 
Mott, Guibert Allen 
Mowatt, Doris Elizabeth 
Mowatt, Dorothea Claire 
Mulford, John Allen 
Nardelli, Angelo 
Nevin, Jean Shivervick 
Noyes, Carlton Fletcher 
Nute, Velma Eliza 
O'Hare, James Francis 
O'Neil, Roger William 
Osgood, Jonathan Abram 
Palmer, Walter Herman 
Parkhurst, Donald Spofford 
Parnell, Priscilla 
Patenaude, Duainne Tyler 
Paul, Edith Rosetta 
Paul, Ruth Angell 
Penley, Howard Donald 
Perkins, Emily Weld 
Perkins, Frederic Blood 
Perkins, Thomas Alexander 
Perley, James Dwight 
Peterson, Bernard Oliver 
Peterson, Conrad Francis 
Peterson, Stanley Samuel 
Philbrick, Alfred Parson 
Pike, Charles Willard 
Plourde, Edward Francis 
Polisson, Paul Angel 
Powers, Virginia 
Prentice, Lawrence Ancel 
Prescott, Philip Thompson 
Quint, Levi Wilder 
Ramsay, Harold Spencer 
Randell, Norman James 
Redden, Anna Josephine 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


Bus. Fund. 


Laconia 


Agr. 


Newhuryport, Mass. 


A.G. 


Concord 


C.E. 


Brandon, Vt. 


A.G. 


Exeter 


A.G. 


Exeter 


Arch. 


Westmoreland 


A.G. 


Providence, R. I. 


H.E. 


Edgartown, Mass. 


A.G. 


Sunapee 


Bus. Fund. 


Rochester 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Pre- Med. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Pittsfield 


Bus. Fund. 


Salem 


A.G. 


Peterborough 


A.G. 


Manchester 


M.E. 


Henniker 


A.G. 


Sunapee 


Phys. Ed. 


Sunapee 


A.G. 


Portland, Maine 


H.E. 


Meredith 


E.E. 


Bartlett 


A.G. 


Gorham 


M.E. 


Durham 


I.E. 


Rochester 


Bus. Fund. 


Amesbury, Mass. 


Bus. Fund. 


Manchester 


E.E. 


Portsmouth 


Ch.E. 


Colebrook 


A.G. 


Manchester 


C.E. 


Gloucester, Mass. 


A.G. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Winchester 


A.G. 


Stratham 


A.G. 


Conway 


A. G. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Amesbury, Mass. 


A.G. 


Dover 


282 





SOPHOMORES 




Name 


Course 


P. 0. Address 


Reid, Orrien Kenneth 


E.E. 


Gorham 


Remington, Louise Elizabeth 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Richards, Robert Ladd 


Pre- Med. 


Durham 


Richardson, Madeline Smith 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Ricker, Wayne Sherwood 


A.G. 


Rochester 


Riley, Elwyn Arthur 


E.E. 


Concord 


Robbins, Paul James 


Ch.E. 


Berlin 


Roche, John Francis 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Rogers, Barron Terry 


Agr. 


Franklin 


Rolfe, Preston Elwell 


E.E. 


Portsmouth 


Ross, Lawrence Waldo 


M.E. 


Gorham 


Rowell, Leonard Dexter 


A. Ch. 


Manchester 


St. Clair, John Edward, Jr. 


I.E. 


Laconia 


St. Francois, Robert Gerald 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Saltmarsh, Gertrude Elizabeth 


A. G. 


Concord 


Sampson, Myrtle Louise 


A.G. 


Hampton Beach 


Sands, Virginia 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


Santy, Clifford George 


Pre- Med. 


Lisbon 


Sargent, Murray Hiram 


E.E. 


New London 


Sayward, Mary Ella 


A.G. 


Lancaster 


Schurman, Wilbur Morrison 


Educ. 


Lancaster 


Schwartz, Joseph 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


Scott, George Washington 


Arch. 


Rochester 


Scott, Richard Ring 


C.E. 


Raymond 


Shannon, Gertrude 


A.G. 


Concord 


Sheehan, Thomas Paul 


For. 


Portsmouth 


Sherwood, Henry 


Pre- Med. 


Dover 


Silverman, William Royal 


Pre- Med. 


Manchester 


Slack, James Edward 


A.G. 


Cornish 


Slack, Raymond Sutton 


A.G. 


Meriden 


Smart, Kenneth Rutledge 


For. 


Portsmouth 


Smith, Dorothy Eleanor 


A.G. 


Londonderry 


Smith, Elizabeth Wingate 


A.G.-. 


Dover 


Smith, Ernest Wilbur 


C.E. 


Manchester 


Smith, Eugene 


M.E. 


New Hampton 


Smith, Karl Leavitt 


Educ. 


Laconia 


Smith, Malcolm Walker 


Educ. 


Mechanic Falls, Maine 


Smith, Marjorie Helen 


Phys. Ed. 


Newfields 


Snell, Fred William 


Ch.E. 
283 


Lisbon 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Spinney, Roger Hammond 
Spires, George Vincent 
Stafford, David Dexter 
Steele, Owen Eldred 
Stenberg, Henry George 
Stevens, Frances Evelyn 
Stokes, Stewart Lincoln 
Stone, John Eaton 
Strom, Carl Rodney 
Sullivan, James Arnold 
Sullivan, Ruth Frances 
Swallow, Donald Walcott 
Sweet, Percy Harold 
Teague, Julian Hall 
Tenney, Forrest Franklin 
Thayer, Gordon Oliver 
Thompson, Charlotte 
Thompson, Ernest Edward 
Thompson, Robert Martin 
Thorin, Ernest Gerald 
Tolman, Gordon Francis 
True, Eunice Gertrude 
Vallancourt, William Richard 
Varney, Doris Grace 
Viano, Lawrence Francis 
Volkman, William John 
Wageman, Theofiel Morie 
Waite, Harold Gardner 
W^alden, George Richard 
Wales, Maurice Arthur 
Walker, Frederick Nason, Jr. 
W^alstrom, John Erwin 
Wark, David Leslie 
Wettergreen, Charles Oscar 
Wheelock, Howard Ellis 
Whitcomb, Frank William 
White, Emily Thornedyke 
White, Waldron Carter 
Whitehouse, Watson Raymond 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


E.E. 


Salem, Mass. 


E.E. 


Berlin 


A.G. 


Gloucester, Mass. 


A. Ch. 


Union 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Bus. Fund. 


Melrose, Mass. 


Ch.E. 


Northwood Center 


A.G. 


Concord 


E.E. 


Boston, Mass. 


H.E. 


Somersworth 


Pre- Med. 


Manchester 


Bus. Fund. 


Lisbon 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


A.H. 


Antrim 


A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Manchester 


For. 


Manchester 


C.E. 


Hudson 


I.E. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Chesham 


H.E. 


West Hampstead 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Center Strafford 


Bus. Fund. 


North Hampton 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Educ. 


Manchester 


Bus. Fund. 


Manchester 


E.E. 


Portsmouth 


Ch.E. 


Penacook 


E.E. 


Manchester 


E.E. 


Keene 


Bus. Fund. 


Winchester 


A. G. 


Maiden, Mass. 


A.G. 


Keene 


E.E. 


Bellows Falls, Vt. 


A.G. 


Rye Beach 


Pre-Law 


Peterborough 


Bus. Fund. 


Holyoke, Mass. 



FRESHMEN 




Name 


Course 


P. 0. Address 


Whyte, Joseph James 


For. 


Lancaster 


Williams, Ralph Harry 


M.E. 


Lebanon 


Williamson, Dean Plummer 


Bus. Fund. 


Concord 


W^ilson, Charles Henry 


A.G. 


Portland, Maine 


Winslow, Rachel Elizabeth 


H.E. 


Somersworth 


Witham, Cedric Ned 


M.E. 


Grantham 


Witkus, Arthur Henry 


M.E. 


Newport 


Wittenberg, Hyman Herbert . 


M.E. 


Concord 


Wood, Edward George 


C.E. 


Rochester 


Wood, Harry Laurence 


E.E. 


Providence, R. I. 


Woodbury, Stanley Nathaniel 


Educ. 


Contoocook 


Wooldridge, Sydney Milton 


A. G. 


Laconia 


Worcester, Franklin Augustus 


A.G. 


Mollis 


Wright, Norman Arthur 


A.G. 


Keene 


Young, Margaret Elizabeth 


A.G. 


Keene 


FRESHMEN (458) 




Abbe, George Bancroft 


A.G. 


Dublin 


Abrams, Carl Ogdon 


Pre-Law 


Portsmouth 


Adam, Laurent Albert 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Adams, Frederick Lewis 


A. G. 


Salisbury 


Adams, Raymond Houghton 


Bus. Fund. 


Concord 


Ahlgren, Clarence Livingston 


M.E. 


Manchester 


Allen, Russell Lynn 


Ch.E. 


North Newport 


Amazeen, Walter Melvin 


E.E. 


Farmington 


Andberg, William Gust 


For. 


West Concord 


Anderson, Wendell Everett 


C.E. 


Milan 


Andrews, Robert Orin 


E.E. 


Medford, Mass. 


Andrews, Virginia Natalie 


A.G. 


Rochester 


Applin, Frank Boutilier 


M.E. 


Providence, R. I. 


Atkins, Arden Gerald 


A.G. 


Haverhill 


Atwood, Robert Earle 


Bus. Fund. 


Concord 


Auerbach, Richard Dexter 


A.G. . 


Durham 


Babcock, Janet Marion 


A.G. 


Bristol, Conn. 


Bacon, Everett Holton 


Bus. Fund. 


West Lebanon 


Baker, Robert Fletcher 


For. 


Manchester 


Baldacci, Elda Angela 


Phys. Ed. 


Claremont 


Baldwin, Willard Justus 


C.E. 


Colebrook 


Ballou, James Monroe 


Pre-Med. 


Keene 



285 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 


Course 


P. 0. Address 


Barney, Richard John 


Bus. Fund. 


, Whitefield 


Barry, Robert Elmer 


A.G. 


Dorchester, Mass. 


Bartlett, Florence Anna 


A.G. 


Claremont 


Basim, Mary Mercedes 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


Bateman, John Robinson 


M.E. 


Claremont 


Bateman, Robert Taylor 


Pre- Med. 


Concord 


Battles, Chester Warren 


Pre-Law 


Manchester 


Beecher, Clarence Leland 


Pre-Law 


Errol 


Beede, Arnold Henry 


M.E. 


Hampstead 


Behan, Harry Chester 


Bus. Fund 


. Dover 


Berry, Ada Gertrude 


A. G. 


Dover 


Beverstock, Malcolm Green 


Bus. Fund 


. Keene 


Bieling, Howard John 


A.G. 


Harrington Park, N. J. 


Biro, Helen Blanche 


A.G. 


Newmarket 


Black, Rochelle Isabella 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Blaine, Kenneth Arthur 


Ch.E. 


Manchester 


Blaisdell, Charles Albert 


Ch.E. 


Somersworth 


Blaisdell, Fred William 


M.E. 


Goffstown 


Blaisdell, Leslie Newton 


Hort. 


Goffstown 


Boardway, Barbara 


A.G. 


Claremont 


Booth, Bradley Hyatt 


E.E. 


Laconia 


Boston, Elwyn Richard 


M.E. 


Dover 


Bournival, Gertrude Elizabeth 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Boyajian, Aramis Arthur 


A. Ch. 


Nashua 


Bremner, Robert Marshal 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Brewster, Donald Leslie 


C.E. 


West Lebanon 


Brianos, Christos D. 


Ch.E. 


Manchester 


Brown, Charles Stanley 


Agr. 


Wentworth 


Bruce, Gordon G. 


A.G. 


Claremont 


Bujnievicz, Jennie 


A.G. 


Laconia 


Bullard, Lester 


A.G. 


Concord 


Burlingame, Roland Smith 


E.E. 


Lebanon 


Burns, Kate Angelia 


H.E. 


Milford 


Burns, Warren Whitcomb 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Buttrick, Lloyd 


A.G. 


Hillsboro 


Buxton, Agnes Lucille 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Bryan, James Joseph 


For. 


Bristol 


Cantlin, Clark Alson 


A.G. 


Lebanon 


Carlton, Alden Lee 


Bus. Fund 
286 


. Goffstown 



FRESHMEN 



Name 
Carswell, Philip John 
Carter, Theodore Batchelder 
Casey, Mary Catherine 
Chaloner, Stewart Livingstone 
Chamberlin, Gertrude Alice 
Chapman, Carleton Abramson 
Chase, Dorothy Louise 
Chestnolvich, Walter Peter 
Clark, Burton Chase 
Clark, Elroy Graham 
Clark, Fred Towle 
Clark, Grace Deborah 
Clark, Harvey Ambrose 
Clark, Maurice Varney 
Clark, Roy William 
Clarkson, Richard Blodgett 
Clifford, Thomas Henry 
Clogston, Charlotte Montague 
Collins, Muriel Elizabeth 
Congdon, Lin wood Harvey 
Cook, Leslie Eugene 
Cooper, Paul Herman 
Copadis, James Thomas 
Cormier, Ralph 
Corson, Cynthia Towle 
Corson, Emerson 
Couture, Albert Elzear 
Cram, Joseph Leavitt 
Crawford, Clayton Harold 
Creteau, Wilfrid William 
Cronshaw, Thomas Hanscomb 
Crooks, Helen Frances 
Crosby, George Edward 
Currier, James Luke 
Currul, Beatrice Sherwood 
Cuthbert, Karl Raymond 
Dane, Lucille 

Daroska, Mary Magdelene 
Darrah, Cynthia Florence 



Course 
Ch.E. 
Pre-Law 
H. E. 
Bus. Fund. 
A. G. 
A. G. 
Phys. Ed. 
For. 
A.G. 
Pre-Law 
Educ. 
A.G. 
For. 
A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 
A.G. 
For. 

Phys. Ed. 
H.E. 
M.E. 
M.E. 
C.E. 
A. G. 
C.E. 
A. G. 
Ch. E. 
E.E. 
C.E. 
E.E. 
A. G. 

Bus. Fund. 
A. G. 

Bus. Fund. 
M.E. 
H.E. 
P.H. 
A. G. 
A. G. 
A.G. 
287 



P. O. Address 

Che sham 

Manchester 

Somersworth 

Nashua 

Manchester 

Groveton 

Weare 

Nashua 

Exeter 

Portsmouth 

Portsmouth 

Woodstock 

Hollis Center, Maine 

Manchester 

Manchester 

Newburyport, Mass. 

Franklin 

Ely, Vt. 

South Danville 

Troy 

Portsmouth 

Lincoln 

Manchester 

Manchester 

Dover 

Rochester 

Claremont 

Hampton Falls 

New London 

Rochester 

Newfields 

Malone, N. Y. 

Hanover 

Tilton 

Nashua 

Newport 

Nashua 

Pittsfield 

Mont Vernon 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Davidson, Leon Montique 
Davis, Louise 
Dawson, Charles Reginald 
Decker, William Cunningham 
Demos, Arthur Nicholas 
deMoulpied, David Allen 
Dente, Nelson John 
Derby, Harold Raymond 
Devereaux, Mary Eileen 
Dickey, Edna Frances 
Dickson, Howard Thorn well 
Dinnerman, Maurice 
Doe, Margaret 
Dogan, Adam Edward 
Dow, Eustace Douglas 
Dozois, Louise Irene 
Dufton, Norman Mitchell 
Dumont, Omer Mitchell 
Dunlap, Catherine Alice 
Dunnan, Donald Wood 
Durgin, Margaret Worthen 
Dwyer, James Howard 
Dziura, Francis Richard 
Eastwick, John 
Eaton, Marjorie Louise 
Edgerley, Herman Dore 
Edgerly, John Hilton 
Eldridge, Paul Woodbury 
Elizabeth, Lucien A. 
Elliott, Harold Hutchins 
Fadden, Eugene Elbridge 
Farrington, Helen Barr 
Fearon, John Henry 
Feindel, Howard Walker 
Felch, J. Eugene 
Ferrini, Lincoln Paul 
Ferry, Clarence Everett 
Fields, Margaret Edith 
Files, Carolyn May 



Course 


P. O. Address 


E.E. 


Berlin 


A. G. 


Farmington 


M.E. 


Claremont 


A. G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Concord 


M.E. 


Manchester 


C.E. 


Barre, Vt. 


A.G. 


Woodsville 


H.E. 


Somersworth 


A.G. 


Salem 


E.E. 


Manchester 


Pre- Med. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Dover 


E.E. 


Nashua 


For. 


Hanover 


A. G. 


Manchester 


M.E. 


Exeter 


A.G. 


Marlboro 


A.G. 


Lancaster 


Educ. 


Everett, Mass. 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


Pre- Med. 


Somersworth 


A. G. 


Manchester 


E.E. 


South Tamworth 


A.G. 


Melrose, Mass. 


M. E. 


Chocorua 


M.E. 


Meredith 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Manchester 


I.E. 


Danvers, Mass. 


C.E. 


Meriden 


A. G. 


Claremont 


A.G. 


Saco, Maine 


E.E. 


Berlin 


Pre- Law 


Winchester 


Pre-Law 


Portsmouth 


C.E. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Suffield, Conn. 


Educ. 


Meredith 


288 





FRESHMEN 




Name 


Course 


P. 0. Address 


Finn, Marie Veronica 


A. G. 


Newfields 


Fisher, Albert Charles 


A.G. 


Rochester 


Fitch, Ruth Cleo 


H.E. 


Lancaster 


Fletcher, John Christopher 


Arch. 


Plymouth 


Floyd, Wesley Rufus 


C.E. 


South Hampton 


Fosher, Harold Bert 


M.E. 


Bedford 


Foster, Clayton Reginald 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Foster, Everett Clarke 


M.E. 


Windham 


Foster, Virginia Frances 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Fothergill, William Norris 


Ch.E. 


Pittsfield 


Fox, John Trow 


C.E. 


Mont Vernon 


French, Thomas Penn 


Bus. Fund. 


Durham 


Gaffney, Edward Joseph 


A. Ch. 


Nashua 


Gage, Norman Dwight 


E.E. 


Newport 


Gamache, Le Verne Joseph 


Ch.E. 


Stewartstown 


Garland, Harold Roy 


E.E. 


Portsmouth 


Garland, Thomas Emery 


A.G. 


Gorham 


Garneau, Andrew Joseph 


Bus. Fund. 


Franklin 


George, Margaret Elizabeth 


A. G. 


Newmarket 


Gibbons, Henry Raymond 


Bus. Fund. 


Lowell, Mass. 


Giffin, John Eraser 


E.E. 


Wilton 


Gilman, John Garland 


For. 


Laconia 


Glennon, Francis John 


A. G. 


Manchester 


Goldstein, Rose Barbara 


A. G. 


Portsmouth 


Goodman, Ruth Polimer 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


Goodman, Samuel Benjamin 


A.G. 


Lebanon 


Goodwin, Marian Pauline 


A.G. 


Goffstown 


Gormley, Eugene Gordon 


Pre- Med. 


Lancaster 


Gove, Wendel Alson 


E.E. 


Hinsdale 


Grant, Alanson Ware 


E.E. 


Lyme 


Greenwood, Norman Keniston 


Bus. Fund. 


North Andover, Mass 


Grenier, Gabrielle Marguerite 


A. G. 


Manchester 


Griffin, Rodney Almus 


C.E. 


Franklin 


Griffith, Robert Frederick 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Grinnell, George Herbert 


Pre-Law 


Derry 


Hadley, Robert Peaslee 


Bus. Fund. 


Manchester 


Hanna, Edward James, Jr. 


Pre-Law 


West Swanzey 


Hannigan, Teresa Frances 


A.G. 


Exeter 


Hardy, Clyde Solon 


Ch.E, 
289 


Enfield 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Harrington, Donald Robinson 
Hart, Herman Howard 
Hascall, Olive Frances 
Haskell, Louise Frasier 
Hastings, Vera Thomas 
Hatch, Carolyn Trafton 
Hatton, Joseph Herbert 
Haweeli, Edward Herbert 
Hawkins, Frederick William 
Haynes, Wesley Eaton 
Hazen, Constance Dana 
Heifer, Anna Katherine 
Henault, Leopold 
Henderson, Paul Wesley 
Hennessey, William Edward 
Hibbard, Blanche Louise 
Hibbard, Ruth 
Higgins, Francis Ernest 
Hill, Alice Pearle 
Hill, Wilfred Clayton 
Hills, Helen 

Hills, Jeanne Champlain 
Hobbs, Maurice Earl 
Hogan, Christine Agnes 
Holt, John Dale 
Hough, Marion Anita 
Hounsell, Hazel Towle 
Howard, John Adams 
Howe, Chester William 
Howell, Frederick Fisher Taylor 
Hoyt, Richmond Hammond 
Hunkins, Charlotte Louise 
Hunt, Roger Whitcomb 
Hurley, George Norton 
Hurley, Thomas Dennie 
Huse, Ernest Leslie 
Jackson, Carrol Edward 
Jackson, Luther Myron 
Janetos, George Simos 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


C.E. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Riverside, R. I. 


A.G. 


Dover 


H.E. 


Claremont 


A.G. 


Kittery, Maine 


A. G. 


Manchester 


Pre- Med. 


Berlin 


C.E. 


Troy 


C.E. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Lebanon 


A.G. 


Exeter 


M.E. 


Newport 


A.H. 


Merrimack 


Educ. 


Lakeport 


Phys. Ed. 


Penacook 


A.G. 


Lebanon 


A. G. 


Salem Depot 


H.E. 


Goffstown 


C.E. 


Woodsville 


A. G. 


Milford 


A. G. 


Dover 


E.E. 


Lyme 


A. G. 


Newfields 


A.G. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Riverside, R. I. 


A.G. 


Durham 


A.G. 


Concord 


A. G. 


Franklin 


A. G. 


Portsmouth 


E. E. 


Concord 


A. G. 


Auburn 


E.E. 


Swanzey 


A. G. 


Concord 


Bus. Fund. 


Wilton 


E.E. 


Meriden 


Ch.E. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Bethlehem 


Pre-Law 


Dover 



FRESHMEN 




Name 


Course 


P. 0. Address 


Jeffery, Robert Hamilton 


M.E. 


Manchester 


Johnson, Charles Alfred 


M.E. 


East Jaffrey 


Jordan, William Dexter 


C.E. 


Colebrook 


Josselyn, Dorothy 


H.E. 


Portsmouth 


Joy, Roland Elmer 


For. 


Manchester 


Joyal, Henry Joseph 


E.E. 


Manchester 


Kearns, Kenneth Edward 


Bus. Fund. 


Wolfeboro 


Kessler, Dorothy Sylvia 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Kilton, Margery Lucille 


A.G. 


West Lebanon 


Kimball, Donald Spurr 


Pre-Law 


Franklin 


Kimball, Jason Tolles 


Bus. Fund. 


Nashua 


King, Florence Lee 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Kirkpatrick, John Gaskill 


M.E. 


Concord 


Kittredge, George Dimmick 


Hart. 


Mont Vernon 


Klein, Norman Wendell 


Bus. Fund. 


Fitchburg, Mass. 


Knox, George Crane 


M.E. 


Concord 


Kramer, Grant 


C.E. 


Ossipee 


Krinsky, Anna 


A.G. 


Somersworth 


Kruger, Herman Adolph 


Bus. Fund. 


Exeter 


Kushious, Samuel Gilbert 


A. G. 


Portsmouth 


Labelle, Henry Antoine 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Lacayo, Julio Cesare 


C.E. 


Leon, Nicaragua 


LaMarche, Richard Alfred 


Bus. Fund. 


Nashua 


Lamberton, Alfred James 


A. G. 


Claremont 


Lanen, Prucia Morrill 


A. G. 


Hampton 


Langlois, Frances Marguerite 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Lapointe, Roland Edward 


Pre- Med. 


Manchester 


Laton, Frances Winifred 


A.G. 


Madbury 


Lavalley, Doris Elizabeth 


A. G. 


Dover 


Lavoie, Alfred Theodore 


E.E. 


Epping 


Leach, Bessie Mae 


A.G. 


Groveton 


Learmonth, Arthur Bignold 


A. G. 


Lawrence, Mass. 


Leclerc, Gregoire Jean 


For. . 


Manchester 


Lee, Russell Henry 


A. G. 


Lexington, Mass. 


LeMay, Gerard Leon 


Bus. Fund. 


Manchester 


Low, Richard Charles 


C.E. 


Derry 


Lundh, Kurt Stone 


For. 


Manchester 


McBride, Headley Addison 


For. 


Wolfeboro 


McCall, David Stuart Russell 


Pre- Med. 
291 


Providence, R. I. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
McCammon, Anne 
McCarthy, Charles Michael 
McCooey, John Edward 
McGowan, Lawrence Raymond 
McGraw, John Reginald 
McKinney, Bartlett 
McLaren, Frederick Robert 
MacLean, Maynard Gilbert 
McLeod, Gordon Donald 
McNamara, Robert William 
MacRury, Elwood Forbes 
McSweeney, Francis Burke 
Macdonald, Raeburn Wallace 
Machon, Herbert William 
Mackey, Elmer Adolphe 
Mahoney, Arthur Joseph 
Main, Robert Winston 
Marshall, Frances Mary 
Marshall, George Helmar Frost 
Marston, Ariel May 
Martin, Ellsworth Paul 
Martin, Marion Marie 
Mason, Frances Olive 
Meader, Elwyn Marshall 
Meader, Leon Burton 
Medzela, John Albert 
Mellett, Dorothy Frances 
Merrill, John Morison 
Milligan, Roy Bayfield 
Milot, Lewis Georges 
Minard, George Oakman 
Moore, Gordon Earle 
Moore, Helen Louise 
Morgan, James Francis 
Morrill, Arthur Leroy 
Mulvanity, Richard Timothy 
Munton, John Peter 
Murray, Kendall Brown 
Mushlin, Harry Ralph 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


Ch.E. 


Peabody, Mass. 


Bus. Fund. 


Dover 


Educ. 


Fairhaven, Mass. 


Bus. Fund. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Berlin 


E.E. 


Manchester 


Bus. Fund. 


Concord 


A. G. 


Concord 


Arch. 


West Lebanon 


A. Ch. 


Manchester 


C.E. 


Concord 


C.E. 


Berlin 


M.E. 


Providence, R. 1. 


Pre-Law 


Fitzwilliam Depot 


Educ. 


Maiden, Mass. 


Agr. Ch. 


Manchester 


A. G. 


Columbia 


Ch.E. 


Lisbon 


Phys. Ed. 


Ashland 


Arch. 


Keene 


A. G. 


Derry 


A. G. 


Winchester 


Hort. 


Rochester 


Agr. 


Rochester 


C.E. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


North Woodstock 


M.E. 


Newfields 


E.E. 


Berlin 


A.G. 


West Roxbury, Mass 


A.G. 


Claremont 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Maiden, Mass. 


Pre- Med. 


Salem 


M.E. 


Salem 


Pre-Law 


Nashua 


C.E. 


Nashua 


Bus. Fund. 


Maiden, Mass. 


A.G. 


Manchester 



292 



Name 
Nash, Anne 

Nichols, Rupert Lorenzo 
Nickerson, Andrew Forrest 
Norton, Charles Edward 
Nowak, Theodore Alexander 
Nutter, Beatrice Mae 
Nutting, Harriet Toye 
Nye, Walter Richard 
O'Kane, Richard Hetherington 
Osgood, Wilfred Beede 
Osgood, William Maurice 
Paine, Philbrook Ten Eyck 
Palmer, Charles Kenneth 
Palmer, Stephen Billings 
Paquin, Laurence Gilbert 
Parke, Richard Ezra 
Parker, John Gilbert 
Parker, Nathaniel Alwais 
Parks, Elizabeth 
Parsons, Marjorie Ada 
Patch, Austin Addams 
Pearson, Rhoda Francena 
Peckham, Warren Francis 
Pendergast, Annetta Doria 
Perfect, Gordon Robert 
Perkins, Lillian Rolance 
Perkins, Walter Maurice 
Phelps, Willard Brooks 
Picard, Leland 
Pickersgill, William Francis 
Pickwick, Mary Alma 
Pike, John Gilbert, Jr. 
Pike, Warren Mahlon 
Pilotte, Russell Arthur 
Pingree, Thomas Shirley 
Piper, Elinor Seeton 
Pitz, Arthur 

Platts, Frances Elizabeth 
Plummer, Ray Andrew 



FRESHMEN 




Course 


P. 0. Address 


A.G. 


Framingham, Mass. 


M.E. 


Sanhornville 


C.E. 


Portsmouth 


E.E. 


RoUinsford 


E.E. 


Exeter 


A.G. 


Rochester 


H.E. 


Francestown 


M.E. 


A tkinson 


on Ch. E. 


Durham 


Ch.E. 


Epping 


Educ. 


Pittsfield 


A.G. 


Durham 


A.G. 


Rochester 


A.G. 


Stoningham, Conn. 


A.G. 


Lebanon 


C.E. 


North Conway 


Pre-Med. 


Guayaquil, Ecuador 


E.E. 


New London 


A.G. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Colehrook 


For. 


Stoneham, Mass. 


H.E. 


Madison 


Ch.E. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Newmarket 


A.G. 


Hampton Falls 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Pre-Law 


Hampton 


A. Ch. 


Nashua 


Bus. Fund. 


Derry 


M.E. 


Newton Center, Mass 


H.E. 


Manchester 


C.E. 


Mill Village 


M.-E. 


Melrose, Mass. 


A. G. 


Whitefield 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Northwood Ridge 


Bus. Fund. 


Durham 


H.E. 


Dover 


Ch. E. 


Berlin 


293 





UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Porter, Howard Home 
Powers, Richard Matthew 
Prendergast, Robert Thorpe 
Prentice, James Mason 
Purington, Carl Hoben 
Quimby, Clyde Warren 
Rahn, Laurette Mary 
Randall, John Leslie, Jr. 
Regan, Barbara Jane 
Richardson, Harold Elmer 
Roberge, Harvey Gerard 
Roberts, Priscilla 
Robinson, Elizabeth Ethel 
Ross, Lorenzo Theodore 
Rowe, Alice Martha 
Rowell, Barbara 
Roy, William Joseph 
Rumazza, Robert Paul 
*Rumery, Ruth Ellen 
Ryder, Miriam Newell 
Sanborn, George Nathaniel 
Savage, John Dana 
Savard, Donald Emile 
Sawtelle, Kenneth White 
Sawyer, Curtis Boyd 
Saylor, Jeannette Elizabeth 
Schnare, Vernon Archibald 
Scripture, Charlotte Rosamond 
Sebra, Zayma Frances 
Seward, Grace Eaton 
Sewell, Chester Balch 
Seymour, Raymond Benedict 
Shackford, Louise Josephine 
Shaver, Jessie Veronica 
Sherman, Herbert Andrew 
Sherman, Luceba Jane 
Shute, Kenneth 
Sichol, Adam Bernard 

* Repeat freshman. 



Course 
Bus. Fund. 
Pre- Med. 
M.E. 
E.E. 
Ch. E. 
E.E. 
A. G. 
A. G. 
H. E. 

Ch. E. 
Educ. 
Bus. Fund. 
A.G. 
Bus. Fund. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 

M.E. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

E.E. 

C.E. 

Bus. Fund 

P.H. 

M.E. 

Educ. 

Bus. Fund 

H. E. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

C.E. 

A. G. 

A. G. 

M.E. 

A.G. 
M. E. 
For. 

294 



P. O. Address 

Wolfehoro 

Manchester 

Claremont 

Holyoke, Mass. 

Concord 

Claremont 

Manchester 

Dover 

Portsmouth 

Gonic 

Berlin 

Marblehead Neck, Mass. 

Antrim 

Somersworth 

Exeter 

Bristol 

Woodsville 

Rochester 

Portland, Maine 

Plaistow 

Concord 

Hampton 
. North Conway 

Go r ham, Maine 

South Danbury 

Dover 
. Berlin 

Surry 

Penacook 

Exeter 

Dover 

Dover 

Hudson 

Schenectady, N. Y. 

Northwood Narrows 

Croydon 

Whitefield 

Newport 





FRESHMEN 




Name 


Course 


P. 0. Address 


Sikoski, Jason Peter 


C.E. 


Hinsdale 


Silverthorne, Myra 


A.G. 


Salem 


Small, Norman Libbey 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Smith, Arthur Parker 


Bus. Fund. 


Peterborough 


Smith, Dorothy Clara 


H.E. 


Lincoln 


Smith, Forrest Asa 


Hort. 


Laconia 


Soule, Dorothy Alberta 


A. Ch. 


Manchester 


Sowerby, John Young 


A.G. 


Dover 


Spalding, Helen Elizabeth 


A.G. 


Plainfield 


Stackpole, Laura 


Bus. Fund. 


Exeter 


Stark, Robert Lawrence 


A.G. 


Goffstown 


Stark, Margaret Mary 


A.G. 


Lawrence, Mass. 


Steele, William Lawrence 


Bus. Fund. 


Gloucester, Mass. 


Stevens, Ralph Ernest 


M.E. 


Manchester 


Stewart, Malcolm Alexander 


Bus. Fund. 


Lakeport 


Stimmell, Lee 


Pre-Law 


Pittsfield 


Stone, John Curtis 


Bus. Fund. 


Hartford, Conn. 


Swail, Clark Ebenezer, Jr. 


Pre- Med. 


Colehrook 


Swain, Pearl Elizabeth 


A.G. 


Hampton Falls 


Szebak, Frank Edward 


M.E. 


Nashua 


Szlosek, Edward Francis 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Tasker, Charles Edwin 


Bus. Fund. 


Dover 


Tatarcuk, Titus Boleslaw 


E.E. 


Nashua 


Teague, Ernestine Louise 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


Tebbetts, Charles LeRoy 


Bus. Fund. 


Nashua 


Thomas, Isabelle Ross 


Phys. Ed. 


Charlestown 


Thomas, Philip Charles 


E.E. 


Claremont 


Thompson, Helen Anna 


A. G. 


Manchester 


Thompson, Tuttle Drake 


M.E. 


East Andover 


Thompson, Virginia 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Thorn, Leif Victor 


E.E. 


Berlin 


Thorp, Frank Dustin 


C.E. 


Manchester 


Tice, Seymour Wilmont 


A.G. 


Go r ham 


Tighe, Robert John 


Pre-Law 


Canaan 


Tile, Victor Sylvester 


A. Cn. 


Groveton 


Tilton, William French, Jr. 


E.E. 


Portsmouth 


Tinker, Gertrude Martha 


A.G. 


Dover 


Titus, Laurence Spear 


For. 


Fair lee, Vt. 


Tobey, Constance 


A.G. 
295 


Hampton 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Tobey, Francelia Marian 
Toolin, Joseph Patrick 
Towle, Alice Stratton 
Trzuskoski, Benjamin Bernard 
Tucker, Ernest Elmer 
Turcott, Dixon Hodgdon 
Twitchell, Keith Irvin 
VanderHoeff, Joseph 
Varjabedian, Robert 
Varney, Kenneth Melville 
Varney, Robert Winfield 
Vaughan, John Robert 
von Fischer-Benzon, Nina Louise 
Wagner, William Isaac 
Wakely, Bertha Shore 
Walker, James Bartlett 
Washburn, John Davies 
Watson, Doris Ethelyn 
Wells, Lloyd Leslie 
Went worth, Lloyd Hall 
Wentzell, Eva Selina 
Werner, Ernest Hugo 

Wheeler, John 

Wheelock, Harold Francis 

Whitcher, John Clinton 

Whipple, Ethel JuHette 

White, Kenneth Ernest 

White, Winslow Moulton 

Whitney, Edward Stanley 

Whitney, Ronald Edward 

Whittemore, Edward Johnson 

Whyte, Edna Ellen 

Wiggin, Ralph Edwin 

Willard, Raymon Charles 

Williams, Dorothy Mae 

Winterton, Ruth Ellen 

Wolf, William 

Woodward, Florence Dewhurst 

Worthen, John Henry 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


North Sutton 


Phys. Ed. 


Exeter 


A. Ch. 


Terryville, Conn. 


M.E. 


Portsmouth 


Pre-Law 


Concord 


C.E. 


Berlin 


M.E. 


Manchester 


C.E. 


Manchester 


Educ. 


Newmarket 


Bus. Fund 


. Dover 


For. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Staten Island, N. Y. 


Bus. Fund 


. Berlin 


H.E. 


Nashua 


M.E. 


Dover 


A.G. 


North Adams, Mass. 


Educ. 


Center Sandwich 


A.G. 


Woodsville 


A.G. 


Salmon Falls 


A.G. 


Worcester, Mass. 


M.E. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Plymouth 


A.G. 


West Swanzey 


M.E. 


Tilton 


H.E. 


Fitzwilliam Depot 


E.E. 


Berlin 


Bus. Fund 


I. Hampton 


P.H. 


Manchester 


C.E. 


Pittsfield 


M.E. 


Plymouth 


A.G. 


Lancaster 


A.G. 


Dover 


Agr. 


Temple 


A.G. 


Dover 


A. G. 


Manchester 


Pre- Med. 


Mil ford 


H.E. 


Berlin 


M.E. 


Plymouth 


296 





TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURAL MEN 



Name 
Yandow, David Arthur 
York, John Weare 
Young, Duanne Eugene 
Young, Hammond Alvah 
Young, Marjorie Bessie 
Young, Rebecca 
Zolkos, Stasia Blanche 
Zotto, Anthony 



Course 
Ch.E. 
Bus. Fund. 
A. G. 
Educ. 
A.G. 

Bus. Fund. 
A.G, 
E.E. 



P. O. Address 

Berlin 

Kensington 

Enfield 

South Acworth 

Rochester 

Exeter 

Pelham 

Claremont 



TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURAL MEN 



First-Year (13) 



Name 
Blood, Edward J. 
Bohanan, Ivan 
Colburn, Robert Tenney 
Fowler, Kenneth Rowe 
Harris, Vernon Stanley 
Hazen, Donald Shattuck 
Jameson, Roland Sanborn 
Pierce, Maurice 
Steele, Moody Gilbert 
Thompson, Eugene Tracy 
Thompson, Herman Ellis, Jr. 
White, Roger Everett 
Wood, D wight Cummings 



P. O, Address 

Hanover 

Contoocook 

Dracut, Mass. 

Henniker 

Peterborough 

Littleton 

Henniker 

Tamworth 

Nashua 

Lowell, Mass. 

Manchester 

Winchester 

Cornish 



Second- Year (9) 



Bradeen, Charles Edwin 
Despres, Wilfred Laurent 
Dining, Carl Moulton 
Hill, Arthur 
Hills, James Herbert 
Nelson, Stanley 
Northrup, Clayton C. 
Simmons, Walter Malcom 
Todd, Laban Paige 



Cornish, Maine 

Marlboro 

Stratham 

Laconia 

Hollis 

Hillsboro 

Milford 

Alstead 

New Boston 



297 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 





Specials (41) 




Name 


Course 


P. O. Address 


Bilodeau, Armand Alfred 


A.G. 


Rochester 


Bingham, Harold Clinton 


A.G. 


Dover 


Burbank, Elliott Winsor 


A. G. 


Alton 


Calnan, Catherine Dorothy 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Carrell, Henry Gustavus 


A.G. 


Exeter 


Cummings, Doris Elizabeth 


Agr. 


Hanover 


Daley, Mary M. 


A.G. 


Dover 


Flanders, Earl S. 


A.G. 


Dover 


Flint, Daniel 


A.G. 


Dover 


Fogg, Hazel Corliss 


A.G. 


Durham 


Fuller, Elsie Kate 


A.G. 


Durham 


Garvin, Clyde 


A.G. 


Dover 


Gerrish, Elsie Augusta 


A.G. 


Meredith 


Girardet, Gustave 


Agr. 


Ashland 


Gouin, Madeline 


A.G. 


Dover 


Hallisey, Dennis Leo 


Pre-Med. 


Nashua 


Higgins, Leroy James 


A.G. 


Littleton 


Kalijarvi, Dorothy 


A.G. 


Durham 


Kirk, Bertha 


A.G. 


Dover 


Langley, Marion Helen 


A.G. 


Exeter 


Lizio, Ralph Americo 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


Lougee, Robert William 


Agr. 


Milton 


Minichiello, Lewis Allan 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


Mitchell, Angle 


H.E. 


Durham 


Muchmore, Effie Louise 


H.E. 


North Woodstock 


Muzzy, Nellie L. 


A.G. 


Jefferson 


Nulsen, Dorothy 


A.G. 


Durham 


Putnam, Howard Streeter 


Agr. 


Claremont 


Redden, Catherine R. 


A.G. 


Dover 


Redden, Eleanor M. 


A.G. 


Dover 


Royce, Frances Mary 


A.G. 


Somersworth 


Sink, Heber B. 


A.G. 


Exeter 


Sayer, James Albert, Jr. 


Ch.E. 


Salem Depot 


Seavey, Marion Katherine 


A.G. 


Suncook 


Sluzewski, Andrzy 


Agr. 


South Hampton 


Stevenson, Douglas McLeod 


A.G. 


Rochester 


Stolworthy, Marion J. 


H.E. 


Durham 


Whiting, William Porritt 


Agr. 
298 


Wilton 



SUMMER SESSION, 1929 



Name 


Course 


P. 0. Address 


Williams, Norman Hall 


A.G. 


Durham 


Winslow, Everett May 


A. G. 


Dover 


Woznicki, Mathios 


Agr. 


South Hampton 


SUMMER 


SESSION, 1929 


Name 


Graduate 


P. 0. Address 


Adams, Dorothy Quincy 


Holyoke '24 


Roslindale, Mass. 


Adams, Robert Wallace 




Pittsfield 


Agrafiotis, Chris John 


N. H. '28 


Manchester 


Agranovitch, Edward Irving 




Colchester, Conn. 


Allan, Philip Farley 




West Lebanon 


Anderson, Hulda Josephine 




Manchester 


Annett, Dorothy Adaline 




Rollinsford 


Atherton, Harlan Ernest 


Yale '25 


Charlestown 


Averka, Charles Peter 




Lawrence, Mass. 


Ayer, Theodore Henry 




Milton Mills 


Bailey, Thomas Craig 


N. H. '12 


Hartford, Conn. 


Baker, Catherine Mabel 




Meriden 


Baker, Rachel Felch 


B. U. '13 


Newmarket 


Bartlett, Benjamin Thomas 




Derry Village 


Bartlett, Fremont Dayton 




Berlin 


Beals, Robert Vernon 


Harvard '27 


Concord 


Bean, Catherine Frances 




Concord 


Bell, Woodbury Dow- 




■Hollis 


Bertram, Wallace 




Hanover 


Betz, Edwin 




Whitefield 


Bishop, John Lloyd 




Nashua 


Blaisdell, Daniel Crysler 




Plymouth 


Blanchard, George Walton 




Portland, Maine 


Bolger, Elsie Marie 




Philadelphia, Pa. 


Boothby, Bradford Saunders 




Wakefield, Mass. 


Bottum, Alfred L. 




Bennington, Vt. 


Branon, Anne M. 




Concord 


Brierley, Jean 


" 


Lawrence, Mass. 


Briggs, Mary Lilla 




Auburn, Maine 


Bryant, Floyd G. 




Tilton 


Buffum, Edward Henry 




Manchester 


Burgess, Josph Reed 




Nantucket, Mass. 


Burleigh, Ivy May 




Laconia 



299 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Burlingame, Philip Russell 
Burnham, Gertrude 
Burrill, Guy Francis 
Burroughs, Arthur Travers 
Camps, Lucille C. 
Camps, Vivienne Mercedes 
Carpenter, Edna Charlotte 
Cass, Gertrude Genevieve 
Chandler, Roland Francis 
Charland, Norman C. 
Clapp, Richard Caswell 
Clark, Gertrude Imogene 
Clarke, Ida Amelia 
Clarner, Louis George Karl 
Cleveland, Harlan Samuel 
Clifford, Doris Hilda 
Cohen, Bessie 
Colbert, William Joseph 
Colby, Arvilla Nesmith 
Colby, Faoline Hope 
Coleman, Mabelle Clow 
Comire, Irene A. 
Connell, John David 
Connor, Regina 
Cooper, Paul Herman 
Corey, Mildred 
Corson, Hazel 
Corson, Hilda 
Couser, William Griffith 
Crane, Isabella Cameron 
Crosby, John Franklin 
Cummings, Leslie Samuel 
Currie, Alexander Blanchard 
Currie, Wilsie Austin 
Curtis, Lois H. 
Daggett, Albert F. 
Dalton, Helen Elizabeth 
D'Arcy, George Baker 
Davis, Alice Lillian 



Graduate 



Wellesley '29 



N. H. '28 



N. H. '29 
Dartmouth '00 

Emerson '18 

N. H. '13 
N. H. '29 



Wesleyan '27 
Wellesley '27 

N. H. '26 
N. H. '29 

Holyoke, '24 
N. H. '28 
Trinity '23 



300 



P. O. Address 

Berlin 

Grafton 

Claremont 

Hudson 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Willimantic, Conn 

Topsfield, Mass. 

Wolfeboro 

Lyndonville, Vt. 

Concord 

Boston, Mass. 

Farmington 

Concord 

North Stratford 

Conway 

Portsmouth 

Durham 

Newmarket 

Danville 

Rochester 

Franklin 

Fall River, Mass. 

Newmarket 

Lincoln 

Manchester 

Rochester 

Rochester 

Dover 

Keene 

Danielson, Conn. 

Bethlehem 

Manchester 

Providence, R. I. 

West Roxbury, Mass. 

Concord 

Warren, Mass. 

Dover 

Fremont 



SUMMER SESSION, 1929 



Name 
Davis, Delia Rhoda 
Degnan, Julia M, 
Dickey, Frank W, 
Dismukes, Judith Lee 
Dodge, Charles Eben 
Dodge, Charles Frank 
Doe, Harvey Franklin 
Doe, Richard Thompson 
Dolan, Loretta Genevieve 
Dolan, Mary 
Donnelly, John Joseph 
Donnelly, Mary 
Donovan, Elizabeth Nichols 
Downing, Cecilia Eleanor 
Duggan, Marian Elizabeth 
Dunlap, Lloyd Walter 
Durgin, Roslyn Caver ly 
Dyer, Alice Louise 
Eastham, Alice Scott 
Ekdahl, Hulda Elisabeth 
Emerson, Esther 
Ewing, Lyle Wilson 
Exerjian, Arax 
Farrand, Katherine . 
Farrington, Ervin S. 

Fernald, Josephine 
Fernald, Mary Louise 
Fish, Joseph Theodore 
Flynn, Philip John 
Flynn, Richard Joseph 
Fogg, Hazel Corliss 
Folsom, Jessie Newcomb 
Forbes, Ernest Fred 
Foss, Helen Elizabeth 
Foster, Martha Harriett 
Fountain, Alice Mary 
Francis, Horace Brown 
French, Anne May 



Graduate 



N. H. '26 
N. H. '28 
N. H. '22 
Bowdoin '21 
Dartmouth '29 

N. H. '27 



Wellesley '26 



Colby '21 

Syracuse '23 
Holyoke '20 
McCormick '06 



Tufts '29 



N. H. '23 
Bates '27 



P. O. Address 

Keene 

Manchester 

Manchester 

Portsmouth 

Pittsfield 

Concord 

Verona, N. J. 

Dover 

Nashua 

Nashua 

Dover 

Manchester 

Newton Centre, Mass, 

Nashua 

Berlin 

Laconia 

Newmarket 

Charleston, Maine 

Portsmouth 

Nashua 

Haverhill, Mass. 

Claremont 

New York City 

Berlin 

Bucksport Centre^ 

Maine 
Nottingham 
Nottingham 
East Kingston 
Fitchburg, Mass. 
Dover 
Durham 

Sweet Briar, Va. 
Enfield 
Rochester 
Taunton, Mass. 
West Thornton 
Manchester 
Exeter 



301 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
French, Chauncey Wentworth 
Fuller, John M. 
Fussell, Clyde Greenleaf 
Gale, Marjorie Harriet 
Gallagher, Mary Veronica 
Gardner, Frederick deWitt 
Garvin, Carl Hanson 
Garvin, Mary 
Gillette, Charles Welcome 
Gilman, Sheldon Miller 
Gleason, Eleanor 
Goodwin, Crystal Evelyn 
Gordon, Dorothy May 
Gorman, Genevieve 
Grant, Francis V. 
Gray, Gertrude 
Gustafson, Walter Ludwig 
Guy, John 

Hamilton, Richard Andrews 
Harmon, Carlyle Henry 
Harriman, Carl E. 
Harriman, Dorothy Story 
Harris, Eleanor Woodward 
Hart, Ellen Louise 
Hartwell, Lillian Eleanor 
Healy, Arthur Joseph 
Hennessy, Thomas Edward 
Herring, Cora Allen 
Herzig, Fred John 
Hikel, Nolan George 
Hills, Clarissa 
Hirsch, Marguerite Helen 
Hobbs, Ethel Mae 
Hoitt, Mary Georgene 
Holden, Lewis Edward 
Holmes, Margaret Catherine 
Home, Ruth Frances 
Hounsell, Elizabeth Jane 
Hounsell, William Booth 



Graduate 

Iowa '11 
Middlebury '25 
N. H. '27 



N. H. '26 



Colgate '21 



N. H. '28 
N. H. '29 



Middlebury '25 



Wellesley '23 

N. H. '25 
Wesley an '16 



P. O. Address 

Deerfield 

Durham 

Whitefield 

Dover 

Nashua 

Portsmouth 

Kingston 

Sanhornville 

Nashua 

Pittsfield 

Dublin 

Dover 

Woodfords, Maine 

Thompsonville, Conn. 

Williamstown, Mass. 

Whitefield 

Portsmouth 

Somersworth 

Greenfisld, Mass. 

Biddeford, Maine 

Woodsville 

Hopkinton 

Keene 

Go7iic 

Nashua 

Manchester 

Somersworth 

North Attleboro, Mass. 

Simsbury, Conn. 

Plymouth 

Pelham 

Milton, Mass. 

Somersworth 

Durham 

Rochester 

East Providence, R. /. 

Rochester 

Conway 

Durham 



302 



SUMMER SESSION, 1929 



Name 
Howe, Martha Whittieer 
Howell, Cecil Vernon 
Hutchins, Samuel 
Hutton, Eben B. 
Jackson, Herbert William 
Jenkins, Ruth Ellen 
Jenkins, Walter Scott 
Jenness, Margaret 
Jennison, David Blanchard 
Johnson, Dorothy Lura 
Johnson, Frances Ann 
Johnson, Ralph Roscoe 
Johnson, Sylvia Nathalie 
Jones, Evelyn Margaret 
Kay, Mildred Kathryn 
Kelley, Ethel Etta 
Kendall, Elizabeth Parker 
Kendall, Raymond Osgood 
Keough, George Harland 
Kimball, Merle Donald 
King, Elizabeth Rose 
Kingsley, Mary Barry 
Knight, William Henry 
Knowles, Mildred Blanche 

Langlois, Fred Clayton 
Lavallee, Hubert Arsene 
Leahy, Elinor Frances 
LeClaire, Pauline 
Leighton, Charlotte Mary 
Levesque, Adrian Joseph 
Lewis, Allen Ingalls 
Lewis, Delia Ingalls 
Lewis, Frank Herbert 
Little, Marion Goodwin 
Lord, Esther Belinda 
Lorden, Earl Eastman 
Lundstrom, Edith O. 
Lynch, George William 



Graduate 
N. H. '29 



N. H. '26 



N. H. '27 

Clark '20 
N. H. '27 



New Rochelle *27 



N. H. '21 



N. H. '22 



N. H. '21 



303 



P. O. Address 

Portland, Maine 

Dover 

Wells River, Vt. 

Concord 

Durham 

Durham 

Goffstown 

Wolfeboro 

Milford 

Northwood 

Littleton 

Hampton 

Bridgewater, Conn. 

Farmington 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Manchester 

Manchester 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

Gorham 

South Danville 

Manchester 

Yonkers, N. Y. 

New London 

South Berwick, 

Maine 
Lebanon 
Berlin 
Somersworth 
Nashua 
Rochester 
Nashua 
Concord 
Concord 

Terryville, Conn, 
Manchester 
Melvin Village 
Gerrish 

Worcester, Mass, 
Nashua 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Lynch, Mary Elizabeth 
McCooey, Daniel Farley 
MacDonald, Mary Elizabeth 
MacDonald, Raymond Francis 
McGrail, Marie Jeannette 
Mcintosh, David Chalmers, Jr. 
Mcintosh, Sheldon Weeks 
McLeod, John Kenneth 
McWeeney, Alice Frances 
Mahar, John Edward 
Mahoney, Dorothy Regina 
Mann, Frederic White 
Manning, John N. 
Martin, Frank Sawyer 
Martoski, Stanley John 
Marvin, Edward S. 
Mattoon, Gertrude Beckler 
Maynard, Eleanor 
Maxam, Eugene C. 
Meader, Annie Vickery 
Meader, Faith 
Meader, Grace McDuffee 
Melendy, E. Alice 
Meloon, Charles Leighton 
Melville, Eva Hester 
Melville, George Donald 
Mitchel, Edith Foss 
Monahan, Mary Sanborn 
Moody, Myrtle Helen 
Morrison, Leonard Samuel 
Muchmore, Effie Louise 
Muzzey, George Aldrich 
Myllykangas, Lauri Edward 
Nagle, William Stephen 
Nealley, Miriam Andrews 

Nelson, John Francis 
Nodes, Norbert Coyne 
Nyland, Ithamar 



Graduate 
B. U. '25 

Smith '09 



Dartmouth '29 



N. H. '25 



N. H. '26 



N. H. '28 
N. H. '20 
N. H. '20 



N. H. '10 



U. of Maine '25 



Dartmouth '16 



N. H. '28 
304 



P. O. Address 

Boston, Mass. 

Dover 

Hartford, Conn. 

Peterborough 

Dover 

Dover 

Durham 

Concord 

Nashua 

Norwood, Mass. 

Westboro, Mass. 

East Concord 

Rochester 

Newport 

Durham 

Portsmouth 

Colebrook 

Pawtucket, R. I. 

Concord 

Dover 

Conic 

Conic 

Manchester 

Portsmouth 

Newmarket 

Newmarket 

Conic 

East Kingston 

Concord 

Whitefleld 

North Woodstock 

Sangerville, Maine 

Fitchburg, Mass. 

Milton Mills 

South Berwick, 

Maine 
Cloucester, Mass. 
Bergenfield, N. J. 
West Hartford, Conn. 



SUMMER SESSION, 1929 



Name 


Graduate 


P. 0. Address 


O'Connor, Edwin James 




Hanover 


Olsen, Eleanor C. 




New Bedford, Mass. 


O'Neil, Beatrice Alma 




Kew Gardens, N. Y. 


Orr, May Chapel 


Gordon '26 


Suffield, Conn. 


Paine, Philbrook Ten Eyck 




Durham 


Paine, Florence Alice 


N. H. '25 


Wolfeboro 


Palmer, Beatrice Marie 




Medford, Mass. 


Papp, Alpha James 




Manchester 


Parkinson, Everton Harry 


Wesleyan '26 


Salem Depot 


Parks, Philip Edward 




Waterville, Maine 


Parshley, Sylvester Mansfield 




Wolfeboro 


Patenaude, Merle R. 




Henniker 


Patterson, Anna Alice 




Claremont 


Peabody, Ethel Capitolia 




Peterborough 


Peakes, Dorothy 




South Lincoln, Mass. 


Pearson, Dorothy 




Stratham 


Peaslee, Charlotte Lucy 


N. H. '29 


Reed's Ferry 


Pelkey, Mildred Cecelia 




Peterborough 


Pellerin, Jesse L. 


N. H. '27 


West Canaan 


Perkins, Anne 


Middlehury '14 


Durham 


Perkins, Ernest Marshall 




East Kingston 


Perry, Robert Folsom 


U. S. N. A. '19 


Nashua 


Peters, Mildred Brice 




Wilton 


Peterson, Stanley Samuel 




Manchester 


Phelps, Marion Batchellor 




Nashua 


Pierce, Norman James 




Wakefield, Mass. 


Pinkham, Marcia Winter 




Portland, Maine 


Pollard, Annie Archer 




Grand Rapids, Mich. 


Powell, Henry Spencer 




Washington, D. C. 


Prescott, Dorothy Nutting 


Portia Law '26 


Plaistow 


Pride, Eva 


U. of Maine 


Portland, Maine 


Putnam, Lawrence Sargent 




South Lyndeboro 


Record, Lewis Stillman 


BrowTK '02 


East Jaffrey 


Reed, Paul J. 




Manchester 


Richards, Robert Ladd 




Durham 


Richardson, John Russell 




Waterville, Maine 


Ricker, Carolyn H. 






Robbins, Grover Cleveland 


Carnegie '16 


Derry 


Robinson, Arthur Parks 


305 


North Attleboro, Mass. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Robinson, Ellis Jaquith 
Robinson, Kenneth Heaton 
Rollins, Ruth Sanders 
Rollins, VVillard Dow 
Romano, Filomena 
Ross, Lawrence Waldo 
Rowden, Margaret Hall 
Rowell, Leonard Dexter 
Roy, Oscar Joseph 
Ryan, Anna May 
Sanborn, Miriam Louise 
Sanders, Richard Boynton 
Savory, Emily E. 
Sawin, Edward Parker 
Scott, Ruth Beatrice 
Seavey, Marion Katherine 
Sevigny, Dorothy I. 
Shattuck, Granville 
Sheehan, Eleanor Lucey 
Sheehan, John Francis 
Shepard, Harriet E. 
Siiro, Martha Joan 
Sisk, James Burton, Jr. 
Small, John A. 
Smith, Charlotte Marie 
Smith, Evelyn Hope 
Smith, Henry M. 
Smith, Lydia Rebecca 
Smith, Marion Edith 
Smith, Otis Sanborn 
Smith, S. Marion 
Snyder, Katherine Stuart 
Soule, Leon L. 
Spalding, Willard Benjamin 
Stearns, William M. 
Steeves, Muriel Frances 
Steeves, Reginald V. T. 
Stoddard, Henry Dikeman 
Stokes, Edward Parker 



Graduate 
Muhlenberg '26 



N. H. '25 



Conn. Agric. '21 
Wellesley '13 



N. H. '28 



Worcester Nor. '25 



N. H. '27 
N. H. '27 

Maine Wesleyan ' 
M. I. T. '10 



B. U. '26 

N. H. '28 
N. H. '24 



306 



P. O. Address 

Woodbridge, iV. /. 
Keene 
West Alton 
West Alton 
West Lebanon 
Gorham 
Tilton 
Manchester 
Newmarket 
Rochester 
Tilton 

St. Paul, Minn. 
Warner 

Northwood Centre 
Wolfeboro 
Suncook 
Hartford, Conn. 
Granby, Conn. 
Portsmouth 
Portsmouth 
Bedford 

Worcester, Mass, 
Providence, R. I. 
Nashua 
Dover 

Providence, R. I, 
Dover 

92 Dudley, Mass. 
Lakeport 
Laconia 
Proctor, Vt. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brunswick, Maine 
Charlton, Mass. 
Dover 
Dover 

Centre Strafford 
Providence, R. I. 
Beverly, Mass. 



SUMMER SESSION, 1929 



Name 


Graduate 


P. 0. Address 


Stolworthy, Marion J. 




Durham 


Stoughton, Carroll 




Lancaster 


Stratton, Mildred Gladys 




Nashua 


Suitor, Dorothy Emma 




Whitefield 


Sullivan, M. Clare 




Ware, Mass. 


Sylvestre, Naomi Rosana 




Littleton 


Tahaney, John Wilbur 




Beverly, Mass. 


Tallman, Earl Armstrong 




Manchester 


Tarr, Forace Austin 




North Hampton 


Taylor, John Leonard 




Salem Depot 


Terrill, Roy Leslie 




Lakeport 


Theali, John William 




Manchester 


Thompson, Isabelle Beatrice 


Leland Poivers 


'28 Hampton 


Thompson, Ruth E. 


N. H. '29 


Hudson 


Tobey, Ardra 




Wolfeboro 


Tobe}^, Lester B. 




Hampton 


Tolman, Rodger Milton 




Rochester 


Towle, Elizabeth Lamprey 


Smith '28 


Dover 


Twomey, Dorothy Winifred 




Concord 


Varney, Elizabeth Adams 




Somersworth 


Vatcher, George Irving 




Hancock 


von Fischer-Benzon, Nina Louise 


Stapleton,S.L, N. Y. 


Wales, Gardner H. 




Durham 


Walker, Susan 


N. H. '25 


Durham 


Warfield, Vera Willis 


Lasell '16 


Gorham 


Weast, Florence lola 




Contoocook 


Weber, Elizabeth Anne 


U. of Chicago 


'27 New York City 


Wentworth Aurelia Edna 


Bates '26 


Scarboro, Maine 


Wentworth, Lloyd Hall 




Salmon Falls 


West, Marjorie M. 


N. H. '29 


Worcester, Mass. 


Weston, Helen Brown 


N. H. '17 


Whitefield 


Weston, Ralph Frank 


N. H. '25 


Fitchburg, Mass. 


Wheeler, Milton George 




Lewiston, Maine 


Whitney, Bessie Pauline 




A ntrim 


Whittemore, Arthur 


N. H. '17 


Londonderry 


Wilbur, Gladys Elizabeth 


Brown '15 


Middletown, Conn. 


Willey, Floyd L. 




Manchester 


Willey, Henry Ambrose 




Durham 


Williams, Lillian Annie 




Ridgefield, Conn. 



307 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Woods, Wadleigh Winston 
Wright, Murray J. 



Graduate 
Dartmouth *27 
Dartmouth ^26 



P. O. Address 

Portsmouth 
Alton 



EXTENSION SHORT COURSES (12) 



Name 
Boucher, Irene Elizabeth 
Burleigh, Ivy May 
Edmond, Margaret 
Fassett, Florence Alice 
Hickey, Julia Redempta 
Ingerson, Rosamond E. 
McGoff, Gertrude R. 
Parkinson, Mary Louise 
Schurman, Dorothy Gardner 
Smith, Marguerite Jeanette 
Stoughton, Carroll 
Suitor, Dorothy Emma 



P. O. Address 

Whitefield 

Whitefield 

Whitefield 

Lancaster 

Whitefield 

Lancaster 

Lancaster 

Whitefield 

Lancaster 

Whitefield 

Lancaster 

Whitefield 



308 



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UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

COMPARATIVE REGISTRATION 

(At Durham) 





Regular 
Courses 


Summer 

School 

and Short 

Courses * 


Men 


Women 


Total 


1893-94 


64 

93 

83 

88 

82 

82 

86 

93 

102 

103 

110 

123 

154 

172 

183 

198 

193 

207 

231 

259 

300 

387 

461 

574 

530 

593 

774 

845 

907 

1,036 

1,154 

1,202 

1,347 

1,467 

1,658 

1,553 


is 

29 

17 

50 

10 

33 

32 

29 

18 

24 

36 

41 

38 

20 

33 

55 

73 

84 

95 

103 

131 

192 

92 

32 

14 

44 

46 

66 

161 

175 

229 

267 

317 

306 

365 


54 

78 

80 

79 

90 

79 

103 

115 

125 

117 

126 

151 

183 

196 

188 

218 

312 

249 

285 

306 

322 

405 

505 

514 

399 

439 

631 

682 

759 

922 

993 

1,029 

1,143 

1,217 

1,277 

1,294 


10 

30 

32 

26 

42 

13 

16 

10 

6 

4 

8 

8 

12 

14 

15 

13 

16 

17 

22 

30 

63 

87 

113 

152 

163 

168 

187 

209 

214 

275 

336 

402 

471 

567 

626 

624 


64 


1894-95 

1895-96 


108 
112 


1896-97 


105 


1897-98 


132 


1898-99 


92 


1899-1900 


119 


1900-01 


125 


1901-02 


131 


1902-03 


121 


1903-04 


134 


1904-05 


159 


1905-06 


195 


1906-07 


210 


1907-08 


203 


1908-09 


231 


1909-10 

1910-11 

1911-12 

1912-13 

1913-14 

1914-15 

1915-16 


248 
280 
315 
354 
403 
518 
653 


1916-17 

1917-18 

1918-19t 


666 
562 
607 


1919-20 


818 


1920-21 

1921-22 


891 
973 


1922-23 

1923-24 

1924-25 

1925-26 

1926-27 

1927-28 


1,197 
1,329 
1,431 
1,614 
1,784 
1,903 


1928-29 


1,918 







♦Includes Summer School, Two- Year Agriculture, Poultry Extension and Dairy 
Short Courses. 

t During 1918-19 there were 1,467 additional men registered for special military 
work under the S. A. T. C. organization, 

310 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE ALUMNI 

ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association expects all two- and four-year graduates to 
become active members, and all former students to become associate 
members of the Alumni Association. The dues, together with subscrip- 
tion to THE NEW HAMPSHIRE ALUMNUS, are $2.00 per year, 
payable in advance. 

The fiscal year of the Association commences on the first day of July. 

OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1929-1930 

President A. S. Baker, '21, 34 Auburn 

St., Concord, N. H. 
1st Vice-President M. C. Huse, '08, 1000 Chestnut 

St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
2nd Vice-President Miss Sara E. Greenfield, '19, 

32 Portland St., Rochester, 

N. H. 
Secretary-Treasurer C. W. Pattee, '26, Durham, 

N. H. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

A. S. Baker, '21 G. A. Perley, '08 

M. C. Huse, '08 H. A. Rollins, '23 

C. H. Hood, '80 F. W. Randall, '07 

W. P. Davis, 2 yr., '12 Sara E. Greenfield, '19 

E. S. Whittemore, '97 

BRANCH ASSOCIATIONS 

Boston Branch. Formed Nov. 15, 1919. 
President Chris J. O'Leary, '20, Box 126, Newfields, N. H. 
Vice-Pres. Lawrence S. Holland, '25, Riverway Manor, 210 River- 
way, Boston, Mass. 
Secretary Mrs. Frances Fairchild Taylor, '27, 2 Crawford St., 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Treasurer Samuel Patrick, '23 

New York City Branch. Formed Oct. 21, 1919. 

President Carl D. Kennedy, '09, 111 Garrison Ave., Jersey City, 
N.J. 

311 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Vice-Pres. Walter S. Meader, Jr., '22, 72 S. Portland Ave., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Sec.-Treas. Paul A. Morse, '25, 473 Franklin Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Connecticut Branch. Formed Nov. 12, 1920. 

President Thomas C. Bailey, '12, 57 Oakland Terrace, Hartford, 

Conn. 
Vice-Pres. Mrs. Irene Mayo Nichols, '22, 8 Williams St., Ansonia, 

Conn. 
Sec.-Treas. J. A. Manter, '12, Conn. Agri. College, Storrs, Conn. 

Eastern New York Branch. Organized April 16, 1921. 

President Otis W. Pike, '20, 1130 Palmer Ave., Schenectady, N. Y. 
Vice-Pres. Albert H. French, '24, 28 Mynderse St., Schenectady, 

N. Y. 
Sec-Treas. J. Harry Priest, '08, 2401 Albany St., Schenectady, 

N. Y. 
Publicity Gerald N. Perkins, '14, 1080 Keyes Ave., Schenectady, 

N. Y. 

Connecticut Valley Branch. Organized Jan. 21, 1921. 

President Curtis P. Donnell, '24, 9 Temple St., Springfield, Mass. 
Vice-Pres. Elwin H. Forristall, '06, 124 Firglade Ave., Springfield, 

Mass. 
Sec.-Treas. John E. Miltimore, '18, 398 Elm St., West Springfield, 

Mass. 

Concord Branch. Organized 1921. 
President Henry P. Callahan, '23, 73 Rumford St., Concord, N. H. 
Vice-Pres. Perley F. Ayer, '22, 11 Queen St., Penacook, N. H. 
Secretary Mrs. Mary B. Dye, ex-'21, 104 Rumford St., Concord, 
N. H. 

North Vermont at Barre, Vt. Organized May 27, 1923. 

President Henry B. Caswell, '19, 15 University Terrace, Burlington, 

Vt. 
Sec.-Treas. Mrs. Helen M. Graham, '20, Northfield, Vt. 

Cheshire County Branch at Keene. Organized June 13, 1923. 
President Robert Watkins, '22, 52 Wilder St., Keene, N. H. 
Sec.-Treas. Ralph W. Newell, '23, 83 Spring St., Keene, N. H. 

312 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Laconia Branch. Organized Sept. 17, 1923. 

President Charles E. Lord, '23, 11 Kentfield Court, Laconia, N. H. 
Vice-Pres. Walter Huse, '21, 31 Edwards St., Laconia, N. H. 
Sec.-Treas. Joseph Horn, '25, R. F. D. No. 2, Laconia, N. H. 

Durham Branch. Organized Nov. 6, 1923. 
President Carl Lundholm, '21 
Vice-Pres. Mrs. Edythe T. Richardson, '22 
Sec.-Treas. Leon C. Glover, '23 

Manchester, N. H., Branch. Organized Dec. 12, 1923. 

President Mildred Bangs, '23, 251 Concord St., Manchester, N. H. 
Vice-Pres. Ernest L. Bell, '20, 114 Webster St., Manchester, N. H. 
Sec.-Treas. Louise Burpee, '17, Goffstown, N. H. 

Providence Branch. Organized Dec. 9, 1924. 

President Frank H. Bills, '10, R. I. State College, Box 183, King- 
ston, R. I. 

Vice-Pres. Henry B. Applin, '26, 22 Jillson St., Providence, R. I. 

Sec.-Treas. Leonard P. Philbrick, '17, 145 Babcock St., Providence, 
R. I. 

Corre. Dr. Cecil C. Dustin, '19, 199 Thayer St., Providence, 

R. I. 

Philadelphia Branch. Organized Dec. 1, 1924. 
President Merritt C. Huse, '08, 1000 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Vice-Pres. Miss Goldie Basch, '17, 1711 FitzwiUiam St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 
Secretary Lewis H. Kenney, '99, Bldg. No. 7, Navy Yard, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 
Treas. Max McConachie, '20, 1321 Walnut St., Philadelphia, 

Pa. 

Worcester Branch. Organized May 4, 1925. 

President Alfred N. Graham, ex-'18, 21 Pomona Road, Worcester, 

Mass. 
Vice-Pres. Mrs. Marion L. Healy, '19, 15 Oberlin St., Worcester, 

Mass. 
Secretary Paul C. Farrar, '26, 19 Maywood St., Worcester, Mass. 
Treasurer Mrs. Marjorie M. Woodward, ex-'25, 4 Avalon Place, 

Worcester, Mass. 

Southern Vermont Branch. 
President James Griswold, '20, Box 494, Springfield, Vt. 

313 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Nashua Branch. Reorganized Jan. 16, 1927. 

President Harold G. French, '21, Hudson, N. H. 
Vice-Pres. Herbert C. Leach, ex-' 13, Litchfield, N. H. 
Sec.-Treas. Donald C. Calderwood, '27, 9 Manchester St., Nashua, 

N. H. 

Portland Branch. 

President Everett S. Whittemore, '97, 28 Read St., Portland, 

Maine. 
Vice-Pres. Miss D. Frances Langley, *21, 59 State St., Apt. 36, 

Portland, Maine. 
Sec.-Treas. D. Kilton Andrew, '23, 16 Fairmount St., Portland, 

Maine. 

Ohio Branch. 

President Lawrence M. True, '23, 7808 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 
Secretary Willard E. Nudd, '19, 14616 Elm Ave., East Cleveland, 

Ohio. 

White Mountain Club. 

President Leonard S. Morrison, '10, Whitefield, N. H. 
Vice-Pres. Harold Lane, 2 yr., '14, Lancaster, N. H. 
Sec.-Treas. Donald Mattoon, '22, Colebrook, N. H. 

Southern California Club. 

President Carleton B. Tibbetts, '17, 1812 West Drive, San Marino, 
Calif. 

Vice-Pres. Lester L. Sawyer, '22, 6147 Piedmont Ave., Los An- 
geles, Calif. 

SergH-at-Arms Eldred L. Sanborn, '16, 1418 N. Normandie Ave., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Secretary Roger E. Sprague, ex-'25, 1133 E. Lexington Ave., 
Glendale, Calif. 

New Hampshire Agricultural Alumni Association. 
President Alfred L. French, '23, Contoocook, N. H. 
Secretary Howard A. Rollins, '23, Durham, N. H. 



314 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Accounting 127 

Admission, Requirements for 

College, four-year courses 45 

Special courses 52 

Two-year course 230 

From other Colleges 52 

Advanced Standing 52 

Agricultural Chemistry 97 

Agricultural College 63 

Agriculture 

Description of subjects 63 

Four-year courses 62 

Two-year course 233 

Agronomy 101 

Alumni Associations 311 

Animal Husbandry 103 

Architecture 106 

Art 109 

Astronomy 180 

Board 32 

Books 32 

Botany 110 

Buildings 22 

Calendar 7 

Chemistry 112 

Civil Engineering 116 

Coast Artillery 195 

Colleges of 

Agriculture 63 

Liberal Arts 75 

Technology ^. 86 

Courses 

Four-year 61 

Two-year 61 

Dairy Husbandry 121 

Degrees 

Advanced 54 

315 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

PAGE 

Conferred in 1929 242 

Requirements for 56 

Undergraduate 56 

Professional 55 

Dormitories 23 

Drawing 

Free-hand 109 

Mechanical 181 

Durham 22 

Economics 123 

Education 129 

Electrical Engineering 138 

English 143 

Enrollment 255 

Entomology 149 

Equipment 23 

Expenses 31 

Experiment Station 240 

Extension Service 241 

Facilities for Instruction 22 

Faculty 

Agricultural Experiment Station 16 

Extension Service 18 

University 10 

Fine Arts 109 

Forestry 151 

Forge Shop; see Shops 

French 172 

Geology 154 

German 1 74 

Graduate School 53 

Graduating Class, 1929 244 

Greek 175 

Health Service 33 

Historical Sketch 20 

History 157 

Home Economics 161 

Horticulture 167 

Infirmary 33 

316 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Languages; see specific languages, as French 

Latin 175 

Library Science 178 

Loan Fund 36 

Location 22 

Machine Shop; see Shops 

Mathematics 178 

Mechanical Engineering 181 

Meteorology 1 89 

Military Science 190 

Music 197 

Organizations, Student 42 

Philosophy 204 

Physical Education 

Men 207 

Women 209 

Physics 212 

Political Science 215 

Poultry Husbandry 218 

Prizes 37 

Awarded 1929 253 

Psychology 205 

R. O. T. C 190 

Residential Halls 23 

Rooms 32 

Room Rents 32 

Scholarships 33 

Self-support 33 

Shops 

Building 22 

Subjects 182 

Smith-Hughes Work 129 

Social Science 221 

Sociology 221 

Spanish 177 

Special Students 52 

Statistics, Department of 225 

Statistics, Registration 309 

317 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

PAGE 

Students 

List of 255 

Organizations 42 

Special 52 

Subjects, Description of 97 

Summer Session 96 

Teacher Training; see Education 

Theses 54,56 

Trustees 9 

Tuition ^1 

Typewriting 128 

University Aids ■^^ 

Wood Shop; see Shops 

Zoology 226 



318 



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